oilless compressor leaking oil


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Old 08-10-03, 08:45 PM
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oilless compressor leaking oil

I just purchased a Porter Cable CF2600 compressor/nailer combo. After running the compressor for the first time for 15 minutes with the drain valve open, there was oil leaking from the engine down the side of the pancake tank. This is supposed to be an oil-less unit. Is this normal for the first use? Is this normal at all?

Thanks.
 
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Old 08-10-03, 09:09 PM
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flpicshooter:

Here is a qoute from their web site on this unit: "Oil-free design -- no oil spillage or work spotting"
It could be from the electric motor bearings but I would have it checked under warranty.
Do the instructions tell you what the duty cycle is?

http://www.portercablepowertools.com...ors/CF2600.htm
 
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Old 08-10-03, 09:39 PM
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Thanks for the Porter-Cable link.

In the manual, it says:

The Porter-Cable air compressors should be operated on not more than a 50% duty cycle. Maximum compressor pumping time per hour is 30 minutes.
 
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Old 08-14-03, 04:03 AM
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Yea, some of those oil less ones are the rock bottom pits .

I have a 919-164180 4 hp/18 gallon Craftsman (made by DeVilbiss) that will leak out of the tank in a few days left unattended. I've changed the pet****, regulator and such, but it still persists.

I've also noticed that the regulated pressure isn't near the tank pressure although it seems that it should be. Any ideas of what to check and how, Greg?
 
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Old 08-14-03, 06:01 AM
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Joe:

The regulator should only go to about 100 psi, 125 max.
The compressors that use high pressure to compensate for a small air tank usually never make this pressure available, as all air tools are designed for 100 psi and would be damaged at anything much higher.
So if you can't reach 100 psi then the regulator could be defective.

That air leakage rate is not bad but you could check the check valve if you havn't already. It's in the line between the pump and the tank.Might be dirty or the seat could be worn. Seats with a teflon surface will hold indefinately if in good condition but brass ones won't.
Another thing is the regulator if nothing is plugged into it. Try backing it off all the way or as an experiment remove it and put in a plug.

My system is fairly tight, has a 60 gal tank with a 60 gal reserve tank and is on all the time. With that volume it comes on about once a day to make up the pressure.
Maybe you could hook-up an auxiliary tank to allow the pressure to remain longer and improve the cycling of the unit.
 
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Old 08-14-03, 06:26 AM
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Greg:

The tank pressure cuts off at 90 psi or so, pretty much like how the booklet states it should.

The gauge regulated pressure is somewhere around 40 to 60 PSI

(there are two gauges---tank pressure, regulated pressure).

The regulator is a new unit from Sears (DeVilbiss).

As for the "check valve", do you mean the safety valve? There is a brass device with a "key ring" pull on it (Like how a fire extinguisher has a pull pin). Is this what you mean? What key # is it on the Sears diagram? (have a look at Sears.com, then parts then 919-164180).

---Another thing is the regulator if nothing is plugged into it. Try backing it off all the way or as an experiment remove it and put in a plug.

I'm not sure what you mean by the first sentence?
You're right, it's probably more of an annoyance than a fuctional issue. However, the compressor is new (I got it from a neighbor who never used it), so I'd like to get what I can out of it. For $60, brand new, I couldn't pass it up
 
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Old 08-14-03, 02:15 PM
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Joe:

The one way or check valve is item # 17.
If you remove it and can get it apart you can clean it and check to see if it has a brass or teflon seat.

I meant "by nothing plugged into it" you would make sure it's not a hose plugged into the regulator that is leaking and if you remove the regulator and cap the line you would eliminate the regulator from the leak test.

Another trick: Build the pressure up in the tank and let it shut off. Unplug it and carefully remove the discharge line at item # 33, let the little bit of pressure in the pipe vent and see if the check valve is leaking back. You can then see if it is leaking by smearing soap bubbles over the end of the fitting.
Be carefull though and go slowly as there will be 100 psi on the tank side of the check valve.

If the cut-out is at 100 psi or so a more efficient set-up would be to have two quick connects. One for regulated pressure and one direct to the tank to reduce pressure drop when using high draw tools.

As far as the regulator only going to 60 psi, if it went higher then maybe the regulator spring is worn or it's dirty inside.
 
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Old 08-15-03, 03:54 AM
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Hi Greg:

Don't know if it's SUPPOSED to be higher? I can call DeVilbiss and ask for sure (since it is their compressor).

I will investigate what you've laid out here (eventually..lol) and se if I can get to the bottom of it.

Only thing I can think of is that I used some teflon paste (like you would pipe dope) on various connections and maybe something clogged the works. Hmmm.

(It said it was suitable for air lines on the bottle).

Thanks again.
 
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Old 08-18-03, 12:07 PM
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Greg:

Devap told me:

Dear Joseph,
First I would like to thank you for purchasing a DeVilbiss Air Power
Company air
compressor. We recommend that you make sure to drain the air compressors
after every
use to release the pressure and condensation that occurs. The reason for
the bleeding off
is going to be the check valve. The current check valves do have a Teflon
diaphragm.
Should you need to contact us again in the future, please call
1-800-888-2468, or click on
the following link: http://www.devap.com/company/email_form.asp
Upon contacting us, please refer to case number 856023.

Thank You,


Product Service Department

------------

I take it that I'm going to find a brass seat on my current check valve? What do I look for/clean it with when I get it apart?

If not, I will likely go for the newer valve which is what I believe the supersession on the Sears.com parts list shows (the original # goes to another #).

I will e-mail Devap and ask for some more clarity. They really didn't answer the question except seem to indicate the problem IS in the check valve .

Thanks for any help as well as what you have provided thus far!
 
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Old 08-18-03, 12:23 PM
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Joe:

What you do with the valve once you get it apart will depend on what the diaphram and seat look like. They call it a diaphram but it looks more like a flat disc, and one I've seen had a ball, seat and cage affair with a spring to keep the ball/disk in position.
You could use something to cut the grease and if appropriate use an abrasive and even lap it if it's brass on brass.

Hey, maybe it'll be a teflon one in there already and it's leaking somewhere else.
Do the leak test on the check valve with soap to diagnose.
 
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Old 08-19-03, 10:16 AM
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Thanks Greg.

Will get into it one of these days soon---currently involved in fixing my grandfather's 1975 gas dryer (see the electric appliance forum for more details).
 
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Old 08-19-03, 10:40 AM
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Exclamation What!

It broke so soon?
 
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Old 08-19-03, 10:52 AM
Joe_F
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Talking

Yea, dang it, never been fixed since 1975. I tell ya! LOL.

(And it's so far being repaired for under $75, that's including a new flex hose, adapters, pipe, duct AND the part to fix the burned ignitor! . )

Count the supplies out for the duct and the supply line. That's me being anal and safety conscious.

$30 to fix the machine in all reality.
 
 

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