Reciprotacing Saws

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  #1  
Old 10-18-03, 07:50 PM
millertime
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Reciprotacing Saws

I think im gonna finally break down and buy one

please answer the 3 questions below, as well as anything else you might have to say.

the make, and model of your saw
what you like about it
what you dont like about it.





thanks alot for the input
 
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  #2  
Old 10-19-03, 06:50 AM
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millertime:

1. Milwaukee - corded
2. Relatively inexpensive, lasts forever, lots of power.
3. Cord

1. Milwaukee 18 volt battery powered.
2. Instantly available for use without looking for a plug or extension cord, as much power as corded model.
3. Fairly expensive to purchase. Batteries don't really last that long, a couple of years at best.

Conclusion:
Because I use the battery model quite regularly in commercial service, the cost of battery replacement is not significant.
For occasional use a quality corded model would be a lifelong investment.
If comparing models and the specs are available, generally a longer stroke cuts better. A friend has a DeWalt 18v recip and you can hear the difference in the sound the tool makes with the shorter stroke of his tool.

Milwaukee is my preference in this type of tool and trades around here almost all seem to use them.
I'm sure though that other high end makes would work as well and last as long.
 
  #3  
Old 10-19-03, 07:05 AM
Joe_F
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Craftsman Professional 6.5A #27501 or #27502

USA made, corded.
Dewalt in disguise (900 model prefix are made by B&D/Dewalt for Sears)
Came with case, gloves, extension cord, safety goggles and 5 blades.
Was $65 or so with a bunch of coupons I had from Sears.
Dewalt has been great in answering any questions that the manual left out.

I have gone through tree limbs like butter with it, as well as fenceposts. Dropped them like flies.

Would be nice if it had a keyless blade removal, but it's not such a big deal for me.

I like it.
 
  #4  
Old 10-19-03, 08:50 AM
SalvageCzar
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I'm old enough to remember when these tools first came out and the tremendous impact they had. They weren't so cheap at first and blades were often hard to come by, but they were worth their weight in gold. Going cordless, and the keyless blade holders are the two best things to happen to them. I have nearly every make or model made and use them every day for recovering items from houses for my salvage yard. Best tool for cutting out old sinks, clawfoot tubs, wrought iron rails, mantles and the like. Now, me, well I like my brand new PortaCables best. That keyless blade holder is AOK in my book, but the Milwaukees I have are older than some of my kids and they just can't be killed. I like the DeWalt we have too, shorter and narrower and good for tight spots. I have a strong opinion on blades. The machine you choose is half the equation - blades are the other half and in some cases probably more important. I only use Lennox, and choose the right blade for the job. The right blade, the teeth per inch really matters!
 
  #5  
Old 10-19-03, 10:11 PM
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I agree...Milwaukee...hands down.

I own the corded model

It is quite strong, never gives any trouble, has never been inadequate for any task I asked it to perform, has a long enough stroke and quick-release blade chuck, and it's well built.

There's really nothing I dislike about it.

I don't think you'll find another recip. saw that compares to the Milwaukee sawzall.
 
  #6  
Old 11-03-03, 06:02 PM
Stanthetoolman
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Sawsall

Milwaukee
Is the best. The newer ones are so well balanced. The vibration difference is incredible. I have used B&D, Porter Cable, Dewalt. Cordless, sure if you like to lug around a heavy 18V battery. Then wait till you have to replace one. You are almost half way to buying a corded Milwaukee. Lenox blades are the best.
For everyday use get the quick change blade holder. For occassional usage the screw and clamp work just fine.
 
  #7  
Old 11-04-03, 08:37 PM
NutAndBoltKing
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My suggestion may be too late for consideration, but if you're looking at Milwaukee check out their "Hatchet" before buying.

The Hatchet is a sawzall, 7 amp or so, with the Milwaukee heart and guts, but it has a pivoting handle, and that allows you to get into very tight spots, even between 16" OC studs and joists.

A customer let me try his out tonight - GRRRREAT!!!
 
  #8  
Old 11-06-03, 10:38 PM
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You'll die trying to rip my Milwaukee corded Sawzall (the Anniversary edition) out of my hands.

Granted, the 1-1/4" stroke is too much at times -- that's where my DeWalt comes in, with it's 3/4" stroke.

But power, 5 speed ranges, variable speed trigger, twist lock (no tools needed) blade release, and a soft bag to carry it in -- TOPS!!!
 
  #9  
Old 11-07-03, 06:10 PM
rob1kva
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Thumbs down

Porter Cable corded, its about 5-6 yrs old but runs & looks like new. I have a few P.C.tools that I'm very happy with. The Co. has been around a long time & make quality tools. If you work in construction you might consider the speedlok {I think thats its name} a spring loaded blade holder which makes blade changing super fast. Only Milwakee & P.C. have this feature. P.C. recently came out with a new recip saw whereas the tool head pivots making it easier for tight spaces,very neat.
 
  #10  
Old 11-08-03, 05:30 AM
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Millertime,

I think everything got pretty much covered. If you have purchased the saw, what did you get?

If you are still "shopping", consider how much you will be using the saw and what for. That will determine how much you need to invest in it. If you will be using this saw a couple times a year, spending the $200 for something like the Anniversary Edition of the Milwaukwee Sawzall is overkill. But, if like mine, it is something that gets used several times a week, going with a cheap one isn't in your best interest. You'll be replacing it, a lot!

Like I've always said, I can't afford cheap tools!
 
  #11  
Old 11-08-03, 06:13 PM
millertime
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Originally posted by lefty
Millertime,

I think everything got pretty much covered. If you have purchased the saw, what did you get?

If you are still "shopping", consider how much you will be using the saw and what for. That will determine how much you need to invest in it. If you will be using this saw a couple times a year, spending the $200 for something like the Anniversary Edition of the Milwaukwee Sawzall is overkill. But, if like mine, it is something that gets used several times a week, going with a cheap one isn't in your best interest. You'll be replacing it, a lot!

Like I've always said, I can't afford cheap tools!
No, I havn't bought the saw yet. I havn't even decided between corded and cordless.
 
  #12  
Old 11-08-03, 09:12 PM
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Corded or cordless -- tough choice!

They each have their advantages and disadvantages.

Upside to a cordless -- it goes everywhere and doesn't have the nuisance of a cord.

Downside -- the batteries go down fast. You'll deplete the charge on the battery in about 1/3 the time that it takes a screw gun to run it out.

Upside to a corded -- More power, and it won't die half way through a cut when you are under a house (or in an attic) and 75 feet from the crawl space.

Downside -- the nuisance of the cord.
 
  #13  
Old 11-09-03, 05:35 AM
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Batteries are the biggest headache with cordless.
My two year old 18 volt Milwaukee recip is indispensible in commercial service but I'm looking at replacing the batteries this year at a price of $100.00 CDN each.

If you can afford the battery replacement I would go for the battery one.
 
  #14  
Old 11-09-03, 02:49 PM
millertime
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I am beginning to lean towards corded, as it is only an occasional use tool.

I liked the idea of not having to haul the cords out everytime I need to make a cut, but then I thought about the downside to a cordless drill, and nuisance of charging them (and the life of a battery).


So now I am thinking I should just get a really good corded model.
 
  #15  
Old 11-11-03, 12:32 PM
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I bought a Milwaukee 6507 Sawzall 16 years ago (cordless not even available back then). I'm on my second whole-house remodel, and it hardly looks used. It's the one tool I don't mind loaning out t friends because I know that nothing can hurt it.

The new Sawzalls have quick-change blade holders and more power, but my old one has never failed me whether cutting out studs or through iron pipe. I also use it to cut rebar. I think the short stroke (3/4") is an advantage when bending the blade over to cut nails off flush.
 
  #16  
Old 11-11-03, 06:10 PM
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My Dad a plumber had a Sawsall for 20+ years. It was all metal not like the ones they make today. It finally gave up so I bought him one of the newer versions. It lasted about 5 years and was junk.

He bought a PC tiger saw, he fell in love with it. He says it cuts much faster than the Sawsall. The PC has that raking action that speeds cutting. Also swear by Lenox blades

Larry
 
  #17  
Old 11-11-03, 09:53 PM
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"The PC has that raking action that speeds cutting."

You're talking about orbit. Some Milwaulkee models have that too, and yes, it DOES speed up the cutting. On the Anniversary Edition (mine) I can use the orbit or turn it off. (It's easier and cleaner to cut a curve or circle without the orbit.)

The Quick - Lock system for changing the blade -- NICE. A thumb and an index finger to roll the collar, and the blade is changed. Also love my detachable cord. I have both the 10' and the 25' cord for it. No extension cord to come unplugged in an attic or under a house when I'm 15' from an outlet, and no plugs to get tangled on things or hung up on a corner inside a house.

Those are features, and they come with a price. If's it's still available, the Anniversary Edition Milwaulkee is going to set you back $200. If you will be using it enough to justify the cost, that's fine. (I spend an average of $10 a week on blades for it!) But if you are only looking at using it one a project once every 6 months, then investing $75 to $100 in the tool is probably more what you need.
 
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