brad vs. finish

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Old 12-09-03, 10:32 AM
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brad vs. finish

I'm told you use a brad nailer for furniture and small trim and you use a finish nailer for large trim, like baseboards.

I'm hoping to avoid buying two nailers, so can I push the limits of a brad nailer and use it on baseboards and other large trim? What if I used liquid nails and then a brad nailer for the larger trim?
 
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Old 12-09-03, 01:29 PM
mark8076
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Lowes has a Senco Finish Pro 35 finish nailer in a kit that comes with a free Senco crown stapler that drives a 1" finish staple. Both for $199. I just bought one.
 
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Old 12-09-03, 04:26 PM
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A finish nailer will shoot as small as 1.25 inch nails. A brad nailer seldom goes much above that. Baseboards go down with #6 and shoe molding goes down with #8. Not much of an environment for a brad nailer. A finish nailer is much more versatile all around than a brad nailer, in my experience.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 12-09-03, 09:55 PM
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My inexpensive 18 guage brad nailer will shoot up to 2".
They hold baseboards very well and if I buy colored head brads they don't need filling.
 
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Old 12-10-03, 12:21 PM
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I have an 18 ga Bostich brad gun that handles brads from 5/8" to 2". I use it for trim, moldings, baseboard, door & window casings, etc.
 
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Old 12-10-03, 02:38 PM
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What I like about the 18 g is that it's narrow enough that it will never split the wood.
 
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Old 12-10-03, 08:22 PM
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Well, almost never .

Really thin stock sometimes splits if you get too close to the end. I've been known to reduce the air pressure and let the brad drive a little proud, then finish it with a nail set
 
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Old 12-11-03, 07:35 AM
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Palm nailer

Sounds like a brad nailer will work. Do folks think a palm nailer is a good option for a DIY'er like me. It seems it wil drive any nail, but lacks for speed. Since I'm slow anyways, why not
 
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Old 12-11-03, 10:59 AM
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I've never used a palm nailer, but have seen them used. Looks like they're great for working in tight spaces. They also look like a sure-fire way to get carpal tunnel syndrome.
 
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Old 12-17-03, 08:16 PM
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You will find that a good finish nailer has a soft/larger shoe than a brad nailer. The brad nailer may leave unwanted marks in your molding because of it's sharper shoe...especially if you apply pressure with the brad nailer to force a molding down.

jimmymc
 
 

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