what tool should I buy?

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-30-03, 05:44 PM
actonwang
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
what tool should I buy?

Hi,all gurus:

question about buying tools:

I want to do sth by myself like many do here. The first
thing to do is to buy some tools. Cordless drill and screwdriver
and saw, etc.
I searched the homedepot and now have :
1. Should I buy 6 volt or 12 volt or 18 volt tools? What will
account for the choice?
2. Does brand make difference? There are :
Black&Deck, Rigid, DeWalt ... lots of brand. Which one is
good deal.

Consider me as a just do-it-selfer. Please give me some
advice on it.

Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-30-03, 07:27 PM
Dave_D1945's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 1,178
Boy, will this question open the old worm can.

Tool selection involves many things including price, amount of use they'll get, and how they "feel" to the user.

IMHO, DeWalt, Porter Cable, Milwaukee, Hitachi, Makita and Ridgid are great tools - if you're using them all day, every day. Like Timex, they take a licking and keep on ticking. All that durability has a price, though.

For a DIY'er, I would recommend mid-range tools like Ryobi, Black & Decker or Craftsman. If I were just beginning to buy tools, I would go with one of the combo packs (circular saw, sawzall, drill, and light) in 14.4v. They have plenty of power for almost anything you'll do and they're not as heavy as the 18v tools. I would pass on anything under 14.4v.

Since cordless technology is improving at a fairly fast pace, by the time you need new tools, they will probably have even better tools for the same money.

A totally subjective factor is the "feel" of the tool. Go to a home center and handle different brands. Imagine using them and see how they feel to you (balance, weight, etc) Try to refrain from closing your eyes and saying "Vroom, Vroom", though.

I went thru a similar process a few years ago when I bought a plate joiner. I handled every one I saw and finally bought the Craftsman - based solely on the location of the power switch.

Happy Shopping
 
  #3  
Old 12-31-03, 01:01 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Maryland
Posts: 405
Everything Dave says is true. However, I get the impression you are some what young. A cordless screw driver is something you will use/need your whole life. The hidden cost is the battery packs which eventually wear out and are "NOT" cheap!
I would suggest you go to Home Depot and look at the "Ridgid" line of tools. If the screw driver is to your liking ask the salesman if it "STILL" has the lifetime warranty on parts and labor including the batteries. If he says it does, buy it quick and never look back! It's a heck of a deal!
Changeling
 
  #4  
Old 12-31-03, 03:24 PM
Dave_D1945's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 1,178
changling is right about the Ridgid cordless drill. I've heard that the lifetime warranty ends in the next few days. He's also right about the battery issue. A few years from now, you may find that your batteries don't hold a charge as well as they used to, or you don't get the power you did before. In a 10 year life of the tool you'll probably go thru 2-3 batteries and they are pricey! I went thru 4 batteries for my old 9.6v Makita before it wore out - after 18 years.

Another thing to think about is who makes the tool. DIY is going thru a boom market and lots of new players are getting into the game. Ridgid came on the market a year ago, or so. They've been known for years for their excellent pipe tools but this was a new market for them. Since they've been around this long, I expect them to stay. Panasonic is another newbie in the tool market. I've always liked their electronics, but I'm a bit leery of their commitment to the tool business. Today, at Home Depot, I saw a line of cordless tools by Hilti. I've used their fastening products for years, but didn't know that they were now in the cordless tool business.
 
  #5  
Old 01-03-04, 05:30 PM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 125
I also recommend an 18V combo kit--you'll use it for years and years. If you can't afford the $350-500, however, don't make the mistake of buying down into the "mid-range", you want professional quality tools that will last and never let you down.

If cost is a factor, pick up a Makita 6095 9.6V cordless drill. This tool was introduced in the 80's and for a decade was the #1 choice of contractors and maintenance departments everywhere. It is probably the one that Dave is referring to; everyone seems to have owned one. Mine is still going strong after 17 years and two full-house remodels, and I've found the batteries to last about 7-9 years if I run them down all the way before recharging.

The 6095 is finally being phased out, which means you can get a bargain. Amazon offers a kit with drill/driver, flashlight and 2 batteries for $89.99, which is much less than the other units discussed in this thread. I expect batteries to be available for years to come, given the millions of these drills sold. I mention this to save you from buying a "mid-range" POS from Sears or Black&Decker.
 
  #6  
Old 01-05-04, 11:22 PM
millertime
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
These are the first 2 power tools you should get
1)a corded circular saw (makita is the saw I see around the job the most),
2))a cordless 12 or 14 volt drill (I will let someone else touch on these, as I have only used dewalt)

all the other purchases should come when you are trying to do something and you dont have the right tool.
 
  #7  
Old 01-06-04, 12:03 AM
Four Mad Men
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally posted by millertime
These are the first 2 power tools you should get
1)a corded circular saw (makita is the saw I see around the job the most),
2))a cordless 12 or 14 volt drill (I will let someone else touch on these, as I have only used dewalt)

all the other purchases should come when you are trying to do something and you dont have the right tool.
This works especially well if you have a wife who wants something done around the house/yard. I've started many projects with "You know, if you want this done right I'll need...".

Now onto the question:

The best money I ever spent was on my Dewalt cordless drill and I couldn't get anything done without my Delta 12" compound miter saw. A good circular saw can't be beat either (in this case I would recommend Porter Cable).

I've got a few DIY grade tools but mostly I try to by Contractor grade as they generally work better and most definately last longer. And you don't have to break the bank these days to get a tool that will serve you well for a lifetime.
 
  #8  
Old 01-06-04, 06:41 AM
Dave_D1945's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 1,178
Yesterday, I saw a display of the Makita 6095 cordless drills at $89 and change. They're probably clearing out their inventory but this would be an excellent buy. I would definitely get at least one extra battery since they'll probably become scarce when Makita discontinues this model.
 
  #9  
Old 01-06-04, 09:38 AM
millertime
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally posted by Four Mad Men



Now onto the question:

The best money I ever spent was on my Dewalt cordless drill and I couldn't get anything done without my Delta 12" compound miter saw. A good circular saw can't be beat either (in this case I would recommend Porter Cable).

I disagree. Unless you are installing interior trim, most jobs can be done with a skill saw and a jig.
You can frame an entire house with a circular saw and a chain saw. So unless you are going for neat cuts, the circular saw is really all you need.
 
  #10  
Old 01-06-04, 01:29 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 152
I use my 12" sideKick and my old trusty B&D circular saw. Together, you can rule your work shop. In my opinion you can't compare the two anyways, unless someone has figured out how to cut a sheet of plywood with a compound miter saw!
It's funny though how some tools can last forever, I've been looking for a excuse to replace my circular saw. 30.00 wonder just keeps going and going. And trust me, the thing has been abused! As far as tools go, it really depends on what you're looking to get out of them. I have a 12 volt Milwaukee and a 12 volt DeWalt drills. I like them both, but, if I had to choose I would recommend the Milwaukee.
 
  #11  
Old 01-06-04, 03:03 PM
millertime
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally posted by weebee
I use my 12" sideKick and my old trusty B&D circular saw. Together, you can rule your work shop. In my opinion you can't compare the two anyways, unless someone has figured out how to cut a sheet of plywood with a compound miter saw!
It's funny though how some tools can last forever, I've been looking for a excuse to replace my circular saw. 30.00 wonder just keeps going and going. And trust me, the thing has been abused! As far as tools go, it really depends on what you're looking to get out of them. I have a 12 volt Milwaukee and a 12 volt DeWalt drills. I like them both, but, if I had to choose I would recommend the Milwaukee.
I believe you can compare them. the cicular saw is more versatile, and can do most of the miter saws jobs. BUT, you cant use it effectively for interior trim, and crown moulding and that kind of stuff.

All I am trying to say, is that you can do a lot more than you first think with a circular saw. It is probably one of the most versatile saws you can have. A top quality Makita circular saw will run you no more than 150 bucks, and it will last for years. A decent miter saw is twice that.
 
  #12  
Old 01-06-04, 03:07 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 152
No doubt, I was just making fun!
 
  #13  
Old 01-06-04, 08:52 PM
millertime
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally posted by weebee
No doubt, I was just making fun!

ok
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'