leather strop


  #1  
Old 02-13-04, 10:23 AM
Bonny
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leather strop

When making a strop for honing carving blades, is it the smooth surface or the rough surface that does the honing?

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 02-13-04, 04:49 PM
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Smooth
 
  #3  
Old 02-19-04, 03:25 PM
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I applied some stock rubbing compound (got mine from Brownell's) to the smooth side. Rubbed in just enough to change the color of the metal. I can sure tell it's working, because the strop turns black very quickly. It sharpens and polished much more quickly than plain leather, and can often touch up a blade between sharpenings.
 
  #4  
Old 08-26-04, 10:28 AM
LazyPup
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I am a serious woodcarver who presently has about 200 various wood carving chisels and gouges.

I prefer to use the method that is recommended by scourby Tools of london, england (perhaps the worlds leading producer of fine woodworking chisels.)

Even brand new chisels require intitial honing and polishing before use. It is a very slow and tedious process which often takes 10 to 12 hours for the first sharpening. Once the chisel has been honed and polished it should only require polishing on a strop to keep it in good working order.

When sharpening a high quality wood chisel, absolutely do not use a powered mechanical sharpener.

The proper technique is to hand hone with successively finer abrasive stones.

I commonly use a 10,000 grit japanese water stones.

You should use small stones called slips that have shaped sides to math the angles on your tools.

YOu must maintain the angle of the blade exactly as you draw the cutting edge. Do not push the cutting egde on the stone.

You should see a very fine wire form on the leading edge of the tool as you hone it.

You then polish the wire edge off on a leather strop.

To make a leather strop for carving tools begin with wooden paddle, and glue a piece of leather with the rough side up.

To use the strop you begin by charging the leather with white jewelers rouge. Jewerers rough is normally formed into a stick similar to a large piece of blackboard chalk.

Rub the jelers rouge on the leather vigorously.

Now, hoking the paddle draw the tool on the leather until the blade tip is polished mirror smooth. That is the sharpest that the metal is capable of.

If a quality gouge chisel is properly sharpened you should be able to cut a continuos curl in hard oak for a distance of one foot or more with only hand pressure.

Keep the strop handy when carving and repeatedly strop the edge after every few cuts, normally not more than ten to twelve cuts between stropping.
 
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Old 02-10-05, 09:44 PM
guyzer
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stroping

Now, how to make a strop. Get a 14-16 inch piece of 1x2 pine. Carve a decent handle in the first six inches, and leave the rest flat. Now get a chunk of leather at least 8-10 inches long and 2 inches wide (and not real thin). Glue the leather onto the rest of the stick.Ruff side down. White glue or contact cement work fine. Clamp or weight the thing down to set overnight. When set, use a sharp knife to trim off excess leather. Take the polishing compound as described above and rub it all over the leather putting on a reasonable coat. Every so often I will scrap off the old stuff and put on a fresh coat. Well, there you have it.
 
  #6  
Old 02-15-05, 10:16 AM
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OKAY - this is something I NEED to make. I have many chisels that I've never 'properly' sharpened. Please help me with more detail.
I noticed that you experts are divided on the 'rough' or 'smooth' side up. - So which is it - or doesn't it really matter ?
Also are we talking cowhide here, -or any other kind of leather?
Where would an amateur find this kind of leather ?

Way, way back my Grampa was a barber in Glasgow's main Rail station. I was fascinated by his set of six Solingen razors, which he always sharpened on a piece of leather like a large belt. It was about 1/4 thick by 3"X24" and hooked on the wall at one end and had a loop (for handhold)at the other end.

Do it Right - Do it once.
 
  #7  
Old 02-22-05, 01:12 PM
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Any pro sharpeners out there ???

So far we've got 3 for smooth and 1 for rough. -but the rough guy, LazyPup, sounds like he's done some considerable research.

Any more serious opinions please, before I try to make my strop .

Do it Right - Do it once.
 
  #8  
Old 03-09-05, 06:05 PM
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I used to have a strop from a barber's shop. It was made from two pieces of leather, one a little smoother than the other. and also a different color (to avoid mistakes). The smooth side was definitely out on each, with the suede sides toward one another.

Think about it - if you're trying to hone off a wire edge, and polish the remaining sharp edge to as smooth a point as possible, why would you use a rough (ok - uneven) surface? Further, an uneven surface would be difficult to load evenly with compound or rouge.
 
  #9  
Old 03-21-05, 06:21 AM
putzing
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I'm guessing there are different grits of polishing compound to put on the strop. Which grit do all of you recommend using on the strop?
 
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Old 01-27-08, 12:37 AM
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strop belt

I bought a man's belt at a thrift store to make a strop so I am also interested in knowing smooth side or rough side up?
 
  #11  
Old 01-27-08, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by forester503 View Post
I bought a man's belt at a thrift store to make a strop so I am also interested in knowing smooth side or rough side up?
Smooth, for sure.
 
  #12  
Old 12-14-08, 12:39 AM
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New Product Out

********** I use both sides of the leather I have one strop paddle with the leather glued smooth side down and the other with the smooth side up. The smooth side is hard to get a wax based compound to stay in place. So I use a chalk compound they sell for the smooth side and use the wax based compound for the ruff side. The chalk compound is a little strange but you would just have to try it yourself to see what I mean. It works and it takes a good rubbing of it every time you strop. This chalk compound does not make your strop turn black like other compounds. And when your done just dust your strop off with a tooth brush and any metal you lost that would turn black in grease, oil or wax just falls away. The wax based compound they sell works great on the ruff side for the leather. And they sell loaded strops now.
 

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  #13  
Old 12-19-08, 08:10 PM
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just found this thread and yes i know some of the posts are old but just curious have any of you used the cardboard sharping wheels? i really like them for knives using polishing compound.

life begins when the kids leave home and the dog dies
 
 

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