Wet Saw

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  #1  
Old 02-21-04, 06:22 PM
Beyond9
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Wet Saw

Purchased new 10" wet saw. I've being doing some tile work, and I've noticed that the blade tends to kick out when I was shaving off small pieces.

It's not allowing me to run a straight cut down the middle of the tile.

Not sure if the blade is warped, it is fairly new. Also, the blade is very secured (already re-tightened). How much life can one expect out of a good blade? How does one know when the blade needs to be replaced?

Appreciate any help.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-22-04, 08:17 PM
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With a new saw and blade, I doubt either are bad. You can check the blade by laying it flat on a table / workbench to make sure it is not warped. My thought is the blade you are using may not have the right matrix or diamond segments for cutting tile. Are you sure the blade is a specific blade for tile or perhaps one for concrete or even brick or block? If the blade is a concrete-style blade, cutting ceramic tile will cause the diamonds to wear, new diamonds will not be exposed and the blade will kick out.
 
  #3  
Old 02-27-04, 06:23 PM
Resaw
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Hi Beyond,

On the same note as ellersk. Make sure you have the right blade for the job at hand. If you have the brand of the blade, and a model number, or something that would tell us more about the blade. There are different types of tile blades. Some are just solid core, with no segments. and some have segments. But i think a tile blade is generally thinner than a brick and paver blade for example.

Now about your blade "warping" Or scooting....I know exactly what you are talking about. I have an MK 1080 brick and paver saw. AWESOME SAW. And it obviously has a brick and paver blade on it. Although mine is for brick and pavers, nothing stops me from putting a tile blade on it (the sliding table is what is the difference between the tile, and brick saws)

Anyway...When i am cutting a paver, and i need to shave it...if i push it, the blade will actually walk to the outside of the material i am cutting (we're talking shaving an eighth" off or so, sometimes a bit less) So instead of cutting through the material, the material finds it's self, between the blade, and a fence...or, if you are hand guiding it, it will just push the brick over.

ONE NOTE. IF you do this using a fence, it becomes MUCH MORE DANGEROUS. The blade can bind, and cause it to pull your sliding table through at a rapid rate...and with the saw i have it can also cause the saw to dig in, and actually lower the motor assembly (even if the nut is tight)

Now, it is my expierince (with rentals) that a worn blade can do this more. But i've found that if i am in a situation where i need to shave it, just take your time...and if you measured once and had to cut twice --->your bad.

A tile blade is a bit more slim in width than a brick blade, which leads me to believe it would be more flexible, which would also make me think that it can occur more often with a tile blade than with another blade.

And for fun's sake...which saw did you get?

Hope this helps, and sorry for such a long post. By the way...this is just my expierience, and am by no mean an expert. Hope any of this was of use.

Good luck.
 
  #4  
Old 03-01-04, 04:32 PM
Beyond9
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I appreciate the information.

The blade I am using is a diamond blade (non segmented) for tile cutting. Cannot identify any noticeable wear to the blade or damage. It is not warped.

CHICAGO TC250B-I
10" wet saw, 2.5 Horse Power
 
  #5  
Old 03-05-04, 06:30 PM
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As a geologist I do a lot of cutting various rocks, etc on wet saws. Some blades have a lot more life in them even after they seem 'dull'. Take an old grinding wheel from a grinder and do a couple 1/4 inch cuts into it. This often cleans up the blade and the blade will cut like new.

Also, if you have something 'wierd' to cut or some bizarre curve, etc. and don't a a clue where to turn, check out if your city,town has a lapidary club or society. Our club has a lot of seasoned fellows who can do amazing stuff with even the hardest materials. I've had to cut a rock to present a certain facet at a particular angle and they're usually happy to help out. The norm is to give them a couple dollars for the wear on their blades or grinders.
 
  #6  
Old 03-06-04, 06:58 PM
Resaw
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In adition to what Atrypa said, you can also take a piece of cinder block and cut into it to expose fresh diamond.
On a segmented blade, as long as there is still the diamond matrix part of the segment remaining, the is ussually life left in it.

I'm curious how you clean you saw, if you cut wet, obviously it will get a bit messy, and the best way i've found is spend a half hour and hose out the tray, and then wipe down the saw....very time consuming and frustrating. I like to keep up with it though, otherwise i can get out of hand.
 
  #7  
Old 03-06-04, 07:04 PM
Resaw
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Re-reading Beyond's first comment. About the fact that it will not cut a straight line? Is this only when you are shaving small amounts, or making a meaty cut? Just curious, cause if it is when making a meaty cut i don;t know what the deal would be, other than to make sure the sliding table is aligned properly, and does not have any wobble in it.

You can check if the blade is square with the table by using a speed square. Also make sure the table is not wobbly.
 
  #8  
Old 03-10-04, 06:09 PM
Beyond9
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I am making meaty cuts with the blade, and it does not keep a straight line--could it be the saw itself and not the blade?
 
  #9  
Old 03-11-04, 05:32 AM
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I have little experiece with wet saws but maybe this will apply.

In cutting steel with an abrasive blade I notice a tendancy for the blade to deflect in relation to how much pressure is applied.
In using 3/32 rather than 1/8 blades for less material removal, you must use very light pressure to keep the blade on track.
 
  #10  
Old 03-15-04, 03:37 PM
Beyond9
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Good thought--I did moderate the speed in which I fed the tile. The deviation still ocurred.
 
  #11  
Old 03-15-04, 03:59 PM
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Beyond9:

I would look at a couple of possibilities.

As long as the arbor and mandrel, or motor if direct drive are secure then it could be that the blade itself is causing the cut to wander and if so should be replaced.
The other possibility is that the tile is moving while the cut is being made.

If this is an inexpensive saw the blade may not be of the highest quality.
I would replace it a name brand quality blade.
 
  #12  
Old 03-15-04, 10:01 PM
Beyond9
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I've come to that conclusion--to replace the blade. I'll let you guys know how it turns out.
 
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