Framing hammers

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  #1  
Old 03-13-04, 05:51 PM
BrettD
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Talking Framing hammers

I'm planning on putting in some serious "sweat equity" during construction of our new house this spring, so I'll need to invest in a decent hammer. Need suggestions as to weight, design and maybe popular brand names to look for at Home Depot, etc.
Is 22oz. a standard? I've seen 28 oz. hammers, which make sense, since less blows per completed drives would result. Thanks for your input!
 
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Old 03-13-04, 09:17 PM
millertime
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a 28oz hammer also takes more muscle to move. and if you dont swing one everyday for a living. then you wont be swinging it all day.


Estwing makes really good hammers.
 
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Old 03-13-04, 10:33 PM
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There is only 1 hammer to buy, the Eastwing..

http://tools.aubuchonhardware.com/ha...mer-393800.asp
 
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Old 03-14-04, 12:11 AM
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28 is a hammer for the everyday user. Its good for downward nailing. The one i use is the Craftsman 23 oz California style framer. Home depot carry very much variety Estwing is the way to go.
 
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Old 03-14-04, 09:16 AM
BrettD
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Talking Framing hammers

Quote: "a 28oz hammer also takes more muscle to move. and if you dont swing one everyday for a living. then you wont be swinging it all day."

Good point, Kevin! I guess while I was lookin' at hammers I thought that since I wouldn't have to swing it all day, the extra head weight would be to my benefit! I could almost "drop" the thing on a 16d, three-four times and it's done. Just a theory I have. The difference in price between the 28oz. and the 23oz. CA framer is almost $10.00. So I could save some money if I took the big one back.
 
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Old 03-14-04, 11:55 AM
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If you're going to be doing a lot of frame nailing, invest in an framing nail gun. They are worth their weight in gold.
 
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Old 03-14-04, 04:07 PM
BrettD
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Smile Framing nailer

Last December I purchased a Bostitch N80CB-1 pneumatic nail gun for doing the bulk of the nailing. I was looking for a hammer for pounding in 16s and 10d s into strong tiea and duplex nails into the temporary and permanent truss bracing. I guess I am looking for something that has more heft and striking power than the claw-hammer I generally use, but not one that will put me in the hurt-locker from occasional use.
 
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Old 03-15-04, 06:52 PM
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I was in a local hardware store several years ago and they had a display of "Tim Allen signature "RRR"" hammers. More as a joke, I bought one of the chrome plated 16 oz. curved claw hammers. Heck, I didn't even use it for about a year, it was so purty. Then, one day I broke the handle out of my hickory handled everyday hammer and got the Tim Allen model out. It has a great feel (it has an axe-like handle) great balance and, when you get right down on the end of the handle with only about two fingers on the end, it drives 16d cement-coated nails about as well as my 24 oz (or is it 22 oz) Estwing. I believe the Tim Allen hammer is actually made by Hart. I liked it so well, that the next time I went to the hardware store, I asked about them and they scrounged up three more of them and I bought them for spares. Normally, I use pneumatic nailers but I do hand drive the cement coated nails when securing the second plate on double top plates. I also use a palm nailer to drive nails for hangers and other metal fasteners. Because I use the nail guns so much, I don't really drive that many nails by hand. I've found that my wrist and forearm just won't hold up to swinging a framing hammer very much. Besides, the framing hammers beat the heck out of my leg when I walk with it in the loop on my tool belt.
 
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Old 03-17-04, 02:32 PM
millertime
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Re: Framing hammers

Originally posted by BrettD
Quote: "a 28oz hammer also takes more muscle to move. and if you dont swing one everyday for a living. then you wont be swinging it all day."

Good point, Kevin! I guess while I was lookin' at hammers I thought that since I wouldn't have to swing it all day, the extra head weight would be to my benefit! I could almost "drop" the thing on a 16d, three-four times and it's done. Just a theory I have. The difference in price between the 28oz. and the 23oz. CA framer is almost $10.00. So I could save some money if I took the big one back.
when purchasing a good framing hammer, price doesn't matter.
 
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Old 03-17-04, 02:44 PM
BrettD
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Thumbs up price no object

Point taken, Millertime!
 
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