Use old motor and put on bigger air compressor tank??

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  #1  
Old 03-24-04, 04:03 PM
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Use old motor and put on bigger air compressor tank??

I have been doing my air compressor homework for a while. Money has not permitted me to buy what I want. However, I came across a freebie air compressor that a friend gave me. It's one of the typical ones with a small tank that lays horizontal and has the wheels and handle bar with the engine directly on top. Very small tank though. Not sure how old it is, but it is an oil lubricated unit, and appears to be pretty old.

Would it be possible/feasible to yank the engine and hardware on it and swap it onto a newer much bigger tank?? This could potentially save me some good money. what do you all think???

Where can I purchase tanks without engines?? harbor freight didn't seem to have anything to offer. Thanks in advance, Jeremy
 
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Old 03-24-04, 04:10 PM
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Sure you can install it on a larger tank. The motor will run longer to bring the pressure up. It will also stay off longer before it restarts.
Why don't you use as is? Is the tank damaged?
 
  #3  
Old 03-24-04, 04:19 PM
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The urge to modify is overpowering. I just was wondering if I could make it better for a nominal amount. More air volume also means less cycling of the motor right??
 
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Old 03-24-04, 04:27 PM
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Hello: Jeremy

One reason why air tanks, for the purpose of using with a air compressor are not sold seperately is for liability reasons.

Injured parties sue manufacturers for problems they themselves created by building their own machines. And they often win huge awards for their own neglect to protect themselves for danger.

Thus tanks have been removed from selling as individual parts. Sold as an complete air compressor assembly they meet all current safety standards. Which cannot be ensured when tanks are sold seperately.

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Old 03-24-04, 04:31 PM
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Good point. It's too bad that the few indeed can ruin it for the many, but that's the case too often.

I'll take that advice though, since I'm no expert, and keep saving for a real one. Just figured that I had a good oil cooled air compressor engine, ...figured I was halfway to spending nothing
 
  #6  
Old 03-25-04, 05:15 AM
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Originally posted by jthompson
I'll take that advice though, since I'm no expert, and keep saving for a real one.
You'd be better off. By the time you get all the hardware necessary to make this surgery, it'll be far from cheap. Also, keep in mind that a compressor motor is more or less matched to a tank size. There's a reason why you don't see a 1hp motor on a 60 gal tank or a 2-stage pump on a 4 gal pancake, etc. A drastic increase in volume will put stress on a smaller motor and it'll die sooner.
 
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Old 03-25-04, 05:37 AM
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Originally posted by markiz37


There's a reason why you don't see a 1hp motor on a 60 gal tank or a 2-stage pump on a 4 gal pancake, etc. A drastic increase in volume will put stress on a smaller motor and it'll die sooner.
Don't understand how it would stress the motor -- seems it would just take an inordinately long time to pressurize a large tank with an undersized motor. The annoyance factor alone may be enough of a deterrent.
 
  #8  
Old 03-25-04, 06:27 AM
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i bet you

A smaller sized motor is not designed to run long enough to pressurize a larger sized tank. It'll simply overheat
 
  #9  
Old 03-25-04, 07:26 PM
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Jeremy:

Replacing the tank on an old compressor will only affect the on/off cycles of the compressor as stated.
You will not gain any capacity using a bigger tank.

I personally get a kick out of putting a compressor together from scratch but would agree that you would not do this to save money.

If you decide to do this as a hobby, not to save money, I can tell you how to properly build one.
 
  #10  
Old 03-26-04, 03:01 AM
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If it helps, compressors and tanks are sold as seperate components at www.surpluscenter.com. or 1-800-488-3407.
 
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