mobile battery charging

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  #1  
Old 06-13-04, 05:48 AM
Tory
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mobile battery charging

I want to hook up my cordless battery chargers to a 12v power inverter in my
truck. I've been told it won't work because the wave sins are square off
the inverter and curved from household voltage. What do you recomend as
far as having a mobile charging station?

Thanks,
Tory
 
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  #2  
Old 06-13-04, 07:17 AM
GregH's Avatar
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Welcome and good question!

Your friend is right in that an inexpensive 12v to 120 v inverter puts out a modified sine wave.
Not all devices can be operated on this type of power but unfortunately I couldn't find a definitive list of exactly wht may or may not be powered with one of these.

Here is an excerpt on this from the invertersRus website :

"What is the difference between a modified sine and pure sine
wave inverter?
Modified sine wave power inverters are more portable than pure sine wave
power inverters, lighter, and lower in cost. If your device will handle
voltage fluctuations, a modified sine wave inverter should be considered.
Most devices that people typically wish to power will work fine with a
modified sine wave inverter, as a precaution, please contact the
manufacturer of your device to determine if it is compatible.

Pure sine wave power inverters motor's run cooler, last longer and provide
very clean power like you would receive from a power company. Devices
such as laser printers, digital clocks, and most medical equipment require a
pure sine wave inverter to run correctly. As noted above, as a precaution,
please contact the manufacturer of your device to determine if pure sine
wave power is required."
(From invertersrus.com)

I also checked the instructions that come with my 450 watt marine inverter and it says; "Certain battery chargers for battery packs with power tools can not be used. These chargers have warning labels stating that dangerous voltages are present at the charger's battery terminals."
So, I'm not sure if the modified sine is a problem or they are passing judgement on the dangerous voltages at the battery terminals.

I honestly havn't used my inverter much so am interested in your question.
If you post the make and model of the drill and charger I may be able to get some info on it.
Also, I have a soon to be replaced, DeWalt 9v drill that I could hook up to the inverter to see if it will even work.
 
  #3  
Old 06-15-04, 05:16 AM
Tory
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mobile charging

Thanks GregH for the reply,

I've tried to contact the manufactures via internet and I feel like I'm speeking japanese. The only answer I have been able to get is "We don't make a charger to plug into your truck". The makes are 18v ryobi and 14.4 craftsman. I've looked at new invertors at the store and they do say they can be used for rechargable batteries, nothing about sine waves. I just don't want to damage any of my batteries.

Thanks,
Tory
 
  #4  
Old 06-15-04, 05:46 AM
GregH's Avatar
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Tory,

If any damage were to occur it would be the charger, not the battery that would take the hit.

I personally would try it, especially considering there is nothing in the instructions recomending against it.
If either drill is under warranty it should be covered.
 
  #5  
Old 07-10-04, 05:28 PM
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Location: MI
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I have an inverter that I bought from Walmart a few years ago, not sure what brand but it was near the car batteries and I think they only had the one brand. It does work great for charging batteries though. I installed overhead garage doors for awhile and I would charge my batteries up on the way from job to job. I used Makita, Porter-Cable, Dewalt, and Ryobi drills. Never had a problem with any of them. Another great use for the inverter is cooking! I have a 1 quart crock pot and in the morning before leaving for work I would put my ingredients for that days lunch in it, and when ready I'd have a nice hot fresh lunch. I used it for making stews, soups, etc. It works just awesome for baking fish in it. So much better than a cold peanut butter & jelly!
 
  #6  
Old 07-10-04, 07:59 PM
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gohammergo,

The crockpot idea on an inverter is very clever.
The road cooking method I used in the "old days" was to put food wrapped in foil on the intake manifold of the van.
With your way you miss out on that wonderfull smoked flavor of the engine bay cook-out.
 
  #7  
Old 07-10-04, 09:27 PM
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I used to do my job site cooking on whatever heater we had on the job. The good old propane "torpedo" heater. At times I used a single burner coleman stove (which is still my favorite). I have even used those halogen worklights that are always running on job sites. My outlook has always been, that if a person had to be at work he may as well make it as pleasant as possible. And what better way than a fresh "home" cooked meal? But the crockpot is the easiest. Put the stuff in, plug it in, and it's ready to go by lunchtime. Like the great inventor says, "set it, and forget it".
 
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