Looking for a NEW Table Saw


  #1  
Old 09-23-04, 11:33 PM
titanxt
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Looking for a NEW Table Saw

Hello. I am looking to buy a fairly good, midrange priced table saw. I am looking at this particular model of Craftsman saw:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/produ...01510004900085

It seems to have some quality features without totally breaking the bank. Any and all suggestions are greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

Andy
 
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Old 09-24-04, 04:09 AM
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Andy,

If you're thinking about doing some woodworking, consider a contractor's table saw. They are a bit more money but more than worth it. Look at Delta and a couple others.

Craftsman: "T-slotted for miter gage" T slots are a pain!!!

fred
 
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Old 09-24-04, 08:20 AM
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Am interested in the same range of product as andy. Can you explain what the T-slot is and why it is a pain?
 
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Old 09-24-04, 02:46 PM
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Well, the T slot makes it impossible to lift the miter gauge straight up and out of the slot. Not a big deal, but you have to slide it all the way off the table to remove it. And, occasionally the slots will accumulte dirt/sawdust which makes it more difficult to slide. And some good attachments will not fit in the T slot unless they have changed their dimensions.
Most Contracors' Table Saws are standardized and will accept a host of excellent attachments.

fred
 
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Old 09-24-04, 03:05 PM
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I somehow lost the link that shows who makes which Craftsman power tools but I believe it is still Ryobi.

I agree with fred in that you would do well to look for something just a bit better.
I have a bias towards Delta because of their simplicity and the ease at which I can get parts and service, but there are other good ones out there.
Just lay your hands on them, try the attachments and get a really good look at the mechanism inside.

I have made a few custom mitre attachments that I have used in the standard groove plus a standard groove is also necessary if you wish to make a table sled.
 
  #6  
Old 10-19-04, 03:24 PM
L Elwood
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In my opinion dont get a crafsman saw, there quality is not very good, the table saw is the backbone of any woodshop, you should get the best you can aford, as was said in previous posts a quality contractors saw would give you many years of use. the fence on the table saw is very important, most cheap saws have lousy fences, which means they wont stay true. some good brands are, Powermatic, Delta, Jet, Grizzly. These are good saws for the money. http://www.grizzly.com/products/item...emnumber=G0444
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...&s=hi&n=229120
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...&s=hi&n=552970
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...&s=hi&n=552970
 

Last edited by L Elwood; 10-20-04 at 12:13 PM.
  #7  
Old 10-22-04, 05:43 PM
Catman
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Table Saw

Andy,

If you are planning on cutting hardwoods like maple, black walnut, oak, etc... I would upgrade to a larger motor as well as a better saw. I have a 10" delta contractor saw with a 1 HP motor and it will not keep up with my hardwoods. I am currently in the process of upgrading either to a 10" Powermatic 66 or a Delta Unisaw with a 3 HP motor for this very reason. I think you would be better off purchasing a higher powered saw in the log run. The incremental price is well worth it. Hope this helps

Dave
 
  #8  
Old 10-26-04, 08:12 AM
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hi
You can look here. I buy all my tools from them:
homier.com grizzly.com
cheer

Moderator note: Links removed
 

Last edited by GregH; 10-26-04 at 11:32 AM.
  #9  
Old 10-28-04, 08:19 PM
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My wife is the expert in these matters. I just supply the muscle and transport.

Just after Christmas last year she picked up a used Delta Unisaw (the old heavy, cast-iron style that is VERY stable)at a used industrial equipment dealer. Paid about $900 as I remember. She had to replace the bushings in the arbor, purchase a good (Forrester?) blade and make a minor repair to the fence, but the cuts she's made so far are spot on.

I love the look of new stuff (especially the newer Delta's), but I have to agree this was a good purchase.

Matt
 
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Old 10-31-04, 07:18 PM
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My 2 cents....

I'm not a professional, I'm more like a weekend warrior who loves my recently acquired building hobby. So far I've built a stick-built shed that is as solid as can be, I've redone several rooms in the house and I'm about to start a big moulding job for base, crown, windows and doors. Now I say big, but that's all relative, I live in a small house, but I don't have the time to devout to projects full time.

One of my issues is space, my workshop is relatively small - about 12x13'. Because of this, I can't get a full contratactor type saw in the room and do anything else. So while I recognize the value of such a tool, it is inpractable in my situation. I need to move the saw in place, then get it out of the way. A moveable base would be a solution, but I like the idea of physically moving the saw outside for outside projects. With this in mind, I went with a Dewalt DW744 - a portable table saw with a nice base.

I love the saw, but again, I'm no pro. I can cut an 8' piece of material with the fence (telescopes 24 1/2"), I've cut through lots of types of wood, including hardwood (15 amp motor), I've loaded a full dado set, basically it's handled everything I've thrown at it. Plus its relatively light, around 60 lbs. I believe.

I really love the telescoping fence, it has a rack & pinion design that makes accurate adjustments a breeze. For my upcoming project, I'm getting a better rip blade, can't wait.
 
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Old 12-19-04, 03:55 PM
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I was going to start my own thread

But I looked through and found a good one already going. I'm in the same boat, but I'm looking at the DeWalt 744 (as above) and the Bosche 4000-09. I would someday like to have a cast iron stand contractor table, but most of my projects are out and about. Can I get opinions on thewe two tables, or maybe one that is in the same category?

Thanks, I really appreciate it.
-Rob
 
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Old 12-20-04, 02:58 AM
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Getting back to what GregH said about T slots and contractor saws. Mine is a Delta 10" contractor saw and I thought it had T slots for the miter gauge. The bar runs in the slots and there is a round device on the bottom front of the bar that runs in a wider slot which forms a T. What's the story?
 
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Old 12-20-04, 05:18 AM
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older'ndirt

The story?
Are you wondering about Delta's having a T slot?

Yours very well could have a T.
My saw is quite old and has just a 3/4" slot.
I haven't really looked at more recent models to see what type of groove is in the table.

What Model is your saw and how old is it?
 
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Old 12-20-04, 07:23 AM
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My Delta Contractor saw, about 8 yrs old, does not have the 'dreaded' T-slot.

I've had both and just prefer a saw w/o the t-slot,

fred
 
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Old 12-24-04, 08:21 AM
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GregH
My saw is a model 34-444, purchased in 1987. It has the standard 3/4 inch slot for the miter bar plus there is a wider, thinner slot across the bottom forming a "T". A 13/16 inch metal disk, mounted to the bottom front of the miter bar allows it to track in this slot. The disk is removable so you have the option of not using it and thus have what you refer to as the "standard slot".
 
 

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