Drill Accessory

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Old 12-15-04, 10:19 AM
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Drill Accessory

Because I don't have a dremal, I need something like it. I am looking for a cutting wheel that can work in my drill. Basically to cut metal. An example of what I am going to use it for is to cut a square out of the metal cover of a computer case so I can install a computer case fan. And I can use it for future applications. Can you direct me in the right direction in finding one of these? Thanks...
 
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Old 12-15-04, 11:39 AM
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Hi Terminator,
- there's a number of these available at tool stores. I've seen 1 1/2" and 3" cutting wheels that fit a 1/8 or 1/4" arbor. -Of course, the big advantage of Dremel is the speed, which you can't get from a drill. A cheaper alternative is the Clarke CT4009 Rotary tool. I bought one for 42.95 (CDN). It comes with a flexible extension and 16 bits. Not quite as compact or smooth as Dremel, but half the price.
 
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Old 12-15-04, 01:13 PM
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Thanks Nomind! I put in a request to Santa for the Clarke CT4009

It does more than cutting, thats why I want it!
 
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Old 12-15-04, 05:39 PM
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Another way.

Terminator20,

My idea is that a small cutting tool like what you are looking for would be a painfull way of cutting a computer case.
I have used a Dremel tool and it does not have a lot of power, plus the heat of grinding will burn the paint.
It looks like a lot better tool in the commercials than it really is.

For that job you would have better luck with a jig saw.
If you drill a series of holes just on the inside of each straight line to start the blade, you will be done in no time.
After you cut the line you would just need to file the area where you drilled the holes.
You can also line the inside where the cut is being made to prevent scratching of the inside of the cover.
 
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Old 12-15-04, 10:20 PM
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Thanks GregH. I have a jigsaw, but, the blade is to large of teeth for that job, and it is really really dull. I would have to get a thin teeth blade like you would find on a bandsaw. But that idea sounds like it would work also.
 
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Old 12-16-04, 06:36 AM
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I vote with GregH on this one. You can get metal cutting blades for a saber saw that will do the job easily and fast.

I've tried using a Dremel with metal "cutoff" discs and shattered several before I finished.
 
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Old 12-16-04, 11:19 AM
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A tip on cutting with a jig saw.

For cutting metal that is the thickness you will be working with, a 24 tpi or finer blade would be ideal.
One thing that is important when cutting with a jig saw, especially metal, is to make sure the piece you are cutting is on a secure table, and apply a moderate downward force on the saw as you cut.
This will prevent the saw from bouncing around which will give you a more accurate and cleaner cut.
Find a piece of sheet metal or maybe someone has a computer case destined for the dump to practice on.
Oh ya, make sure you get several blades because they can easily break.

Click image:
<img src="http://doityourself.com/images/200x200/6047559.jpg">
 

Last edited by GregH; 12-16-04 at 11:32 AM.
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