Help with my first power drill

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  #1  
Old 12-30-04, 06:26 PM
cantoron
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Question Help with my first power drill

1st happy new year to all you.

All the threads in here are talking about cordless drill but what i want is a long life corded drill. I will use it mostly around house such as finishing basement. Should I get a hammer drill or just a normal drill? Which one will you suggest? Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-31-04, 12:22 AM
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Hi Cantoron,
- As you're just starting out and doing fairly simple finishing jobs, I think a good regular drill would suit you better. -The main purpose of a hammer drill is to drill holes in concrete, if you're not doing this there's no point in having one. Most hammer drills are much heavier than regular drills, and also need to use special bits when drilling concrete. Much better to just rent a real (ie Hilti) hammer drill for the occasional concrete job.
Look for a good brand name drill and feel it out in the store, try the trigger, heft it around to make sure it feels good in your hand ( just try to avoid 'vroom, vrooom' sounds while you do this hefting )

Good luck and let us know what you settle for
 
  #3  
Old 12-31-04, 03:55 AM
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In addition to nominds answer, I would suggest that for a longer feeling of adequacy to get a variable speed/reversing drill. If you don't get it now, you'll wish you had later. Biggest thing is how it "feels" in your hand. Good luck.
 
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Old 12-31-04, 05:42 AM
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just to elaberate a bit on the hammer drill aspect you can drill in concrete with a regular drill just fine one its just a bit faster with a hammer drill

I just drilled 16 5/8 holes thru concrete block walls with a non-hammer drill, no problem .

I drill concrete all the time with a carbide bit and a regualr drill .(18volt ryobi cordless )

the only time I rent a hammer drill is for large holes or a lot of pre cast concrete and the drill I rent is a heavy duty hilti type far beyond what you would buy .

I think the hammer drills offred at the home owner level are unnecessary hype


I would suggest you rethink the cordless aspect as you get more into it I think you will regret not having gone cordless.


but to answer your orginall question a medium quaility 3/8 " varible speed reversing corded drill will be just fine .
 
  #5  
Old 12-31-04, 06:08 AM
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My vote would be for a corded Milwaukee 3/8 variable speed reversible drill.

Skil also has some nice American Made product, but it is much lighter duty, but may suit your needs.

As others have mentioned, the proper bit in a regular (non-hammer) drill will put holes in concrete fairly well. If you plan to set more than a few anchors in concrete, get the Milwaukee drill.

Cordless is nice, but it can be a pain for the infrequent user because the batteries are dead when you want to use the tool.

If you want to get a combo rotary and hammer drill, then do not look at anything other than Hilti or Bosch. All others are noisy and slow in comparison. As others have mentioned, the combo set is much heavier and more expensive than a plain drill.
 
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Old 12-31-04, 06:59 AM
cantoron
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Thanks for your quick responde. I still have some question. Some drills have the clutch setting while others not. Is that important for drill/drive? The one i am checking is Dewalt Deluxe 3/8-in. 6A Drill(D21008K) but not support clutch setting.
 
  #7  
Old 12-31-04, 07:24 AM
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The clutch is just another part to break.

You can accomplish the same thing with a steady finger on the variable speed trigger.
 
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Old 12-31-04, 07:31 AM
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I set my clutch to the highest setting and just leave it there (read never use it )

just another gimmick in my opion
 
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Old 12-31-04, 02:51 PM
cantoron
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I check some of the VSR drills which have different speed and Amp. Some are 0-1200RPM 7Amp, others are 0-2500 RPM just 5.5Amp. Is there any relationship between speed and Amp? Someone told me that the high speed the better.

So which one is suitable for home use(maybe some drills in metal, concrete)?

HAPPY New Year Again!!!
 
  #10  
Old 12-31-04, 04:08 PM
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Higher RPM's are good for things like self tapping screws and drywall screws going into metal (like metal studs). The low RPM drill will do these tasks just fine.

Those high speeds won't be used in drilling wood and such.

A higher amp motor will give you more torque. Torque is what you need for larger bits and longer life.
 
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Old 12-31-04, 05:32 PM
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Hi Cantoron and Danski,
- not trying to nitpick here, but sheet metal screws and drywall screws do NOT require high speed as they seat. This is precisely the reason that clutches were put into drills for, so that you seat the screw in different media without stripping the thread hole. Ie. the screwing action eases as the screw beds in. This is very important in drywall and thin steel studs.
 
  #12  
Old 01-01-05, 12:04 AM
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Correct, sheet metal screws do not need high speed... but a drill that spins faster will start and set the screws faster.

I have not needed a clutch for the volume of drywall screws I have installed, watching the grip on the trigger has sufficed. If I was installing a large number of drywall screws, then I would look into a dedicated drywall screw gun, or at least a drywall screw setting adapter for a regular drill.

In my opinion, absolutely nothing beats an impact gun for installing screws in materials other than drywall. Faster, more control, no fussing with high and low speed range, less fatigue and minimal wrist twisting. Screwing a deck together? Don't waste time with a rotary drill. Trouble is, the impact guns do not drill so well.
 
  #13  
Old 01-01-05, 07:24 AM
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Go for the 1/2" drill

For a first corded drill, a 1/2" chuck Milwaukee is hard to beat.
While it's a bit heavier, doing things like mixing paint with a stirring rod is quite useful. Driving screws at 850 rpm is quite controllable, which is more significant than spinning them in at 2500 rpm.

As others have said, impact drivers and rotary hammers have their special place, but not as a first choice.

Start with the 1/2" Milwaukee, then get something lighter and less expensive, like a 3/8" Dewalt as a second purchase (corded) or a 14.4v impact driver (cordless).
 
  #14  
Old 01-02-05, 01:57 AM
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Hi Danski, Happy New Year,
- you missed the point I was making about clutches, high speed etc. You are obviously highly experienced in using your drill and have developed techniques for seating screws etc. - Don't forget the person we're advising, is on his FIRST drill , and doesn't yet know these techniques .
 
  #15  
Old 01-02-05, 05:30 AM
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No problem nomind.

I would still suggest the gold standard clutchless Milwaukee 3/8 VSR drill mentioned earlier.

My first drill was a homeowner special hand me down and the plastic innards self detructed. I then bought a Milwaukee 1/2 inch model... too big physically and too much torque for general everyday tasks (bigger is not always better), but it worked ok until I bought the Milwaukee close quarters model.

Neither of those drills had clutches, and I don't believe the new ones do, either. I find it to be more of a pain to fiddle with the clutch settings than to control the speed of the tool yourself. I have not used a corded drill with an electric brake, so unlike cordless models, control is key.

I use drills every day with my regular job. I have tried the clutch models, and I have found it to be unreliable in the long term. That experience was with a Skil cordless (employer supplied) and DeWalt (prior to them making everything in China)... maybe the newer ones are better. Maybe not. Lots more cheap junk made in China these days.

I believe in buying tools once, if possible. No money is saved buying them twice.

Do I own the 3/8 Milwaukee? No, simply because I also now have cordless tools that I use every day. I bought the 1/2 inch model many years ago. If I had to do it again, the 3/8 chuck is what I would buy now for a general all purpose drill. I have used them, and it is a nice, compact, well balanced tool with plenty of power.

Because cantoron mentioned a hammer drill option, I wouldn't look at anything but the Bosch standard chuck (not SDS) combo hammer drill/rotary drill. I have used Metabo, DeWalt, Milwaukee, Hilti and that Bosch for hammer drills. Next to Hilti, that Bosch is the best by far. Money well spent if you need a combo tool.

As far as high speed goes, yes, there are drill bits that work better with high speed. Carbide tipped bits designed to go through concrete using a standard rotary drill are an example. However, they will still work in a "lower speed" drill. Maybe you have figured out by now that there is no perfect drill for all situations, that is why there are so many to choose from.

So, what did you get?
 
  #16  
Old 01-02-05, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by cantoron
Some drills have the clutch setting while others not. Is that important for drill/drive?

Obviously I differ from others here...I personally love the clutch on my drill. I can set it such that a screw head goes EXACTLY as far into the material that I want. (Haven't tried it on drywall YET, but I have a drywall project coming up.)

My father, on the other hand, had the exact same model drill (we bought them at the same time) and he never used the clutch. I couldn't get him to try it. He just left it at the highest setting like others have mentioned. Only time his drills clutch was adjusted was when I was using it.


Clutch/no clutch is a personal decision. If you like the tool to help you be precise, its worthwhile, IMO.
 
  #17  
Old 01-02-05, 11:55 PM
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Hi Chirkware,
- I agree with you. It's a personal issue, I have 6 different drills, 3 w/o clutch, 1 corded and 2 cordless with clutches. I toook the time to figure out how the clutches work best ( great on 2 , mediocre on the other)and on the two, use the clutches frequently, they work great for me.
In my experience I've found that a lot of DIY'ers just don't want to admit that a machine (clutch) can do something better than they can
 
  #18  
Old 01-03-05, 06:55 PM
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Everybody has brought great points to this discussion,so I though I'd throw in my 2 bits. I've always relied on a clutch in my drills and never had a problem with them.A clutch combined with variable speeds only expands the tools versatility.I guess once you get into a habit they're hard to break.The only way to truly see how a tools features work for you is to try them,I recommend renting a drill with a clutch & one without.Then you can be in a better frame of mind when you go to buy.Good luck
 
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