Air-Nailer vs. Electric Nailer?

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  #1  
Old 01-19-05, 11:44 AM
hth
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Air-Nailer vs. Electric Nailer?

It sounds a stupid question: why do people prefer to use air-nailer? What's wrong with the electric-nailer? I am looking for one, home use, to put the moulding and door casing and don't want to put too much $$$ on it. A handyman said he bought inexpensive tools since he often looses them at job sites and he can toss them whenever it goes bad then buy new ones. Thx.
 
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Old 01-19-05, 02:49 PM
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The only way to know the difference is to try it.

The electric nailers may not have any adjustment. Whatever force the tool can generate is it, whether it is enough or not.

An air nailer has a depth adjustment, but that can be fiddled with by changing the pressure on the regulator if need be.

It is possible to get a decent deal on compressor/air tool combos, so shop around. A small air compressor comes in handy for other things- even just for air in the car tires.

If your job is that small, why not do it by hand or rent the equipment?

A handyman said he bought inexpensive tools since he often looses them at job sites and he can toss them whenever it goes bad then buy new ones.
Why throw profit away by losing tools? Baffles me. If you buy good tools, they last a long time. A disturbing and wasteful (both dollars and the environment) mindset when someone thinks buying cheap and throwing it out is a good thing.
 
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Old 01-19-05, 03:28 PM
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Most users of air nailers are construction workers. They usually do not have any electric to use when they get on the job. It's actually necessity rather than choice.
 
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Old 01-19-05, 03:59 PM
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hth,

I assume you mean the small electric plug in brad nailers that will shoot up to 1 1/4" brads.

I have owned a couple and they have very little power.
I spent more time fixing jams than driving brads because I was usually driving the longest brads that would fit.
If you happen to be installing oak moldings, you may not do it with an electric.
Also, I have found that if using an electric nailer far from a plug you need to have a very heavy guage extension cord because if there is any voltage drop the nail will jam.

I don't use this type of tool often so the inexpensive "throw away", 2", 18 g. brad nailer I have has served me well for many years.
 
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Old 01-19-05, 11:24 PM
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Hi hth,
- I agree completely with Greg, -lack of power. I have two different electric nailers ( bought before I had a compressor). I found that neither of mine would work satisfactorily in harder woods. Even my smallest, cheapest air brad nailer has easily twice the driving force, even at 30-40 psi.

Do it Right - Do it once.
 
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Old 01-20-05, 12:13 PM
hth
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thanks guys for the info
 
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