Mitre Saw Blade: 40 or 60 tooth?

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  #1  
Old 01-25-05, 02:41 PM
B-ham Gary
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Mitre Saw Blade: 40 or 60 tooth?

I'm about to start doing some trim work (base and crown) for the very first time. Is it really necessary to use a 60-tooth blade as opposed to the 40-tooth that the Dewalt 703 10" mitre saw comes with?

If it makes a significant difference, I'd be willing to pay for the additional trim blade. (I plan on using your typical MDF trim material.)

Thanks for your help!

Gary
 
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Old 01-25-05, 02:57 PM
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The more teeth, the smoother the cut and the less tearout on the edges. Try the blade you have on a piece of trim and see if you are happy with the results. Good luck.
 
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Old 01-28-05, 01:19 AM
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Hi B-ham Gary,
- in addition to Majakdragon's excellent advice, I'd also add that if you want your trim to look really good, select a blade that has minimal or negative hook. The teeth are angled slightly backwards and are great for avoiding tearout. I use an 11 degree negative 40 tooth on my 8 1/4 Elu for trim less than 3", and it cuts like a knife in butter. I love Elu .
For larger trim I use my 12 " DeWalt with a 15 degree neg. 80 tooth blade, and a balancer disc. (this reduces tip vibration)
In some cases, to get excellent results your blade may cost almost half as much as the saw.

Do it Right - Do it once.
 
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Old 02-02-05, 05:12 PM
jeepgal98
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If you are coping your crown corners, it definitely is better to have a smoother cut. I have a 12" makita and it came with a 92-tooth carbide blade and it cuts so smooth that you don't ever have to sand the cut. That said, it doesn't rip out the moldings, making the fit look really good.
 
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Old 02-20-05, 10:17 PM
Sawdustguy
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To get a nice clean cut, you want a blade that is an "Alternate Bevel with an negative degree rake. CMT "Orange colored blades' work really well. My 12 has 100 teeth and cuts like butter.
 
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Old 02-21-05, 06:30 AM
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Generally speaking, more teeth will give a smoother cut. Since MDF isn't fiberous (like real wood), your 40 tooth blade may be just fine. Minor imperfections can be filled and sanded smooth and should disappear when you paint.
 
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Old 02-22-05, 12:17 PM
B-ham Gary
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Thanks all!

I did end up buying an 80-tooth blade when I bought the saw. I've done one small bathroom as my experiment / learning room (new base and a two-piece crown). The 80T blade worked great.

I may try some paint quality "real" wood for my next room and see how that goes. The MDF dust is now all over my garage... but it is easy to cope.

I haven't even tried the 40T blade that came with the Dewault. I'll play with that on some 2x4 stock and MDF scraps to see how it performs.

Gary
 
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Old 02-22-05, 01:07 PM
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Hi Gary,
-before you try it with 'real' wood, note that both Sawdust guy and I suggested a negative hook blade. This makes a lot better cut in real wood when mounted in a mitre saw.

Do it Right -Do it once.
 
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