American Tools?

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  #1  
Old 02-14-05, 08:35 AM
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American Tools?

I see reference to buying American tools over German tools over Japanese tools. I would like to buy American, but sometimes it's hard to know. Other than Bosch being German, what are brands that are American and Japanese?
 
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Old 02-14-05, 09:56 AM
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hi
well most are made outside the usa
or there ship from other countries and assemble here in the us and place sticker on them made in usa

cheers

pg
 
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Old 02-14-05, 01:13 PM
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Hi J.M.C.
-I can certainly see why, and agree that Americans are better off buying American made tools.( economically, and looking at "the big picture")
However I almost always end up buying the BEST tool for the job (that I can afford), be it American, German, Swedish or even Malaysian. The name on the label no longer means much. Are you going to use an American saw instead of a Sandvik at the same price ? -Not me! -And how about Hilti and Metabo and Elu. Best tools of their kind ! For a while the best B&D and DeWalt heavy duty drills were made in Italy, I still have one, 12 years old and works better than any modern drill made in US.( for a comparable price)
- And isn't it significant that the US Army now uses an Italian made handgun ?

Do it Right - Do it once.
 
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Old 02-14-05, 06:32 PM
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Well, not to sound like a commercial, but doesn't Bob Vila say Craftsman tools are "made in the USA, guaranteed for life"? Craftsman tools are my choice anyway, regardless of where they make them.
 
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Old 02-15-05, 12:42 AM
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so nice to hear from somebody with an open mind.

- We've had SO many derogatory comments on Craftsman tools in these and similar forums I wonder when was the last time you tried to return a broken Craftsman tool ?
My last time, 3 years ago, on a $180 belt sander, 3 months old, cost me $36 in parts. - Never again.

Do it Right - Do it once.
 
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Old 02-15-05, 01:22 AM
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It might be more practical, and effective, to favour building materials local to your state or country. How many dollars worth of lumber will that foreign-made saw cut, after all? That's especially easy in Wisconsin, USA.
 
  #7  
Old 02-17-05, 06:36 AM
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American Tools

I always look for an American tool first before a foreign tool. I hate the idea of supporting a foreign country when they take such an anti-American stance, such as France, Germany and Canada. However as Nomind explained I look for the best tools and I do own a Hilti and a Bosch. I would say a majority of my tools are American. I own a lot of Milwaukee, Dewalt and Porter Cable. Even if a tool is assembled in another country, the main thing is where the profits go, such as Dewalt profits going back to Black and Decker. Craftsman has some good tools, but Sears doesnít make any of them and even though they are made in the USA it doesnít mean it was an American company made them. If you look at the model number of the sears product, the first three numbers tells you who made the product for Sears. Once you find the three numbers, look at this link and it will let you know the manufacture. http://www.edgeta.org/sears.htm
I have owned plenty of things from Sears and have never had a problem returning anything, but ever one has different experiences.
I always look for American made items, if I canít find an American product I always look for a country that is our true friend and helps us. I would rather support our country or an allied than an anti-American country.
Anyways to answer your question: Dewalt (Black and Decker), Milwaukee, Stanley, Snap On, Huskey, and Kobalt are all American. I am sure there are others. Black and Decker just bought Pentair Inc, which owns Porter Cable, Delta and a couple others, so they are still or are now are American tools.

This article covers a little bit about tool making http://www.team.net/www/morgan/tech/whotools.html
 
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Old 02-17-05, 08:50 PM
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HI Hawks,
- a very good and informative post , good links too.
However, although I don't want to start a controversy here, I must say I'm extremely surprised by the inclusion of Canada in your little list of anti US countries ? - was that a joke ??
We see our selves as friends and allies in general, to say nothing of being major suppliers of cheap wood, cheap electricity, lots of cheap water, and a major buyer of US products.

Do it Right - Do it once.
 
  #9  
Old 02-17-05, 11:47 PM
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In this thread we're even helping Americans who want to buy American, how allied can we get?
 
  #10  
Old 02-18-05, 03:17 AM
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How can Husky be American when the box says made in China?

Husky used to be made by the same folks that made Craftsman hand tools. Not anymore. Check the boxes before you buy.
 
  #11  
Old 02-18-05, 07:00 AM
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Husky Tools are made in China, but I believe it is Stanley who owns them, it is their cheap line. Tools are like cars, some of the parts can be made over seas, but it is where the bottom line profit goes. Because the company who ends up getting the majority of the profit (the parent company), gets to take that money and invest it back into that economy. Granite it would be better if the tools were made and assembled all in America and personally thats what I look for.

Sorry Nomind, I didnít realize you were from Canada. I have some Canadian friends and you have definitely helped me out in these post. So it is nothing against you, but you have to admit Canada is getting a little anti American, even a couple of my Canadian friends think so. Paul Martin is as liberal as they come. All I heard through out our elections is how the Canadians think we are extremely dumb if were putting bush back in the house. Aljazeera TV is aloud to play on TV, but it was a huge no no for FOX to even be suggested for TV, which now its on. And lastly as study done by someone in one of your own university how the Anti-American feeling is getting stronger among the youth, which is believed to be fueled by Canadian media. But on the other hand maybe the only news I hear from Canada is the liberal side, just like it is here in the states.

But over all any country that top three interests are fishing, drinking and hockey is OK by me because thatís my top three interests.
 
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Old 02-20-05, 12:57 PM
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Hi Hawks,
- apology accepted.
- You should be aware MANY of us in these forums are Canadian, Kobuchi and GregH to mention just two more !
I hear what you're saying in between the lines, but never be naive enough to believe all of what the media (American OR Canadian) has to say - the media has it's own agenda, as do politicians. That seldom includes listening to the real people that make up either of our countries.
Lecture over. -Peace !

Do it Right -Do it once.
 
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Old 03-07-05, 06:18 PM
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You have wonder do Asians buy American tools? Do European's buy American tools? I have to beleive they buy their brands just like they do their cars. So if an American wants to buy an American product he/she is accused of bigotry. Seems like a double standard to me.

Now to the brands...I think only the Crafstman "hand" tools are made here and have the good warrenty, the power tools have a differant warrenty and may be made over seas.

As for the other brands mentioned, most have now merged as forien owened mega comapanies with most tools being made in China.

Welcome to the new world order.
 
  #14  
Old 03-08-05, 01:37 AM
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Do Asians buy American tools? Occasionally they do, but Asian vs. American isn't really an issue over there... not to the consumer. I know there are some Asians who collect "Made in USA" just like some Canadians sport a kit full of yellow with DeWalt boldly lettered on all. But fashion aside, the American tools can't compete and don't seem to try much either.

I bought a good portion of my hand tools, blades & bits, etc. in Japan, and combed the stores. And just as there are countless Asian brands you'll never see in Kansas, so too in Kanagawa American brands are scarce. And likewise you can find a range of quality anywhere, with local prices to match. Sometimes I saw what looked to me like US dumping - shoddy junk from the States that if sold in America *should* read "China" on the label. And the Southeast Asian export of tools to Japan really is dumping on a huge ridiculous scale - Tokyo dollar stores overflow with these perversely cheap products which are tools *in fact* but not *in use*. Some Chinese tools exported to Japan could hold their heads up, though, just as some of the American or Canadian product could. But those seemed more the exception.

See, product manufactured for export is seldom on par with local product, anywhere.

For example, if you're in Japan and you want quality, you buy Japanese or Korean and it costs up to ten times more than other imports. If you want a one shot tool, then of course you buy Taiwanese or whatever (these are crazy cheap in Japan). Yet if you're in Taiwan and you want quality you can find it in expensive local Taiwanese brands that *dare not export to North America* because the stigma plus higher price yields only dusty product on the shelves. These Taiwanese companies leave export to the mass producers. I know an electrician who recently bought some tools in Taiwan. And one doesn't hear of Taiwanese blackouts or substation explosions, rather a lot of precision electronics like circuit boards coming out of Taiwan. Yet go into Lowes and compare two steel rulers - one made in USA for the domestic market, the other made in Taiwan for export to America- which one is accurate?

Then consumer preconception plays tricks too. Americans buy (or don't buy)Makita thinking it a "Japanese" tool but Makita USA manufactures locally, while many Craftsman tools for sale in America are made in Mexico but the ones made in USA trumpet this so give the brand an aura more American than Makita. As if Makita would even try to work against the consumer preconceptions of whatever particular country they design product lines to compete in. Makita USA does know the substance of this thread, and adjusts its strategy accordingly.

***

Nothing wrong with wanting to support the local economy, and tool purchase is one way to do it. But surely there's a good deal more wealth flowing in materials than the purchase of tools to process those materials (though some days I wonder). So Dremel proudly saying made in USA grows immaterial when we carve into $2000 worth of tiles with Chile stamped on the backs, and when laying a roof deck with Canadian plywood and a $50 Craftsman circular saw that may lay a dozen more roof decks in its lifetime we should ask "what's this economy?"

I guess the safe way is to buy the tools and then destroy them lest tempted to buy things for using them on.
 
  #15  
Old 03-09-05, 10:08 AM
Jkei3207
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Craftsman

I have to say, I love Craftsman. Any time I have ever had a problem with a Craftsman tool, no matter how small, It was always taken care of immediately. I always bring my tool (drill, table saw, ratchet, floor jack, etc) right back to the store and they always replace it immediately. That is what I call service. I never get a hard time, no receipt asked for, no long wait, they just replace it, and I leave happy. I dont care where they make there tools, as long as they keep me happy I shop with them.
 
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Old 03-11-05, 07:28 PM
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usa all the way

hey guys, i saw the title of american tools and i couldnt help but see what is being tossed around and i have to say i am somewhat discouraged by what i have seen. in my day to day life i talk to so many people about where they spend their money and it seems to me that most americans are so brainwashed by walmart prices that they just dont even think that buying foreign made goods has any impact upon them at all. if we keep on buying foreign made products then there is no reason at all for us to gripe when there is no one to hire us (americans). i cant say much for the canadians on this site but .....
each time i plan on a new tool purchase i spend some time to research what is the best deal and of course what brand/product is made in america. what i have found is that power tools aside, most any other hand tool/product has an american made version. my study was on plumb bobs.
the american version was about 25% more than the taiwan version. at this point it becomes an issue of choice and responsibility. i work in an american plant, i want people to buy what i make , not what paco makes or what sven makes, i want what jon smith made in milwaukee. not what tamvu made in taiwan. im sorry but as an american we have a duty to support our own. and that means buying american products. i have realized that there are many things (power tools) that are almost impossible to find which are made in america but.........as an american i feel it is my duty to buy the products which my country produces.
much of the time this requires more money ( to buy the american version) but i feel that is an investment in mine and my childrens future.
also there is much being said about tools versus the materials they are used on ie. american made saw for 50 bucks sawing through 2000 bucks of canadian lumber. if you are not going to take a stand on the tools you buy then you probly wont take a stand on the materials you buy. so if you just dont care weather or not your children can find jobs then just keep on buying the "best deal" and let me know where that gets you all
remember all .... the most potent vote is the one you make with your dollars and cents, not at the ballot box.
 
  #17  
Old 03-11-05, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by handigrguy
hey guys, i saw the title of american tools and i couldnt help but see what is being tossed around and i have to say i am somewhat discouraged by what i have seen. in my day to day life i talk to so many people about where they spend their money and it seems to me that most americans are so brainwashed by walmart prices that they just dont even think that buying foreign made goods has any impact upon them at all. if we keep on buying foreign made products then there is no reason at all for us to gripe when there is no one to hire us (americans). i cant say much for the canadians on this site but .....
each time i plan on a new tool purchase i spend some time to research what is the best deal and of course what brand/product is made in america. what i have found is that power tools aside, most any other hand tool/product has an american made version. my study was on plumb bobs.
the american version was about 25% more than the taiwan version. at this point it becomes an issue of choice and responsibility. i work in an american plant, i want people to buy what i make , not what paco makes or what sven makes, i want what jon smith made in milwaukee. not what tamvu made in taiwan. im sorry but as an american we have a duty to support our own. and that means buying american products. i have realized that there are many things (power tools) that are almost impossible to find which are made in america but.........as an american i feel it is my duty to buy the products which my country produces.
much of the time this requires more money ( to buy the american version) but i feel that is an investment in mine and my childrens future.
also there is much being said about tools versus the materials they are used on ie. american made saw for 50 bucks sawing through 2000 bucks of canadian lumber. if you are not going to take a stand on the tools you buy then you probly wont take a stand on the materials you buy. so if you just dont care weather or not your children can find jobs then just keep on buying the "best deal" and let me know where that gets you all
remember all .... the most potent vote is the one you make with your dollars and cents, not at the ballot box.
Hear, hear. All these people making a living using el cheapo junk tools when they can afford American made tools should be ashamed of themselves. If you can't find an American made version, or if the US made tool really does suck, at least buy one made in a democratic country with US friendly relations....

What many do not realize is retailers will price the imported garbage just slightly less than the domestic product. Ill informed consumers choose the lower priced item, the domestic one is dropped, price goes up on the imported crap. Markup on imported junk is obscene.

There is more to life and living than the lowest price.
 
  #18  
Old 03-12-05, 07:19 AM
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Exclamation Enough is enough!

Moderator comment:

The original question in this thread is reasonable as there is nothing wrong with using country of origin as one of the deciding factors when making a purchase.

What will not be tolerated is slamming a product in these forums based on a country's politics.
This is what bars and garages are for.
This website reaches far beyond the US of A and comments like what are being tossed around here border on being racist.
The the true nature of this discussion is really about protectionism and whether or not ordinary folks would be able to afford to buy certain products under this political philosophy.
Global trade is what free enterprise is all about.

This is not a whining site.
Any more, and without warning this thread is history.
 
  #19  
Old 03-23-05, 06:14 PM
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As was posted only Craftsman handtools are guaranteed for life.This includes wrenches,hammers,sockets,etc.Cutting tools {snips,linesmans,etc} do not have this warranty.Powertools have a 2 yr warranty on parts I think.
 
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