circular saws

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  #1  
Old 03-28-05, 11:09 AM
latuszek
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circular saws

I am looking to buy a new circular saw. right now i have an extremely cheap on by Skil right now and I can never get through a piece of 3/4 inch MDF. I have to fight with it every time i use it. Now my question is, is the power of the motor going to be the reason that i can pick up one that looks decent at sears for $60 or spend $150 on a dewalt heavy duty one.

I am sick of fighting with a underpowered circular saw so I am considering "Milwaukee 6391-21 7-1/4" Left Blade Circular Saw with Case" or "DEWALT DW364K 7-1/4" Heavy Duty Circular Saw with Electric Brake and Rear Pivot Depth of Cut Adjustment with Kit Box"

I like the fact that the Milwaukee has a left blade, but for some reason I like the DeWalt brand better. Anyone have any opinions between these two saws? Or possibly another circular saw for around the same price ($150).

TIA
 
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  #2  
Old 03-28-05, 01:47 PM
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I haven't the two you like so I don't have an opinion between them.

I own the Porter Cable and it has a directional exhaust chute accessory. It lets me feed the chips out the top to the left or the right. I really like that.
 
  #3  
Old 03-28-05, 06:30 PM
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I have the Porter Cable also
It is excellent
I tried the LH model in the store when I was shopping and even that one felt great
Light but powerful
It's a joy to use
 
  #4  
Old 03-29-05, 10:10 AM
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Im using a Skilsaw and works pretty well for what I need it for..and never a problem cutting anything, really.
Are you using a sharp blade? If the blade has been pretty well used, that could be why you're having problems cutting mdf. Just my $.02 worth.
 
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Old 03-29-05, 11:13 AM
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jatco has a point. Any skill saw will cut 3/4" mdf effortlessly. You either have a dull blade or it's on backward.

Many low priced saws come with what I call stamped steel blades that are worthless for cutting cardboard, lol. Always use a good carbon tipped blade.
 
  #6  
Old 03-30-05, 05:48 AM
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A good carbide narrow-kerf blade is the starting place. It might cost $8-10, but will last a while depending on the number of nails cut. While you're at it, check the brushes on the saw and use a 12-guage cord 50 ft. or less. Plug into the outlet used by the washing machine (usually a dedicated circuit) rather than the one with the TV and all the lights in the room on it.

If you just must have a better saw, expect to pay $90-110 for a 15-amp sidewinder. I have the PC LH model as well as a Makita with the blade brake.
 
  #7  
Old 03-30-05, 08:32 AM
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Saws

I have used a wide variety of circular saws. I currently have a Porter Cable which cuts very well but I must say that my favorite to use is a Makita. The Porter Cable seems slightly better built but the Makita is easier to use. You can see the line a lot better and it's more comfortable to use. Both have plenty of power and a good quality, carbide blade is a must.

Yours should cut through almost anything you need as long as you have a good blade. I also have an 18 volt Ryobi cordless that will cut through MDF, plywood, 2x12, etc. Not for very long though because of the battery. I would invest in the blade 1st to see what happens. You'll probably need it whether you buy the new saw or not.

Hope this helps.
 
  #8  
Old 03-30-05, 09:35 AM
countrymac
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Latuszek,
It's got to be the blade my friend. You should be able to slide right through MDF with that saw. You can't go wrong with either of the saws you listed but they will be useless in MDF too with a frisbee blade.
Are you burning the wood? Big sign. Good luck. Let us know what you do.

Countrymac
 
  #9  
Old 03-30-05, 11:24 AM
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I have a couple of Craftsman, a Makita and a "blade on the left" Porter Cable. I like the "feel" of the Makita most but like to use the P-C against a straightedge for ripping sheet goods because of thickness of the base. It is less likely to slip under the straightedge.
 
  #10  
Old 03-30-05, 11:45 AM
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Keeping the thread alive, lol.

Speaking of straight edges, I bought the
Tru-Grip FT2TS Pro FT'R Series 2' Clamping 'Rip' Guide w/'T' Slots
from Amazon.com, except I got the 4 footer.

That is nice little straight edge for ripping sheet goods with a circular saw if you don't have a tablesaw handy.
 
  #11  
Old 04-02-05, 08:52 AM
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Nice straight edge, Lugnut. Sure beats my old one with C clamps.
 
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