Power tool storage in cold garage


  #1  
Old 07-25-05, 11:10 AM
michigander
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Power tool storage in cold garage

What is the best method for storing tools in a Detached garage. The garage will be heated while I am working in it (weekends) but will be unheated the rest of the time.

Is it best to store tools (drills, wrenches, sanders, skill saws ......) in plastic storage bins on open shelves or build a larger wood storage cabinet. I am worried about the tool rusting and condensation on the power tools being stored in the garage in the winter and wet weather?
 
  #2  
Old 07-26-05, 05:47 AM
S
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Living here on the corner of river and ocean like I do (the land of rust and mildew), I'd go for the plastic bins
With humidity levels around here I have to watch out for quick temp changes
Which is...all the time (If yah don't like the weathah in New England...stick around ah minute)
I regularly clean and spray Boe-Shield (kind of a beefed up WD-40 that leaves a thin waxy protectant) on appropriate tools and parts of tools
I have found tools stored in wood cabinets have a little better resistance to rust and corrosion compared to those stored on a shelf
Those in their own plastic case seem to do very well...for sure the best option by far
Plastic bins should be just as good
I use large plastic storage bins (they don't seal very well) for loose tools and that helps tremendously with the little stuff
Something that sealed better would work better I'm sure
 
  #3  
Old 07-27-05, 02:15 AM
K
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It isn't very difficult or expensive to dessicate a building (and everything in it) if you work with - not against - moisture migration. Moisture migrates toward relative cool, through permeable material and drafts. Provided your structure is a bit leaky, or breathey, you can be sure just one degree warmer inside than out will lose water.

Then if you have a lot of raw wood in there the wood (structure, projects, sawdust) will stabilise very dry, and serve to buffer fluctuations in humidity.

In my climate this effect comes naturally to any semi-insulated windowed structure that burns lightbulbs or a puny heater in winter. For humid summers though I guess you'd have to insert heat overnights (to displace moisture) then let standing wood wick up incoming moisture during daytime use at comfortable temperature.

***

I have read that mothballs release an oil which settles on tools and deters rust. That would be pretty cool since the gas obviously penetrates motor housings and so forth. The advice is to toss one into every tool drawer.

***

About sealing tools better. This can backfire. If you trap warm air that is also humid around a tool, then let this air cool, moisture will condense. Breathe into a plastic bag, put it in the refrigerator, watch.
 
  #4  
Old 07-27-05, 08:11 PM
S
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Originally Posted by Kobuchi
About sealing tools better. This can backfire.
This is a valid concern
At first I was concerned about this effect you mean with the molded plastic and steel cases that come with many tools
It ended up that those tools lasted much longer before oxidizing than un-cased tools
I would say these cases seal reasonably well, but not air tight
So far these cases seem to work the best
 
  #5  
Old 12-30-05, 01:52 PM
stimpsy
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Modular Garage Storage Cabinets

Hello,

Speaking of garages, I am thinking about building a modular garage storage system (ie. modular cabinets, workbenches, pvc floor tiles etc..)

I found the site www.angel-wings.ca

They carry the Dura and Bergo brand.

Now, to my opinion, the products look very interesting, but my experience is very limited.

Do you know this company? Anyone tried their Dura modular cabinets?

Modular Garage Cabinets
 
  #6  
Old 01-18-07, 11:10 AM
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I was wondering if anybody had any more suggestions to prevent condensation on tools (wrenches, circ saw blades, etc) in an insulated 'heat only when needed' garage?

I've heard condensation problems can be quite bad in this situation.

Would installing an exhaust fan and running it at a certain time solve the problem?

When does the condensation occur? When the hot air touches the cold tools? Or when the hot air starts cooling?

Thanks

Tim
 
  #7  
Old 01-19-07, 01:16 PM
K
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Originally Posted by timg View Post
Would installing an exhaust fan and running it at a certain time solve the problem?
To push air out, the fan must also draw air in. So, addressing air moisture, a fan is just a clever way to put a hole in the wall. If bringing in outside air would help, then yes a fan, vent, or open window could help.
Originally Posted by timg View Post
When does the condensation occur? When the hot air touches the cold tools? Or when the hot air starts cooling?
Both.

Air at a given temperature can hold a certain amount of water. It holds less water at cooler temperatures. So, where we have warm air with lots of moisture in it, becoming cooler, the air sheds some of this excess moisture. In the case of pre-dawn breezes over cold grass, the process is unusual. In a building, it's easier to understand.

Note that the moisture in air diffuses very readily, more so than heat for example. Moisture tends to migrate towards cold. So, a semi-tight structure insulted with fibreglass batts - but NOT sealed with plastic - will tend to dessicate where we have dry summers and a moist heating season. As long as the interior is a bit warmer than outside, condensation won't occur.

This is all totally dependent on climate. The air infiltrating a building may be hot, cold, dry, humid, in any combination changing daily and seasonally. What 's best in one climate may be destructive in another.

I live in the Pacific Northwest - a temperate rainforest - so, ironically, indoor moisture isn't an issue unless we follow building code appropriate to Ottawa or Washington DC.

Where summers are humid, and building interiors are cooler than outdoors, you'll need a moisture barrier - i.e. plastic sheeting and tape. Plus a dehumidifier in most cases.
 
 

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