Purchasing Sawzall or Other Recip Saw, Advice Wanted...


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Old 07-27-05, 08:46 AM
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Question Purchasing Sawzall or Other Recip Saw, Advice Wanted...

We are going to be doing extensive remodeling of our little beach cottage, which is home. I know that one tool we will need to purchase will be a reciprocating saw. I am not very familiar with this type of saw, as I have always used non-power tools in the past, except for drills/drivers.

Can someone/everyone, please give me some idea of what to look for in a good saw? I know that DeWalt and Milwaulkee put out good quality tools, but are there other brands that do as well or similar? We don't necessarily need a cordless one, and am actually thinking that a corded one has more advantages...

Any thoughts/suggestions/information would be really appreciated, as I am hoping to get one within the next 30 days or so.

Thanks,
RhainyC
 
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Old 07-27-05, 09:21 AM
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Check the amperage on a few different brands. I think Milwaukee makes the best. When I bought mine, I knew I would not be using it a whole lot, even though I am remodeling. I got a Craftsman. Only thing I do not like about it is the "tool free" blade changing. It is difficult to use. Sometimes it won't release the blade without a lot of jiggling and such. Guess the main reason I chose this one is that 1 more amp on another brand was $30 more. Good luck on your projects and your search.
 
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Old 07-27-05, 09:24 AM
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Not having much experience with one but needing one I bought a factory reconditioned porter cable with quick release chuck based on price. I am very happy with it and having learned more about other saws alls I have found the quick change feature to be a big plus.
 
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Old 07-27-05, 12:17 PM
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I have both the PC Tigersaw (purchased new) with the QC blade holder and a refurbed Supersawzall (also with QC blade holder).

The Supersawzall counterbalance is a very desirable feature. I loan out the PC to my sons and neighbors, using the Milwaukee tool myself.

Sometimes I do have to use a visegrip tool to get the QC to release, but it sure beats searching for a hex key.
 
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Old 07-27-05, 08:40 PM
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Why does everyone have trouble with the quick change? The one on my tigersaw works great! The only trouble I ever have with it is if I go brain dead and try to turn it the wrong direction.
 
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Old 07-27-05, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by RhainyC
We are going to be doing extensive remodeling of our little beach cottage, which is home. I know that one tool we will need to purchase will be a reciprocating saw.
Pick them up, hold them, see how it feels weight and balance
Hold it upside down like you were cutting "up"
If it feels good that's probably the one for you
If you look at the specs a higher amp and longer stroke are usually better
For your needs I'd definately recommend corded
The cordless' have their occasional advantage over corded, but you won't be running into this type of situation much in your usage
In fact, with your usage, you would be running into the cordless' weakness' more often
Now say cordless's weakness's three times real fast
 
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Old 07-28-05, 09:07 AM
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Although I really wanted a higher end saw, my father had a Black & Decker that he bought for a deck project that he was willing to give me (the saw, not the deck project...). The only other reciprocating saw I've used was a Ryobi cordless, so I can't give you a comparison with other brands. However, this one worked fine for the demolition work I was doing, and I'm glad (for once) that I didn't buy a new one.

Also, I'd agree with the corded / cordless assessment. Cordless is nice for limited projects, working up on a ladder, etc., but there's not enough power or time for really serious work. That said, sooner or later I will probably buy a Ryobi cordless kit (small circular saw, reciprocating saw, drill and flashlight) to have the drill as a secondary unit and to get the convenience of cordless tools when I have small things to do.

Good luck with your renovations.

Jay
 
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Old 07-28-05, 09:29 AM
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Talking WoW! Thanks Everyone!

I really appreciated all the responses!

I have an idea now how to go about choosing one! Shopping time is the first week in Aug, all going well.

I will let you all know what I end up with!

Many Thanks,
RhainyC
 
 

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