Corded VSR Drill ,Dewalt vs Ridgid


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Old 08-02-05, 02:37 PM
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Corded VSR Drill ,Dewalt vs Ridgid

Not a major purchase both cost $59, but just wanted to see if anyone owns any of the two mentioned drills, I am thinking of buying, and to see which one they recommend.
I narrowed it down to the DEWALT D21008K Heavy Duty 3/8" VSR Drill and RIDGID 3/8 In. VSR Drill Model R7000.
My only concern about the dewalt is that it is now made in Mexico,wondering if it effects the quility, probably not much of a difference , since i'm guessing the Ridgid is made in China, like alot of their other stuff.

I'll be using the drill for a little SLC mixing and general drilling, nothing too major.
 
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Old 08-03-05, 07:46 AM
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I have a Dewalt cordless drill and have been very happy with it. I have seen many posts in this forum talk about the great warranty Rigid puts on their tools, so I would also use that as a comparison test. Pick up both drills and see how they feel in your hand. These are both good tools, so I would buy the one that fits your hand better, if there is a difference.
 
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Old 08-10-05, 07:56 PM
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Hey J.M.C. , I went to the bigbox today ,did a 180 and ended up leaving with the starter kit from Ryobi, it includes a 18 volt drill, trimsaw and flashlight for 99 bucks. I really liked the feel of the Ridgid drill ,but the the chucksize 3/8" was too small for the job that I am doing and the other options on 1/2 inch chuck drills were a little over the top for my needs,the price too, so I choose a happy medium, and went with the 18 volt Ryobi for mortar mixing , drilling and putting screws down.
The Ryobi will be a welcomed addition to my aging fleet of drills. I have an old school ,made in the USA ,electric Black and Decker drill from the 1960's (that I got from me gramps), a 14volt Skil from early 2000's and a 7.2 volt versapak/ B & D circa late 90's, and tool box filled with old 3.6 volt and lower screwdrivers.
I tore up the floor yestarday and today, and will be putting down hardibacker tommorrow and tiling this weekend. I 'll post a review on this drill after a months worth of use, and see how I feel about it then .We will see if it gets a big 's up or not. : )
 
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Old 08-11-05, 05:38 PM
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you will love ryobi

I would by an extra drill for mortar mixing though (they are cheap so not a big problem) I burned mine up mixing thinset for a bathroom tile job. Once they break, it is cheaper to buy another then to get it fixed. Good tools though and cant beat the price.
 
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Old 08-11-05, 06:10 PM
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well the ryobi does come with a two year warranty
 
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Old 08-11-05, 09:10 PM
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Talking

Mex , I noticed the 3 speed hammer drill from Ryobi, looks pretty solid, I was going to pick it up, but then noticed I needed the to buy the batts and charger seperate, so I passed and went with the starter kit hoping the normal 18volt drill would be up to the task, I kinda like the fisher price trim saw too, it will look cute next to my Ryobi skilsaw.
Mango I just filled out my Ryobi tool registration form online
Well guys, I got behind today, and just did a basic layout of the backerboard. I made another trip to HD and got some more screws, so I dont have to take off in the middle of the job to get supplies. I was kinda displeased with the HD staff in the tile dept, I was looking for metal or pastic lathe to set the SLC, I talked to 3 of the staff, explained what it does, showed the instructions on the back of the SLC bag, but they had no answers, so decided I didnt want to wast my time anymore, thanked them for their help and continued shopping for other things.I just try a local True Value in the morning. A HD rant could be a seperate thread, ;0.
On a positive note, I used the trim saw out in the parking lot for the 1st time, I drive a saturn, so my cargo space is limited , but the trim saw made more space, when I chopped a little off the 2x4. Overall , It worked pretty well, went right through it with no problem. I dont have any plans on building a deck with it anytime soon, but I was surprised. Its kinda cool to have a little portable saw to cut things with when I need to shove things in the trunk.
I am going to go a little more gentle on the drill then tomorrow, I dont want to beat it like a rented mule, have it burn out on me only to have to travel to get another one in the middle of a project. I figure I can mix the mortar in small batches and use a small trowel by hand to help things along.
Wish me luck : )
 
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Old 08-29-05, 05:09 PM
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+1 for dewalt. My 18v xrp has help up well for 2 years now, and I use that mostly for drilling thin steel.

Jim
 
 

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