moving a big generator

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  #1  
Old 09-12-05, 11:31 AM
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moving a big generator

I purchased a 64"x28" 900 lb generator. Now I find out that they deliver
it, but don't take it off the truck. I don't even know how to find someone that will do this job.

I also need it installed on top of the cement slab.

The cement slab is about 20 feet from the driveway

I wonder what they would do when they drive up with the generator and I have no way to get the machine off the truck. Guess it goes back to where I bought it.

Any ideas will be greatly appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 09-12-05, 03:48 PM
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Hmmm... short on planning?

Well, if you send it back, you will pay for return freight and possibly a restocking fee.

If you pick it up at the freight terminal, you will save on the residential delivery fee, and the freight company will load it onto your truck when you pick it up from their dock (hint, hint).

The easiest way to get it to the pad is to rent a truck with a liftgate. The size and weight listed will work/fit just fine. Yup, gotta drive on the grass. The weight isn't so bad, a couple of strong people with a johnny bar and some brains in applying leverage will do just fine. Use the mind, not the back.

If you can't drive on the grass, getting the genset off the liftgate and onto some strong furniture dollies, and using 2 sheets of 3/4 plywood as a path will also do the trick quite well. Moving the plywood is cheaper than buying more. If you are careful, take it back to the store when you are done.

Other options range from hiring millwrights or machinery movers to do it for you, to picking it up in an open truck and hiring a small crane to lift it.
 
  #3  
Old 09-12-05, 05:49 PM
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Thumbs up Send it back - Not an option

Thank you for the many choices. Tomorrow I will try to get someone to
do this job. I'll be back to let you know what happens next.

This purchase has just been one surprise after another. I understood the cost of the generator, it is the other important things I was not fully aware of that really increased the cost.

I can suggest that after you price the generator, just double the cost for the concrete pad, sales tax, the possibility of an in ground tank for LP, the shipping & not taking it off the truck and don't forget the electrician or the right transfer switch for the generator.

I hope this is worth it
 
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Old 09-12-05, 06:11 PM
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The rolling approach is the simplest, though 900 pounds is not something that you want to let loose on its own. Something will get smashed that way.
Surely there is a lifting eye on this unit on the upper surface, unless there are some lifting holes in the base. Several approaches come to mind once it's on the ground. Forklift or crane would come to mind. If those are not around, either metal pipe rolling on plywood could reduce the rolling resistance. If all else fails, some lumber placed beneath the unit and some logging chain connected to a pickup truck trailer hitch should drag it nicely. The ruts in the yard can be filled in later. The piano dollys will work, though the wheels may not stay lined up with the direction that you want to go.
 
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Old 09-12-05, 08:23 PM
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TTASHA,

My suggestion to you is to first get on the phone as soon as the sun rises to postpone the delivery.

If you are not experienced at moving something like this and don't have dollies, pipes for rolling or other equipment for this work you would do well to hire someone.

One source that I use for a quick lift is a local lumberyard.
If you have one nearby they likely wouldn't charge that much and most forklift operators are quite knowlegeable at moving heavy objects.

Would there be access for a forklift to set it on the pad?
 
  #6  
Old 09-13-05, 03:20 AM
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Originally Posted by TTASHA
This purchase has just been one surprise after another. I understood the cost of the generator, it is the other important things I was not fully aware of that really increased the cost.

I can suggest that after you price the generator, just double the cost for the concrete pad, sales tax, the possibility of an in ground tank for LP, the shipping & not taking it off the truck and don't forget the electrician or the right transfer switch for the generator.

I hope this is worth it
I hope you understand the limitations of the generator, like it probably won't run the whole house, or the central air conditioner unit. Transfer panels usually have a limited number of circuits compared to the main panel.

The larger the generator, the more fuel it will use.

Lots of luck.
 
  #7  
Old 09-13-05, 05:35 AM
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Is this overkill?

We do not lose power very often and for short periods of a few hours when we do. Is this system part of a life-support arrangement for someone who is incapacitated? For over 15 years, a small portable gasoline generator on wheels that only weighs 100 pounds and will run the refrigerator, television and a few lights/fans has been sufficient. I use a few extension cords to connect to the appliances to receive power.
Is the power in your area very unreliable? If it is, then either a natural gas or LP fuel supply in a large tank would be advisable. If the fuel will be LP, I would avoid burying it in the ground. Corrosion can occur, resulting in loss of fuel. Once that occurs it must be abandoned or removed. A friend of mine in Texas developed a leak in his buried LP tank for his pool heater.
 
  #8  
Old 09-13-05, 07:44 AM
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The final hurdle

IBM, the GAS company buried the tank in the ground. This was not a home project. I will call gas company & see what they say about leakage.
No incapacity here. However, I do run a small company from my home.

DANSKI, Yes I do understand limitations of the generator as the electrician & I have decided what will be running. The unit uses 2.1 gallons an hour. The LP tank is 250 gallons so it should run a few days at a time.

GregH - the delivery company will call when it arrives in this area which might be in 5 or 6 days. I will then be able to schedule delivery. I will call every lumber company, millwright & machinery mover I can find today.

Yes there is access to the generator pad from the driveway; however, the pad is 10-15 feet from the driveway.

All I want is a competent company to make this happen. This is the WORST part of this whole deal.
 
  #9  
Old 09-13-05, 08:19 AM
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This sounds like a good layout once it's all in place.

If you are renting/leasing the tank (not owning it), then it will be the gas supplier's problem to replace it. Of course, you will lose up to 250 gallons of fuel and need to have a temporary tank put in place until the defective one can be excavated and replaced.
You will need to check the fuel level probably once per week or once per month, even if the generator runs only during its programmed periodic startup. It could run when you are not home and thus you would be unaware of the amount of fuel consumed.

You are actually doing a commercial-type project in a residential setting. That's why it's so much work. It's on a small scale, but the issues that you are dealing with are commonplace to commercial environments. I would bet no one else in the neighborhood of homes has something like this in place.
 
  #10  
Old 09-13-05, 08:45 AM
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neighbors do have big generators

ibm

Yes, several of my neighbors do have these generators.

I should just run over to one & see how they had theirs delivered
and installed.

Excellent idea
 
  #11  
Old 09-14-05, 08:39 AM
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Short on Planning - Long on LUCK

Finally have the perfect solution. A local company has a lift truck they
will operate (thank God). They will remove the generator from the truck
and install it on the concrete pad. They are very close to my home so I can call them when the truck is a half hour away & they will be here waiting for
the delivery.

PHEW
 
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