Drill bits


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Old 11-02-05, 10:42 AM
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Drill bits

New to tools!

I have a Makita drill...

I need a masonry drill bit...

Can I just buy any masonry drill bit and use it w/my Makita drill?
 
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Old 11-02-05, 11:09 AM
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Short answer, yes. However, depending on what you're drilling into, you might need a hammerdrill.
 
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Old 11-02-05, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by J.M.C.
Short answer, yes. However, depending on what you're drilling into, you might need a hammerdrill.
while hammerdrills are nice , you can certainly drill masonry with a stanard drill motor like your makita, just be sure to use a masonry bit
 
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Old 11-02-05, 11:32 AM
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Need to drill concrete (floor)...still ok?
 
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Old 11-02-05, 11:39 AM
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Go for it.
 
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Old 11-02-05, 12:36 PM
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What kind of makita... if its liek a 7.2v drill/driver then dont even bother. If your talking corded or 14v+ then your ok. Just try to get a USA made bit out of principal.

Jim
 
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Old 11-02-05, 07:03 PM
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DIYADDICT,

The diameter of the hole and the hardness of the concrete will determine your success with a non-hammer drill.
Diameters up to about 1/4" should be no problem.
The speed of the drill rather than it's power is the most important.
Use the fastest setting.

A little tip is that if you are drilling concrete with a regular drill, a pointed chisel will help.
If the hole advances a bit and then the drill won't go any further, place the punch into the hole and hit it with a hammer. Doesn't have to be very hard.
It is usually a small stone that causes the stoppage and will be broken by the chisel.

Be sure to wear safety glasses.
How big a hole do you need?
 
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Old 11-02-05, 07:12 PM
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I regularly drill concrete up to 5/8" with standard (non hammer) drill 9.6,14.4 cordless now 18 volt cordless.

using presure on the drill helps . unlike wood where you let the bit do the work I suggest putting some muscle behind it when drilling masonry

( I did break down and buy a hammer drill the other day to replace my 18volt cordless when the switch broke while I was putting up shutters with hurricane Wilma on the way . I haven't had a chance to use it on masonry yet )
 
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Old 11-03-05, 10:59 AM
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I have a 12 volt cordless 3/8" MFORCE...

I am installing laminate floating wood and the hole in the concrete is for the transition pieces. The screws aren't that big/thick but I never knew you could just drill into concrete w/out the concrete cracking.

Will use the fastest setting! I actually thot the slower setting would be best so the concrete wouldn't crack so that helps a lot.

Don't want to break my new drill so I'll try what's been suggested first and if it doesn't do anything I may just glue the piece though I heard it just might come out...

Thanks everyone
 
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Old 11-03-05, 03:01 PM
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If it's just for trim then a 3/16" hole for a plastic anchor should be no sweat.
Just use some judgement when pushing on the drill so as not to overload it.
 
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Old 11-03-05, 09:37 PM
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Buy a decent quality drill bit - I bent a cheap masonry bit last year.
 
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Old 11-04-05, 08:44 AM
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How can I tell what is decent and not decent?
 
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Old 11-04-05, 09:40 AM
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most everybody sells vermont american around here thats what I generallly use , I wouldnt worry to much just dont buy a 30 peice set for 2.99
 
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Old 11-08-05, 09:53 AM
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Hey guys! Thanks! I went to HD and they had the vermont american and I was able to drill my hole though it took a lot of work so now I understand why a corded drill would be best...I need to recharge my battery! I have a lot of holes to make...

Speed is very important-I set it at the fast...worked great
Placing a punch into the hole w/hammer when it wouldn't go further is a very smart thing to do...really helped a lot.

I love tools...!!!
 
 

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