Drywall Texture Spraying with an Air Compressor


  #1  
Old 11-02-05, 05:47 PM
BillsBayou
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Drywall Texture Spraying with an Air Compressor

I'm redoing all the drywall from 4' down in my house (Katrina flood) and will be doing the orange peel texture myself. But I don't want to screw it up.

I bought a "Spraying Mantis" texture hopper/texture gun and an 8-gallon Central Pneumatic compressor. This is not an oilless compressor.

I know nothing about air tools.

Do oiled compressors blow any oil in the air?
Should I even worry about this?

I'm going to spray watered down drywall mud for the texturizing, so I'm not concerned about moisture in the line, just oil. I'd hate to have oil "blooms" on my wall 3 months after we move back into the house. Do it right the first time, right?
 
  #2  
Old 11-02-05, 06:18 PM
BillsBayou
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P.s.

I should add that I know of the existence of "Lubricator" cylinders that I could add in-line for oiling air tools. I of course would not install one between the compressor and the spray tool. My question relates to the oil-content of the air being produced by the compressor.
 
  #3  
Old 11-03-05, 06:09 AM
M
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I have never noticed any oil from unlubricated lines. From time to time I have sprayed a lot of texture with my sears 1hp 11gal comp [belt drive] and never had any problems.
 
  #4  
Old 11-03-05, 09:50 AM
S
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It doesn't sound like this will be a problem, but using a sealing primer after spraying the mud would be an extra preventive measure - you have to prime anyway, so this would just be a potentially different product choice.
 
  #5  
Old 11-03-05, 12:39 PM
M
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As JMC said using a primer sealer on the walls would be a good idea. Not so much from the oil stand point [I doubt there would be any] but with all the moisture the house was subjected too it would be wise for all the remaining sheetrock to be properly sealed.
 
  #6  
Old 11-13-05, 06:21 AM
M
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Oil or oiless compressors pertain to the compression cylinders, or the way the compressed air is created, not if you will or won't have oil in the output. (the "oil type" compressors usually have a motor that drives a piston in a cast iron cylinder via a belt. The cylinder needs oil so it doesn't cease. "oiless" don't have these cast iron cylinders.)

You will however have moisture that should be removed before the air goes into the gun. This water sometimes contains small traces of oily substance.

Anytime air is compressed, moisture (humidity) that is in the air will condense. The boiling/ freezing point of water changes as the ambient environment changes; hence the moisture does not stay in its "humidity" state when it is in a 125 psi environment; it condenses.

That is why it is important to continuously drain the water from the tank.

I hope this helps.
 
 

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