torque wrench

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  #1  
Old 11-04-05, 10:48 AM
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torque wrench

What do you think is the most common or best torque range in a torque wrench you should buy for general automotive work. I have read in places that you should only buy a torque wrench that is in the specific range that you will be using it in sense it is off in 20 percent of its total capacity. I don't really know what they are trying to state there but this is what I usually read.......... Accurate to + or - 4 percent on clockwise or right-handed reading greater than or equal to 20 percent of capacity.....this was stated on a torque wrench that says it measures 20 to 150 feet. lb...What does this mean and also what torque range is the best for general work in your best opinion. Thanks alot for the help
 
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Old 11-04-05, 09:54 PM
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About 60-120 lbs. should do the job.
 
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Old 11-05-05, 04:59 AM
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My go-to torque wrench I believe is 20-150
 
  #4  
Old 11-05-05, 02:13 PM
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My interpretation.

" I have read in places that you should only buy a torque wrench that is in the specific range that you will be using it in sense it is off in 20 percent of its total capacity."

" total capacity" = 150 ft-lb.
20% of 150 is 30 ft-lb. so at 150 it may be off + or - 30 ft-lb.
At 50% capacity (75 ft-lb) it may be off + or - 15 ft-lb.

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" I don't really know what they are trying to state there but this is what I usually read.......... Accurate to + or - 4 percent on clockwise or right-handed reading greater than or equal to 20 percent of capacity.....this was stated on a torque wrench that says it measures 20 to 150 feet. lb...What does this mean "

"20 percent of capacity ".= 20% of 150 = 30 ft-lb

Accurate to + or - 4 percent on clockwise or right-handed reading greater than or equal to 30 ft-lb.
That's + or - 4 percent accuracy at 30 ft-lb or grater.
Below 30 ft-lb may be off more then 4%.

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I have several torque wrenches.
The first one a 1/2" drive, is 0-150 ft-lb (most common)
The second a 3/8" drive, is 0-75 ft-lb. it was calibrated in inch pounds but when I returned it to sears they gave me one calibrated in ft-lb.
Most of the smaller bolts are listed in inch-lb. now I need to do the math and convert from inches to feet.

Both are the beam type.
The draw back is, you need to see the scale to use it. in a tight spot you may need to use a click type.


I also have some spring loaded click type, but they state you should have the calibration checked every year.
and to remove the load (lower setting back to zero) on the spring if your not using them, this may prolong the accuracy.
This type is nice because you don't have to look at the scale.
Some of the click type are only accurate for right hand bolts, if you have a left hand crankshaft bolt you may not be able to use it.

I use the beam type most of the time. do to the statement the click type should be calibrated every year.

BTW, don't use a torque wrench in place of a breaker bar.
 
  #5  
Old 11-06-05, 09:36 AM
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I would add that most beam type torque wrenches are garunteed for life and most 'clickers' have a 1-2 yr warrantty.
 
  #6  
Old 11-11-05, 07:56 PM
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Ok theres soem mis information here...

Let me explain the hwol 4%/20% thing... they mean th torque wrench is accurate to +/- 4 %, which means if your tightening something to 100ftlbs, it will be between 96 and 104 ft lbs. Most click type torque wrenches are accurate to 4%. The 20% means it is accurate to that 4% within the top 80% of the scale, so the lower numbers wont be as accurate. This is common with all torquewrenches... thy are most accurate in the middle of their range.

For automotive work if you mean lug nuts, get something that hasa 80-120 ft lbs in the middle of the scale, as that is what most wheel studs can handle.

Personally, I wouldnt recomend sears, I mean they are fine for basic stuff, but I wouldnt build one of my engines with one. I use and SK, and its been very dependable... www.skhandtool.com

Snap ons are also great, but very expensive. They are made by CDI, and All CDI makes are torque wrenches. Precision Instruments is another excellent brand.

I recomend a click type (micrometer style) torque wrench. The beam types, while cheaper, are a PITA to use.

Jim
 
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