Air Compressor

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  #1  
Old 12-01-05, 09:42 AM
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Air Compressor

I have a Campbell Hausfeld 3 gallon tank which is rated at 100 psi. I was wondering if it would be risky to run it up to 110 psi.

Any help would be appreciated.

Best,
bub...
 
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  #2  
Old 12-01-05, 10:34 AM
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It depends on the rating of the tank. What pressure rating is the pop off valve.

My first air comp is a sears 1hp 11 gal. It was factory set at 90-95 psi. I jacked the regulator up to 110 with no problems. Mine had a 120 psi pop off valve.

Adding more pressure doesn't necesarily give you more air. A 3 gal tank has little reserve and I doubt the cfm rating will change any.

What are your intended uses for your compressor?
 
  #3  
Old 12-01-05, 11:11 AM
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Thanks for the response. It has a relief valve that I can pull manually and I assume it will pop itself as well. It has 115psi and 39scfm marked on it.

In itself I use it for blowing mostly and a bit of nailing. I also use that one to fill an 11 gallon 125 psi tank so, I thought if I bring the pressure up a little then up goes the pressure in the 11 gallon.

I can't see where I can adjust anything. I would simply cross the two terminals on the pressure switch when I want it a little higher.

To fill the 11 gallon, I simply put a hose between the two.

Thanks for any advice you can give. I will likely get a better compressor for the 11 gallon but for now, an extra 10PSI in the 11 might give me a little more for air tools.

bub...
 
  #4  
Old 12-01-05, 04:11 PM
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The relief valve is the pop off valve.
I am unaware of how the regulator works on your compressor. On both of mine the regulator is set up similiar to a well pump regulator. 2 contacts with a screw through a spring. Adjusting one affects the cut in pressure , the other the cut off pressure.

Don't over adjust your cut off pressure. The relief valve will pop if the tank pressure reaches 115 psi.

10 lbs won't make a big difference in the operation of air tools. It will allow a nail gun to shoot a nail deeper or into harder wood. On most other air tools the extra pressure will be gone seconds after pulling the trigger.
 
  #5  
Old 12-02-05, 03:53 AM
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Thanks again.

I use the 11 gallon to run a 3/8 butterfly and a 1/2 impact with the little compressor and 3 gallon behind as the filling mechanism.

Coming out of the 3 gallon tank is what I think is a pressure switch with the two wires. The unit appears sealed unless I have to take it out of the tank to see the two screwas that you mentioned.

What I did is added a switch to crosses over the two contacts on the prssure switch so at will, I can bypass that pressure switch to take it up a bit. This give me the ability to fill when it goes to 90PSI in the tank instead of having to wait until it gets down to 75 althoug it is manual.

Thanks again.
bub..
 
  #6  
Old 12-02-05, 05:31 AM
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Sounds like you have an entirely different type of regulator. Make sure you always keep an eye on the pressure gauge when you short out the regulator.
 
  #7  
Old 12-02-05, 11:55 AM
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Will do. It is a separate switch that actually, now that it's in, almost looks factory. My only concern is, as to whether or not I am risking that integrity of the tank itself by going to 110 on a 100 rating. I know ratings are there for a reason but usually there is a little bit of a buffer in the testing process.

I don't mind the relief popping but, I sure don't want the tank coming apart.

Thanks again for all of your good advice.

bub...
 
  #8  
Old 12-02-05, 03:24 PM
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There are a few reasons why shorting the pressure switch out is not such a great idea.
First and formost is the fact that with you working near live terminals you put yourself in danger of electrocution.
I know that people often think they are being carefull but there are can be something unexpected happen that makes you loose your footing or grip on a tool or whatever.
This risk alone is reason enough to quit now while you are still alive.
Another problem is that by hearing air come out of your pressure relief valve, you are not testing its ability to protect you if the pressure were to somehow get too high.
The pressure you use with your finger to blow off some air does not relate to its ability to relieve pressure. It is there to make sure the passages are clear.
A relief valve is considered a safety device and for you to expect it to pop off, you are trying to use a safety as an operating device.
In fact, in some instances where pressure relief devices are used at a slightly higher pressure, the operation of the manual trip lever is only allowed for occasional testing. By using it too many times it will loose its certification.


Other than a safety issue, the gain you expect to make by upping the pressure is lost by the fact that as the pressure increases, the cfm rating of the compressor goes down.
In other words you are really getting no benefit for taking the risk.

I'd say just shop for a bigger compressor.
 
  #9  
Old 12-02-05, 08:16 PM
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Thanks for the response.

No issues with electrocution, I wired a switch into it that crosses the pressure switch. At this point, I only use it to fill the tank when it's at say 90psi and bring it back up to it's rated 100psi instead of having to wait until it drop to 75psi and cuts in. The switch is a good installation, mounted into the plastic shroud beside the main switch with all connections soldered and heat shrinked.

What I wanted to do now is to see if I can run that 3 gallon 100psi rated tank up to 110psi manually and if I would be risking the structure of the tank in doing so.

If I could do that, I would be able to get an extra 10psi in the 11 gallon tank which I thought would make a difference with air tools. The 11 gallon tank is rated for 125psi.

It is twi separate units. a 3 gallon with a 1/3 HP compressor on it and an 11 gallon tank, no complressor so I use the little one to fill the big one.

I will shop for a bigger compressor for the bigger tank but, it is hard to find one that I am happy with that does not already have it's own tank.

Thanks once again for your honest and valauble advice.

bub...
 
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