Nail Gun Recommendations

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-08-05, 06:58 AM
highlander
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Nail Gun Recommendations

I'm shopping for my first nail gun. I'm about to tackle a basement remodel and need to nail into cinder block walls.

I've never owned a nail gun, and have only used one maybe a half dozen times, so please keep the dialogue basic for me!

I would like to purchase one that's got enough juice to nail a 2x4 into cinder block, but that I can also use for other projects in my shop (various furnature building, etc). So it would need to be able to drive nails of varying size.

Can electric guns nail into cinder block, or do I definitely need to buy a compressor? Can anyone recommend a make/model (one that I can purchase at my local Home Depot and won't break my bank)?

Huge Thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-08-05, 08:27 AM
IBM5081's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 655
1. Nail guns - pneumatic, not electric.
2. One size does not fit all applications - just like one size nail is not used for all fastening situations.
3. Nails are not the universal fastener - anchor bolts, toggle bolts, screws, construction adhesive, powder guns and other fasteners are sometimes better suited to the application.
4. Nailers - the operative word is name-brand, the reason is parts and repair availability, unless you don't mind throwing away the nailer when it cannot be repaired. Search with Google for "framing nailer review" to see what's recommended and preferred.
 
  #3  
Old 12-08-05, 08:52 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,211
Depending on what you are nailing to the cement, and how many fasteners you will need to use, you're cheapest tool would be a Remington powder actuated fastener... the type you hit with a hammer. They are about $25. You would need to buy powder cartridges (like .22 bullets) and the correct length nails for the job.

Rather than nailing, using cement screws might also be an option- Predrilling the holes with a hammer drill and then using a Tapcon cement screw.

It would help to know exactly what material you are planning on installing against the cement and why. In basement remodels, walls are often built inside the cement walls and are attached at the top and bottom only - not against the wall.
 
  #4  
Old 12-08-05, 08:58 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
I use a powder activated gun for nailing 2x4s to concrete
...never done it with cinder block though, most basements around here are poured
Regardless, what IBM5081 says is true
I can't use my powder activated gun to make furniture, and can't use my pneumatic finish nailer to nail framing to concrete, or do any framing at all really
Really just trim
You couldn't trim with a framing nailer, and so on...
I think you get the idea
 
  #5  
Old 12-08-05, 09:02 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Originally Posted by XSleeper
... In basement remodels, walls are often built inside the cement walls and are attached at the top and bottom only - not against the wall.
Maybe that's why I can't remember ever nailing a 2 x 4 to cinder block
I'd be nailing a toe to the floor, that's it
All the floors are poured around here

The few times I have had to nail wood to a cement wall, it was a 1/3 wall, and poured
 
  #6  
Old 12-08-05, 09:33 AM
IBM5081's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 655
I like the pre-drilled tapcon screws idea. If the lumber can be secured well enough, do it in 2 passes - one to drill and one to drive screws.
I have used the powder-gun driven nails as well. You might consider renting one of the more expensive units for a day. I don't use it that often, so the hammer-driven one works OK. It IS fairly slow if you have very many of them to drive. Old concrete will spall and chip out, but the cinder block might hold fairly well. You will want a helper since it's a challenge to:
1- hold the board in position on the wall
2- hold the powder gun in position on the board
3- hold the hammer to drive the powder gun
all at the same time.
 
  #7  
Old 12-08-05, 09:40 AM
IBM5081's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 655
I would bet that cinder block wall is neither flat nor plumb. Could make the rest of the framing interesting if the studs conform to the wall. Might do well to build a wood wall with a top and bottom plate, then tilt it into place and secure the plates to the cinder block. Use Simpson straps and the powder gun to connect them.
 
  #8  
Old 12-08-05, 10:15 AM
highlander
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
In response to: "It would help to know exactly what material you are planning on installing against the cement and why. In basement remodels, walls are often built inside the cement walls and are attached at the top and bottom only - not against the wall."

The basement isn't "exactly" a basement. It's a full barn with cinder block walls and cement slab floors - 3300 square feet that make up the "first story" of my house. The house is the second level. It's kinda like having a really big basement that's above ground (so dry).

I plan to make a good bit of the space into more living area. To do so, I need to insulate the exterior facing cinder block walls. I had intended to frame out walls agaist the cinder block and nail up (or attach with screws) insulation between the newly created wall studs.

Recommendations?
 
  #9  
Old 12-08-05, 11:34 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,211
Yes. You'd want to frame 2x4 (or 2x6) walls inside of your cinder block walls. Leave space between the wall and the cinder block wall so that the two do not touch. Frame your wall plumb, nailing it (or screwing it) into the cement floor, and attaching the top plate to the ceiling. It does not need to be attached to the cinder block in any way. You'll be able to install fiberglass batts to insulate.
 
  #10  
Old 12-12-05, 06:17 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
nail gun recommendations

As with the other responders, please don't use a nail gun to fasten wood to cinder blocks. Use Tapcon type screws, or powder actuated fasteners to perform this task.
With that said, you still will need a nail gun for your project. Each one has a specific job, and as a contractor, I use a large group of them. I use the Bostitch framing nailer and roofing coil nailer, Senco SFN40 and AirFree 41 finish nailers, and Porter Cable brad nailer and narrow crown stapler. None of them are cheap, but I have had very little down time with any of them in years. I feel if you skimp on quality, you will spend more money and time with repairs than you will in actual use, so be careful. Off brand nailers may not have parts available as readily as name brands. Also, certain guns require lubrication (do it), and others don't, so keep that in mind, and make it a part of your regular maintenance program. Good luck with your project, and be safe, wear eye protection always.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'