Circular Saw question


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Old 12-11-05, 08:30 AM
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Circular Saw Help

I'm looking for a new circular saw and would like to get everyones opinion on which saws work well and hold up the best. Is there a difference between worm drive and direct saws or is it a matter of personal preference.
 

Last edited by MikeL; 12-11-05 at 09:18 AM.
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Old 12-11-05, 02:05 PM
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For general homeowner use, a regular non-worm-drive saw should be adequate. Go to your nearest home center and pick out the one that fits your hand and price range. While you're there, get a premium-quality, thin-kerf blade with 24 or 40 carbide teeth.
All of them will cut lumber and plywood. You're not going to be earning a living with it, so it will probably outlive you. You will spend between $50 and $150 on the saw.
Red saws, gray saws, green saws and turquoise saws work very well. Some people like the blue saws because they are less expensive. Others only like yellow saws which cut well too. Pick the color that you like which fits your hand and budget.
I have a gray saw and a turquoise saw. My blue saw I gave to my son - it was still working well and I did not need 3 circular saws.
 
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Old 12-12-05, 11:28 AM
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As far as brands go, I don't have enough experience to form an educated opinion (although my brother-in-law's DeWalt has it all over my Skil). One suggestion I'll offer is to look at how well the base is made. My Skil ($40) has a base made from press formed sheet steel. None of the surfaces have been machined or prepped to ensure any degree of accuracy. The orientation of the edge guides and blade were off too and had to be pursuaded into alignment. The Dewalt I referred to has a beefy cast aluminum base. As far as durability goes, I'm not sure if it would be prone to cracking, but I'm confident that it provides a truer cut than my Skil.
 
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Old 12-12-05, 11:58 AM
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When the price of the saw is above $90, it is typically a better product that is intended for professional use. Ensuring that a premium blade is mounted and using a saw guide will go far in making straight cuts that are square rather than bevelled.
 
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Old 12-12-05, 03:14 PM
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I generaly expect a lot out of my tools. This one will be used in part to finish my house and who knows what down the road. I don't mind investing in a good tool like most people I mind throwing away money on a bad tool. So from a professionals point of view what's the real difference between the colors. I was giving some thought to a Skill HD77 but then again there are similar ones avaiable in different colors. suggestions?
 
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Old 12-12-05, 03:21 PM
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I have never owned a worm-drive saw. They are significantly heavier than most circ saws, even the magnesium-cased model. For the uses you propose, call or visit a framing contractor or the supply house where these contractors buy their framing nails and other consumables.
 
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Old 12-12-05, 05:20 PM
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circular saw

After a customer ran over one of my saws, he gave me $100 to replace it. I argued that the saw wasn't worth that, but he insisted. So that gave me the means to upgrade. I purchased a left handed Porter Cable for about $120. I will NEVER go back to a regular circular saw. Once you get used to the weight being on the right side of the saw, you will love it. I always thought it pretty stupid to have to look over the blade guard to see the blade. With the left handed saw, the blade is on your side, in clear view, making your marked line visible throughout the cut. Worm gear saws have the blade on the left, but are considerably heavier. Great for contractor use, but definitely not for the homeowner. The Porter Cable is a high amperage saw, and mine has been going constantly for several years without a hitch, except when I cut the cord (duh). I think you will like it.
 
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Old 12-13-05, 07:11 AM
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Thanks for the replies. I just ordered a Porter Cable 743K Left Circular saw. The reviews read highly of it and I have other porter cable products which I'm happy with. Thanke again.
 
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Old 12-14-05, 05:31 AM
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My gray saw is the left-handed model referenced. It cuts wood just fine and the cut line is more visible, but not without a cost. You WILL want eye protection at all times using a blade-left saw in your right hand, since any chips that fly out the side of the blade will seek out your face. Also, the little chimney at the front of the blade will do a fine job of directing sawdust at your helper who is holding the sheet of plywood while you cut it. So, when you make each cut, decide where you want most of the chips to land. If the chimney is covered with the spring-loaded cap, the saw will still cut, but the chips will fall back down to bounce out toward your face. My other circ saw is a right-blade model.
 
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Old 12-14-05, 07:56 AM
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fwiw, Ive had my $39.(CAD) Skil saw for more than 5 years..with pretty regular use and a sharp blade and hasnt failed me yet!
 
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Old 12-14-05, 09:20 AM
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Thanks for the tips on the chips I like the part about directing them at your helper . I always wear Safety Glasses (and hearing and dust protection when needed) when working or, around people who are working.
 
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Old 12-15-05, 10:36 PM
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home depot has a Ryobi on sale for 19 bucks, same circular saw I have. It's a good saw, and for 19 bucks you can't beat it, I paid 49 bucks for it a couple of years back.
 
 

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