Corded Drill

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  #1  
Old 12-15-05, 04:48 PM
dryflyangler
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Corded Drill

Hi All,

Looking to buy my first "good" drill. I have a cheapie 12v 3/8" cordless Firestorm drill that I got as a gift several years ago. It is still kicking but lacks the power if you want to do more than drill some small holes and put in screws around the house. I think I have decided on a corded drill as they are cheaper and I really don't mind having a cord around as I am not a pro who is using it all day. Have recently needed to use 1/2" drill bits and needed to borrow. Got me to thinking that I should get a 1/2" drill instead of a 3/8" drill. I know it will be heavier and bulkier but seems like I could cover lots of ground with it. Small bits, big bits, etc as I get into more projects. Does this sound like good reasoning? I want to buy something that I will have for a long time. Have read some really good reviews on the Milwaukee 0234-6 1/2" drill. Seems like it would do the trick but am I missing something?

Thanks for all replies as usual!

DryFly
 
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Old 12-15-05, 05:41 PM
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I have that corded drill and it does a fine job. It is not that much heavier than a good 3/8" drill, so weight is not a huge issue. However, it is meant for serious drilling and you are not likely to do serious drilling as much as you think you will. The difference is that it only runs 850 rpm while a good 6 amp 3/8" drill will run 2500 rpm and still has plenty of power. Most of the bits that you will use come with a shank that will fit the 3/8 as well as the 1/2.
As far as price is concerned, that 1/2" drill will typically be about twice the price of the 3/8" new retail. Most of the difference is in the gearing. If you like the brand, consider the 3/8" version of the same drill. It's just as durable and will meet your needs better. If the 3/8" won't handle it, go rent the Hole Hawg for a day to drill 4-5/8" holes in wood at 300 rpm.
 
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Old 12-15-05, 05:51 PM
dryflyangler
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Thanks IBM

Do you consider the 3/8" version of that same brand to be as respected as the 1/2"? Another thing I am confused on is there seems to be multiple models in each brands category. There might be 3 different 3/8 in drills made by the same brand. What is the reason for the difference and what should I look for?
 
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Old 12-15-05, 06:39 PM
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milwaukee hole shooter , check out pawn shops . or ebay
 
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Old 12-15-05, 06:51 PM
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See various tool reviews on the internet for specific model recommendations. Newer models typically have more plastic in them to decrease weight. Some models are only different in the type of chuck offered.

Refurbed and used drills can represent value at a reduced price.
 
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Old 12-15-05, 07:43 PM
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Oh come on, guys! One drill? Go to the store and compare and buy what you think is the best choice. Down the road you're going to buy more. Five years ago I didn't own a single drill and now I have six hand drills and a drill press.
 
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Old 12-15-05, 08:29 PM
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I thought this was interesting
http://www.worxpowertools.com/
At first I thought it was a gimmick
But I'm always looking for ways to take the stress off the joints when working
Then it started to make sense
I have only found one guy who tried them at a demo (they're pretty new)
He tried the circ saw and the recip saw
He said they seemed pretty beefy and worked well
They have a 3/8 vari-speed drill and a 1/2 vari-speed hammer drill
I've had my eye out for them, but I haven't tried any yet
 
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Old 12-15-05, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by J.M.C.
Oh come on, guys! One drill? Go to the store and compare and buy what you think is the best choice. Down the road you're going to buy more. Five years ago I didn't own a single drill and now I have six hand drills and a drill press.
I stopped counting after 6, not including air drills, I think I need 2 more the short stubby 90 deg. ones.

Milwaukee Is a good choice. some of their tools have a cord that plugs into the handle like the one your thinking about, makes it easy to replace if your dog hides the cord, but the replacement cord cost about $26.00

I think you have a choice fixed cord for less money. maybe a different chuck, variable speed or 2 speed, forward/reverse for driving screws.

You need two drills, both with variable speed and forward/reverse.
First, the 1/2" one your looking at is good with a fixed cord.
Later a 3/8" +3000 RPM drill.

You do need a higher RPM drill when using smaller drill bits.
If you need to hold a bit larger then 3/8", you need the 1/2" chuck.
 
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Old 12-16-05, 06:44 AM
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I've been trying to kill a DeWalt 3/8" corded drill for years. It's been dropped countless times, one time into a snow bank while running. It's been left in the rain. I even used it with a socket adapter to drive about 75 1/2" x 12" lag screws into a trellis. The drill was so hot I needed a glove. The cord keeps wearing out near the handle, so I cut out the bad section and splice the ends together. The 6' cord it came with, is now under 3'. Despite the abuse this drill has taken, it is still 4x more powerful than my 12v cordless.
 
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Old 12-16-05, 12:31 PM
dryflyangler
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Thanks All!

Am leaning towards the 1/2" drill as the 12v 3/8" is till kicking for now. Will change that in the future (soon). One last question. Do keyless chucks work better on a higher quality drill or do you still get slippage? I am a pretty strong guy and I get lots of slippage with the cheapie 12v. Not because I am pressing too hard or anything but just drilling some fairly typical stuff.
 
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Old 12-16-05, 03:42 PM
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Ive been using chucks "keyless " for years , long before "keyless" chucks where evan around.

you can hand tighten a keyed chuck then use the key if your drilling something that requires it .

might be me but it seems the keyless chucks have more tendency to slip than the keyed chuck tightned by hand
 
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Old 12-16-05, 06:00 PM
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DEWALT, can't beat them.
 
 

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