Moisture and pneumatic tools.


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Old 01-06-06, 12:35 PM
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Moisture and pneumatic tools.

I recently bought a brad nailer to use with my compressor. But I have heard that when using pneumatic tools that you should attach a filter of some kind onto the compressor to block moisture from getting into the tool and damaging it. Is this true? I also had someone tell me that they used pneumatic tools with no kind of filter and had no problems.

If I do need some type of filter to block moisture, what would be some good ones to look at?

Thanks.
 
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Old 01-06-06, 12:40 PM
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Akerfeldt, Welcome to the DIY Forums.
I have yet to see a filter that takes out all the moisture from a compressor. They DO help and I use a Norgren filter and an oiler combination. Air oil keeps the tools lubricated. You do not want to use the oiler if you are spray painting. Draining the compressor before each use also helps. Good luck.
 
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Old 01-06-06, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Akerfeldt
... I have heard that when using pneumatic tools that you should attach a filter of some kind onto the compressor to block moisture from getting into the tool and damaging it. Is this true?
Yes
Originally Posted by Akerfeldt
I also had someone tell me that they used pneumatic tools with no kind of filter and had no problems.
Also true

The best way is to have a filter
Occasional use it's not really a big deal
 
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Old 01-06-06, 02:08 PM
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If your gun calls for daily oiling, such as Bostitch, do it. Senco on the other hand doesn't require oiling, so having an oiler in line may not help the senco situation. It is much easier to remember to oil it every day you use it. The force of air will expell moisture just as fast as it aspirates it so lubrication helps to keep rust, etc. from forming.
 
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Old 01-06-06, 02:32 PM
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I've always felt that the 2 gallon compressors should come with tiny water filters on them since the ones that you buy are kinda big. If I don't have a filter, (for example, on my 1 gallon specialty baby unit), I just be sure to oil guns frequently.

By the way, my Bostitch finish nailer is ceramic, meaning 'no oil'. And my Senco specialty stapler (not crown) does require oil. I scribe right on each gun, 'no oil' or 'oil' so I never make a mistake among the many guns.
 
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Old 01-06-06, 03:54 PM
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Thanks for the replies.

My nailer does require a few drops of oil upon each use. The tool won't be used daily....so would no filter and a few drops of oil be okay or should I still invest in some type of filter?
 
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Old 01-06-06, 03:58 PM
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Always invest in a filter if you can afford it.
 
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Old 01-06-06, 05:03 PM
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I've used the same compressor and guns for 20 years. No filter, no oiler, no problems. The guns that require oil get oiled. The ones that don't (Senco) don't. Only thing that's gone wrong w/ my air tools is the Bostich Roofing gun recently blew out a trigger valve (plastic piece inside cracked). Replaced it myself for $12, it's back in business.

I have a twin tank compressor and regularly empty the moisture. I would suppose the temperature and humidity in your climate- as well as the style of compressor- all play a role in how much moisture gets in the lines. I'm not opposed to filters, but I guarantee that if I had one on mine, I'd accidentally break it off every month.

A filter certainly would not hurt anything if you decide to get one. Better safe than sorry they say.
 
 

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