Tool ID


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Old 01-08-06, 03:05 PM
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Tool ID

Hello,
I'll be needing that tool that allows one to drill into wood at an angle. What is it called?
 
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Old 01-08-06, 03:51 PM
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I believe you are talking about a Pocket Hole Jig. Kreg is the most well known manufacturer but I am sure there are others. Good luck with your projects.
 
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Old 01-08-06, 04:16 PM
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CMT and PSI also make one. I've got the Kreg Pro pack. Love it!
 
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Old 01-08-06, 05:14 PM
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I got the Kreg too. I just wish I could use it on MDF, then life would be sweeter.
 
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Old 01-08-06, 07:15 PM
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Tool ID

Thanks All,
I am rebuilding my stairway and will need the pocket hole jig to attach the railings to the newels.
 
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Old 01-08-06, 07:44 PM
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What do you mean, lugnut? I've done MDF without problems?
 
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Old 01-09-06, 02:13 PM
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No kidding! Interesting, tell me more! I tried it on some scrap and it just isn't strong. I know you can drill the pocket into solid wood products, then finish to fasten to mdf, but I don't see how you could ever drill a pocket into mdf. Have you actually done that? Also, mdf is known to have good screw holding power on the face, but never on edge,,, and a pocket hole is like screwing on edge.

I keep editing to add more. lol. For clarity, I would not drill a pocket into mdf to joint a cabinet carass to a faceframe. Maybe for less demanding projects or whatever.
 
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Old 01-09-06, 05:48 PM
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I've joined face frames, attached them to cabinets, joined wide miters on 1x4 MDF, I haven't noticed a problem. You certainly wouldn't do pull-ups on it or anything- it's just holding stuff together until the glue dries, (I pretty much glue everything) so any shear strength from the screw is just kind of a bonus in my mind.

I also use the coarse Kreg self-starting pocket screws on MDF- it's imperitive to use the washer heads because a bugel head- like a plain old drywall or deck screw has- will cause the MDF to blow out and smash.

You're right about the screw not being "AS" strong when used in MDF side grain to side grain... but you don't normally use pocket screws as a "load bearing" joint anyway.

I'm sure you have the Kreg manual, but if not, here's a link: http://www.kregtool.com/education_ce...g_pro_pack.pdf

It specifically mentions using course threaded screws with MDF, and toward the end of the PDF, it gives 5 suggestions when working with pocket screws in melamine and MDF.
 
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Old 01-09-06, 05:51 PM
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Tool ID

Hello Again,
I just checked out the Kreg R2xxx Rocket Pockethole System and I have a few more questions.
The assessorys list 1-1/4 coarse or fine pockethole screws. I believe these screws are too short for my application. I am installing oak railings and newels.
First: What is so special about these screws and can I use longer and differant screws with the Rocket Pocket jig? Can I use ordinary wood screws?
Second: Are instructions available in the use of this jig?
Third: Would you use the pockethole technique to put together oak railings to newels?
Fourth: What would be the recommended screw thread, coarse or fine?
 
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Old 01-10-06, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by rjordan392
First: What is so special about these screws and can I use longer and differant screws with the Rocket Pocket jig? Can I use ordinary wood screws?
They are truss syle heads and are thinner than normal shafts. You could use other common screws with a lessor degree of success.
Originally Posted by rjordan392
Second: Are instructions available in the use of this jig?
Yes.
Originally Posted by rjordan392
Third: Would you use the pockethole technique to put together oak railings to newels?
No because the pocket would show and need to be 'plugged'.
Originally Posted by rjordan392
Fourth: What would be the recommended screw thread, coarse or fine?
Fine thread for hard woods, coarse threads for soft wood.

I think the 1 1/4" screws are for 3/4" lumber. Longer screws for thicker lumber, shorter for thinner.
 
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Old 01-10-06, 03:17 PM
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watching norm on new yankee workshop the other day and he was saying the screwhead style helps pull the work tight .
 
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Old 01-10-06, 04:18 PM
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Man, I'm glad I didn't answer the initial post. I was going to suggest a Hole Hog. Hey, it will drill at an angle, and make holes. I think one of my next investments will be one of the pocket hole jigs. I use biscuits alot, but can see where this application is much stronger, especially on rails and stiles of cabinets.
 
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Old 01-10-06, 04:49 PM
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Chandler, i'd recommend the Mini Kreg pocket hole kit... it's only $18 or so for the single jig, drill bit & stop collar. A face clamp is $22 and right angle clamp is $27. A couple boxes of screws for $5 each and you're in business. More fun than going bowling on a Saturday night!

I use my pro pack all the time for attaching extension jambs to doors and windows. Comes in handy for putting on aprons occasionally, or joining miters on wide casing. Now that I have it, I don't know why I didn't get one sooner!
 
 

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