Will a 2 hp compressor run air tools?


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Old 01-06-06, 05:15 PM
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Hooking a extra tank to the compressor, advice?

My compressor tank isn't big enough to handle air tools for a long periods of time. I want to hook my compressor up to a 40gal galv. steel tank for extra air volume. The galv. tank is use and has some rust inside it. I cleaned and washed it out real good and think I have all the loose rust out. If there's still a little rust left inside, will that be alright to use?
 
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Old 01-06-06, 06:57 PM
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It depends on if the tank was manufactured for air pressure or not. It is a fine idea, especially if painting or using air sanders, sand blasters, etc. Don't put a check valve between the two as the blow off valve and control valve need to react to the presssure of both tanks.
 
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Old 01-07-06, 06:38 AM
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Will my compressor pick up all this little rust that may be in my add-on galv tank and send it through the line. Will I have a problem with this?
 
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Old 01-07-06, 12:30 PM
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That is why you run black pipe in gas or air situations. We also dry the air before running it through the black pipe to prevent rust. Galvanized pipe is galvanized on the outside and inside and it will eventually fleck off and become a stopper. You can put a filter on it after the galv tank and keep check on the bowl, as the solids will accumulate in it. If your tank is vertical, put a drain on it and let the solids out that way. Most likely the solids will fall to the bottom and won't become airborne.
 
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Old 01-14-06, 05:24 AM
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grantiman,

I would seriously reconsider using that galvanized tank on your system.
Without knowing exactly what that tank was originally for I would have to guess that it was for water service.
Regardless what pressures it was designed for, tanks that are used for water are not tested to the same level as those designed for compressed gasses.
Tanks for water are under hydrostatic pressure which has a much lower risk of harm should the tank fail.
Under hydrostatic pressure, a failure would release a very small amount of energy which results in the pressure being reduced almost immediately.
When a tank is used with a compressed gas, there is a great deal of stored energy available once a tank failure occurs to cause the failed material to continue to degrade, sending bits of shrappnel in all directions. In other words it can blow up!
This is the same effect that makes PVC or other types of plastic unsuitable for use as an air line.

Having said this, you also will need to reconsider the reason for wanting to install additional air storage.
The reason your compressor runs out of air is because it is too small.
Another air tank will not fix this.
It is a misconception that a bigger tank means more air because mfr's I believe are misleading people by the way they advertise compressor units in gallons instead of the meaningfull measurement of CFM.
Technically the system holds a very small amount of additional air with a larger tank but once the compressor starts after having cycled off, this effect has ended.
In simpler terms it may give you a few seconds of run time, not the minutes you need to complete the job you need to do.
There is a bit of info on this at the top of the forum which to summarize, would suggest you compare the CFM capacity @ 90 psi of your compressor to the CFM requirements of the tool you wish to use.

There are differing thoughts on oilers, all correct for certain circumstances.
I would suggest for home use, not using one and placing a drop of tool oil in the air connection would be the best compromise.
Any time you use an oiler you need to have hoses dedicated to tools that need to be oiled because there are some tools like certain nailers that don't take oil. You also don't want oil in any hoses you may use to dust off any woodworking projects.

When installing your piping run it is helpfull if there is a slight downward pitch toward the end of the run with drip legs before each rise and at the bottom of each drop and at the end, to help the system drain when not in use.
Drain taps are good to have on the bottom of the legs for quick draining.

This is my idea anyway.
 
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Old 01-14-06, 12:53 PM
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Thanks for the advice on the steel tank, I wasn't sure if that trick would have worked or not. Ok, back to square one, I have a 2 hp 14 gal compressor. I was given a air tool set with 3/8 air line for x-mas. I don't do alot of auto work, but it would be nice to use the compressor to fill up low tires, use the air gun to remove tires, or use the air chisel to break off a small bolt. I not sure if this compressor will handle it, thats why I thought of a add-on tank. I hate to have to go out and buy another new compressor, any ideas? Thanks..........
 
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Old 01-14-06, 03:08 PM
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Will a 2 hp compressor run air tools?

Ok, back to square one, I have a 2 hp 14 gal compressor. I was given a air tool set with 3/8 air line for x-mas. I don't do alot of auto work, but it would be nice to use the compressor to fill up low tires, use the air gun to remove lug nuts, or use the air chisel to break off a small bolt. I see nothing on this compressor about CFM's, and don't know if this unit will handle the tools. I'd really hate to have to go out and buy another new compressor, any ideas? Thanks..........
 
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Old 01-14-06, 03:14 PM
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You really have received the gift that keeps on giving.
Suggest to the giver that a new compressor could be the next gift on the list.

There are no tricks that will make your compressor produce more air than it was designed to.
Again, the specs that mfrs use to advertise home compressors are misleading.
Read the sticky where it is explained further but in a nutshell, saying you have a 2 hp compressor is meaningless.
This is not a standard measurement as the cfm rating @ 90 psi is.

Post the make and model number of your compressor and tools and I'll look them up for you.
 
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Old 01-15-06, 05:39 AM
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The only name on this tank is, Central Tractor, Mod # X89B200C-14.
The tools are Coleman, Powermate.
Would it help if I posted a pic of the compressor and tools?
 

Last edited by grantiman; 01-15-06 at 07:45 AM.
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Old 01-15-06, 09:37 AM
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A small compressor will run most air tools BUT... with less cfm recovery you can only use the tool for short burst. I have a 11 gal 1hp comp [my first] and it worked well considering its limitations. Often I would have to wait and let the comp catch up. Your compressor should do fine to air up tires, impact should work ok but you may occasionally need to break lug nuts loose by hand [4way, breaker bar] any air tool that is used steadily will likely not have enough air to be productive in a short while.

A small compressor is nice for the portability but a 60 or 80 gal with 6+hp works better for steady air flow. I now have a 60 gal 6 hp and never had need to let it catch up but if I need air at another location I still use my old little comp.
 
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Old 01-16-06, 05:15 AM
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How do you figure out the CFM's of a compressor?
 
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Old 01-16-06, 05:51 AM
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Sometimes it is printed on the compressor, if not it would be in the owners manual. You should be able to google for the info.
 
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Old 01-16-06, 07:35 AM
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I have a Central Tractor, 2 hp, 14 gal air compressor, mod.# X89B200C-14. Can't find the owners manual, and I can't find any info on a 2 hp, 14 gal. I need to know the CFM's of this compressor. Can anyone tell me where and how to look for this info? Thanks............
 
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Old 01-16-06, 10:29 AM
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I couldn't find any info on your compressor but at grainger.com there is a westward compressor, 2 hp - 13 gal which has 5.5 cfm @ 90 psi.
 
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Old 01-16-06, 10:36 AM
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Well, that's closer than I got. I have Coleman Powermate air tools, I think they said most of the tools in there uses 4.5 CFM. I guess I could run the tools off this compressor, but not for very long. My compressor reads for pressure, 120/90/120, what ever that means.
 
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Old 01-17-06, 09:16 AM
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Cfm

granitman,

You can get the CFM by simply coverting 11 gallons into cubic feet and measuring the pump up time. It won't be on the nose, as cfm decreases when pressure goes up, but will get you a ballpark figure. But why bother? Just hook up some tools to it and you'll soon discover what it can and cannot do. You don't want the pump to be on constantly. Judging by the offshore brand name, your pump most likely has a 50/50 duty cycle.

On the auxilary tank... If it's safe to use, figure out how long it'll take for the pump to fill it up to pressure. You may burn out your pump by making it run longer than it was designed for.
 
 

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