Emglo Air Compressor - Rebuilding


  #1  
Old 01-15-06, 02:54 PM
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Emglo Air Compressor - Rebuilding

I have an older Emglo AM78 1.5hp twin stack compressor. Lately it is having a hard time building up pressure and holding it. The oil is a little gritty so I want to change it as well. I am thinking it is time for a rebuild.

I downloaded the exploded view of the compressor from the Dewalt website. Does anyone know where I can get a rebuild kit/gaskets in Canada? Can I use 20 or 30 weight non detergent oil in this one? Has anyone done a rebuild on these Emglos/Dewalt compressors that could give me some pointers?

Thanks,

Bob
 
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Old 01-16-06, 02:16 PM
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the am78 uses reed valves in the head. most likely broken but possibly just cruddy. pop the head and lay out in order of removal. the valves a small steel rectangles . if not broken look for carbon deposits. i use 30w non detergent
 
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Old 01-23-06, 10:39 AM
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I took apart the head and cleaned up the reed valves. They were a little dirty and little oily. Put it all back together and it still has a really tough time building up pressure.

Seems like there is a lot of air blowing near the head when it is running.

Could it be rings or gaskets or something else?

Bob
 
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Old 01-23-06, 11:57 AM
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i think if it was a head gasket you would have seen that. don't forget there's a cooling fan blowing over the head. how much pressure will it build ? does it ever reach a shut off point ? if so, how does it do at re-start ? is your pressure gauge accurate? cleaning the reed valves may not always help. if they got hot they may have lost temper and not function properly. most of the time worn rings will lengthen the pump up time but not effect final pressure unless the are severly worn. you might also clean the check valve on the discharge tube.
 
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Old 01-23-06, 05:13 PM
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Ahhh.. that make sense with the cooling fan.

It will build upto 50psi fairly easily and then it just doesn't go much past that.
I notice if I turn off, then on again it builds a bit more pressure. I can get it upto 60psi. It won't reach shut off. As for the accuracy I'm not sure. I'll try to dig up another gauge.

I found a local supplier for reed valves so I will try that. Do I put a light coat of oil on them when putting them in again?

I will also clean the check valve...

Bob
 
  #6  
Old 01-23-06, 07:46 PM
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no oil , put the head together clean and dry. the 60 lbl part tells me it's likely a reed vave problem. do that before you look at the check valve. always change one thing at a time. besides, the check valve being bad would show up at restart making it difficult for the compressor to start up or a knocking sound coming from the tanks. i think you're on the right track. there is a compressor hear kit available without the rings . get that on e first. again ,,,, pay attention to the valve plate and reed sequence. can't stress this enough.
 
 

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