Combination Kits?


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Old 01-15-06, 03:48 PM
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Question Combination Kits?

I'd like to get a kit of the basic cordless tools (drill/driver, reciprocating saw, circular saw,.....). I've heard some good things about Ryobi because their replacement batteries cost about half as much as other brands. Is their quality good also?

Any suggestions?

Thanks,


Dan
 
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Old 01-15-06, 04:22 PM
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I bought a 18volt ryobi combo and Im into my third year so heres my asment on it .

overall happy would do it again.

my kit included

1/2 drill ..works great the switch broke on it just under two years I replaced it with the hammer drill that I had been looking at anyway . havent really looked into replacing the switch yet.

cirular saw.. I really like this very handy for me I just used it to cut a bunch of old fence 1x2 and 2x4 I carry it with me in the truck for trimming plywood

recpricating saw ... works great as far as im concerned it works as well as the makita corded one I used to have

jigsaw .. like it works well use it more than I thought I wwould

vaccum ..ok dont use it much

flashlight ..love it great addtion for me always have strong battries and I like the design with the swivel head.

chainsaw ..joke only used it a couple of times I use the recipicating saw with a pruning blade instead

I like the concept that here are other tools I can add with the same battries

my son was impressed enough using mine to go buy one of his own .

I dont think you will be sorry
 
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Old 01-15-06, 05:51 PM
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Again...I have to agree with Mango (sooner or later, you'll follow my comments ). I don't have the jigsaw, vaccum or chainsaw, but everything else is great. I also have the One+ Spiral saw, caulk gun (suprisingly helpful laying very long strips of cove base), 3 Speed Hammer drill and the Impact driver. I love them all. Very convenient being able to use with just one type of battery. From what I've heard, now is the time to get a combo kit as the prices may be down a little. Hope this helps

Matt
 
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Old 01-21-06, 05:08 PM
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I have a Craftsman 19.2 volt kit. It has the 3/8" drill with clutch and keyless chuck, the circular saw that has the features of the electric circular saws, and the fluourescent tube light that I keep handy when the power fails. Two batteries that charge in less than an hour, more like less than a half hour and it's fully charged. I have to say for what I paid for it and for as long as I've had it and used it a lot, I like it. Drawback for me is the weight. My arthritis complains when I use the drill too long. I'd purchase another kit again.
 
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Old 01-21-06, 11:02 PM
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I have to second on dread's comments. If I didn't have the Ryobi set, I would be looking into the Craftsman set as well. Very comparable. For your basic cordless with pretty good quality, I don't think you could go wrong either way...Ryobi or Craftsman.

matt
 
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Old 01-22-06, 05:20 AM
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If you are looking for a cordless "family", the best suggestion I can make is try them out in the store
You're looking at similar quality tools, some may have a slight edge here and others there, but the fit to you and your hands is the most important thing

You will be using the drill/driver the most
Try a few out for weight and balance
Hold it like your drilling up, down, sideways...

Hold the recip like you were cutting something
Does it feel comfortable?

Same with the circ, pretend you are cutting "up" on a wall
Now how about flat
The weight OK?

(vroom, vroom, noises are optional during this testing, and the salespeople get used to it after a while )

Regardless of what others think of a particular family, if the go-to tools are uncomfortable in your hands you will not enjoy using them

By the same token if they feel right you should get them
 
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Old 01-22-06, 06:38 AM
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Man i'm glad this post was here. A friend just purchased the Ryobi 3-Pc. 18V Cordless Tool Kit and I asked to use the Circular saw last night. He had not had a chance to use it yet so it had a new never used blade on it (the one that came with it) and a fresh battery. The saw would not cut a new 2x4 and I also tried ripping some cheap 1/4" plywood sheets with no luck at all on either. After 10 minutes I put the saw down and grabed my hand saw, thats how bad this one was. Any ideas on this? I'm really confused now after hearing everyones praise for the Ryobi circular.

Thanks
Jim123
 
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Old 01-22-06, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by jim123
...After 10 minutes I put the saw down and grabed my hand saw, thats how bad this one was. Any ideas on this? I'm really confused now after hearing everyones praise for the Ryobi circular.
Well, personally I don't care for any of the Ryobis
Except for the detail sander
In fact I just saw a poll in a contractor's forum
It was a what's your favorite tool brand poll
Ryobi was one of the choices
here's a snippet from the comments:

(post)
"i choose to not participate in this poll because ryobi was included in the list of choices...lol."
(reply)
"(I) threw that one in there because I read somewhere in here that a contractor uses these tools…I cant remember who…..but after my 1st Ryobi caught fire with under 60 minutes of run time, I never went back."

That doesn't mean it doesn't fit Mango Man's needs perfectly
I respect his opinion, and would probably try them out if I were in the market for a cordless family

It's just when you ask for opinions, generally people will recommend what they have
The recommendation might not be the best choice for the individual

For example, I wouldn't use a Craftsman drill/driver if you gave me one
Really, I'd give it away
I've had a few and used more
They don't hold up for me, and don't fit well and aren't weighted well for me
I find them lacking in power, longevity, and awkward to use
That doesn't mean they wouldn't be just right for someone else

Originally Posted by jim123
...After 10 minutes I put the saw down and grabed my hand saw, thats how bad this one was. Any ideas on this? I'm really confused now after hearing everyones praise for the Ryobi circular.
That's why I suggest trying them out
The sales people get used to you after a while
The local tool shop will even let me start them up (maybe that was les scary to the other customers than me making those vroom noises), or sometimes set something up out back so I can try them out

The "Tent/Demo" or "Trailer" sales in front of the tool shop are great places for this
 
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Old 01-22-06, 12:27 PM
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jim123,
I've encountered a couple of problems with my circ saw. I don't/haven't used that much of my saw yet. Having experienced what I have though, I will be getting a corded 7 1/4 circular saw. I'm not recanting my "I'm happy with the tools", but if I had to pick out the weaker of my set, it would probably be the circular saw.
Slickshift posted of a contractor's site. I did look at the site, and those quotes are definitely there. These are post and quotes from people who make their living off their choice of tools. If it was my business on the line...nope, probably not Ryobi on the top of my tool list. However, for DIY work around home, and my first "real" tool set, I'm happy with Ryobi. This isn't to say down the road I may "upgrade", but for the time being, they are good, around the house tools. I just can't afford the higher quality "pro" tools yet (I mean my wife hasn't given me the ok to spend more )This is my experience and opinions only. I'm not disagreeing with Slickshift, just maybe providing a little more from the other side of the coin.
 
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Old 01-22-06, 04:45 PM
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I needed to cut some 1/2" plywood. I made sure my battery was fully charged. I clamped the sheet of plywood down to a solid bench. I set the little saw to cut the correct depth and cut the plywood so fast that I could hardly believe it. It cut as well as my 7 1/4" electric circular saw. I don't use these tools to make a living but I use them hard and often. My Craftsman kit is 19.2 volts, it came with the little circular saw, the 3/8" drill, two batteries and charger, and a flourescent lamp/light. I like the kit. I've used the light durings several hours of blackouts and it throws an amazing amount of light and last longer than the blackouts do. I have run the battery down to "dead" using the drill, but I always have the other battery on charging so I can quickly switch batteries. So far, I haven't had any problems with the tools or with the power to do any job. I like the drill for driving screws. The clutch keeps me from putting the screws in too far and stripping the threads and heads off the screws. I've used the drill for sheetmetal screws, wood screws, tightening nuts on bolts, removing hard to reach screws and bolts, just about anything up to 1/2" or so. I put a socket on it and set the clutch and get things done quickly. Would I buy another one? Yes. I don't know what I'd do without it now.
 
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Old 01-23-06, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by jim123
Man i'm glad this post was here. A friend just purchased the Ryobi 3-Pc. 18V Cordless Tool Kit and I asked to use the Circular saw last night. He had not had a chance to use it yet so it had a new never used blade on it (the one that came with it) and a fresh battery. The saw would not cut a new 2x4 and I also tried ripping some cheap 1/4" plywood sheets with no luck at all on either. After 10 minutes I put the saw down and grabed my hand saw, thats how bad this one was. Any ideas on this? I'm really confused now after hearing everyones praise for the Ryobi circular.

Thanks
Jim123
I'm surprised. I've used the 18v Ryobi several times to cut 1/2 plywood without any problems, as long as I had a fresh battery. Something must be wrong with that particular saw. Normally I would use a corded saw for multiple cuts of plywood and reserve the cordless for trim work, hard to reach work, or too lazy to get the corded saw out work.

For the DIY, I would not hesitate to recommend the Ryobi. As to the Craftsman, have not used it. How does it compare to the Ryobi as to the cost of the batteries?

Don
 
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Old 02-04-06, 02:29 AM
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Dewalt 4 piece combo

Hi. About two years ago, we had a bad power problem that fried most of the electrical and electronic gear in the house.

With the insurance money, I decided to buy a replacement battery drill. I bought a PC. While I like PC products, I found the design of the PC cordless drill to be horrible. The handle was horrible. After just a few minutes use it would wear a blister between my thumb and forefinger.

So, I took it back to HD and bought a Ridgid 4 (I think it was 4) piece kit including drill, circ saw, etc. My initial impression was that it was pretty good overall. That is, until I drilled a hole with the drill. I quickly noticed that the chuck wasn't centered. With a small bit, it wobbled pretty badly.

So I took the set back and forked over the cash for a Dewalt 4 piece set - Drill/driver, reciprocating saw, circular saw and light. Since I'm just wanted something for relatively simple house projects, I didn't really want to spend the money. However, when I tried the drill in the store, I found the comfort level to be great and it felt very solid. The chuck spun very true and centered.

After two years, the tools are still great. The tools are just as good as the day I bought them. I use the drill several times a month; it still feels great in my hand and the chuck is still centered and spins smoothly. The circ saw saved me massive grief about a month ago when I need to cut away a 2X4 in a very tight space. So far, I've used it on everything up to a 2X6 with no problem. I only used the recip saw once to repair a fence, but it worked very nicely. Even the light is nice to have in some cases. (I have other flashlights though.)

I STRONGLY recommend the Dewalt kit. Frankly, it is the single best set of tools I've ever had!

Regards,

Dan.

p.s. This week I bought a miter saw for an upcoming project. First I went with a 10" Ryobi. Lots of features, nice looking and great price. During setup, I noticed that it was aligned perfectly. That's the good news. Then I noticed that the head wabbled badly during use. No way to get an accurate miter.

So I took it back and bought a 10" Ridgid. The finish wasn't as good, but it was much more solid than the Ryobi. But I found that it wasn't aligned. And then I found that it could NOT be aligned. With the alignment bolts in the maximum skewed position, it was still out of alignment about 1-2 degrees.

So I took it back and got a 10" Dewalt DW703. Features were relatively poor. No laser. No bed extensions. But it was solid as a rock. And, it was aligned perfectly. And, setup took about 10 minutes. It was even more solid than the Ridgid and ran very smoothly. I added an Irwin laser guide ($30 at Lowes) and it works flawlessly.

So Dewalt is kind of conservative and a little pricey. But their products seem to work very nicely. Now I'm a happy camper. I'll give up whiz bang features for good performance any day.
 
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Old 02-04-06, 10:14 PM
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[QUOTE=dan_public] I added an Irwin laser guide ($30 at Lowes) and it works flawlessly.QUOTE]


Did you have to do any "engineering" to get the laser to mount correctly and reliably on your 703? I wonder if it will work on a 708 (slide miter)...
 
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Old 02-06-06, 06:44 PM
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On topic. IMHO: I agree with slickshift. I personally haven't used a Ryobi tool I liked. I gave my Ryobi 12V drill to my wife, it was just right for her. I had a BT2000 "table saw" for a day. It just felt cheap. Got a Grizzly instead. I have not tried anymore of Ryobi's cordless tools though.


On the drifted to topic: Lasers on compound miter saws. I upgraded my 10" craftsman 2 years ago and while at "The Woodworking Shows", I saw the Dewalt DW706 R 12" TWINLASER and had to have it. They were selling them at a show price of $299. And they were sold out, but would ship me one for the show price, free shipping. Seeing the dissapointment on my face the Dewalt rep pulled me aside and said. "The Dewalt, Delta and Porter Cable twin-lasers are all made by the same company.They are the same saw just trimmed out differently." Sure enough I checked the Delta booth and the PC booth and he was not lying. Since I have some PC stuff and lots of Dewalt I bought the Delta 36-255L for $299. (you can get them off the shelf now for less than that).

I initially thought the lasers were just a gimmick, but I was very wrong. Once you true the lasers to the blade kerf this thing cuts perfect every time. Even if you want to just take off 1/64", just line it up and cut away. I hardly even mark my wood anymore, just lay the tape measure on it, slide the wood until the laser is on the mark, close tape and cut. Sweet.
 
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Old 02-07-06, 01:06 PM
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Laser worked well

[QUOTE=Pipsisiwah]
Originally Posted by dan_public
I added an Irwin laser guide ($30 at Lowes) and it works flawlessly.QUOTE]


Did you have to do any "engineering" to get the laser to mount correctly and reliably on your 703? I wonder if it will work on a 708 (slide miter)...

Hi. I very much wanted a Dewalt laser and was surprised that their laser only works on the hi-end miter saws. So, I was a little aprehensive about using the Irwin laser. First, because I wanted a Dewalt laser and second because I'm not a real fan of Irwin products.

It turns out that I had no problem getting the laser installed. And, it worked perfectly the first time. I noticed that it was almost perfectly accurate with the saw arm in the top position. As I moved it down closer to the wood, the laser line moved away from the cut line by about 1-2 millimeters.

Over all, I am very happy with the Irwin laser.

Regards,

Dan.
 
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Old 02-22-06, 12:25 PM
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Ryobi is OK for occasional user

I would call myself a pretty heavy DIY'er

For years I've gotten by on just a Panasonic 12V cordless drill - they make great drills

But a couple of years ago, I saw the Ryobi set described above for $279 and decided to take the plunge. I haven't been too disappointed - I've used them quite a bit, pretty hard sometimes. The only thing I don't like is the battery life, and now after two years I definitely need new batteries, but they offer those cheap at Home Depot. (my panasonic 12v batteries finally need replacement after about 9 years)

My most used are the drill and the recip saw.

The Ryobi Drill is excellent - I haven't found a thing it can't do. The recip saw is OK - nowhere near the power of a corded saw - but works fine for quickie jobs. The jigsaw works pretty well - although it doesn't track the best. The Vac is a little disappointing - makes a lot of noise. The circular saw is pretty low on power and eats the battery up fast - but will cut plywood OK. The chainsaw is worthless - as stated above. I also bought a laminate cutter, and it worked fine for the small job I had. The light is handy.

I've been eyeing the Milwaukee 28V tools for a couple months now - but I haven't pulled the trigger. I don't need a better drill than the Ryobi, but I could probably use the better recip saw and circular saw. Still it's a lot of money. If I were using them every day, I'd do it in a second - but today, if the light duty tools can't do the job, I've got corded tools for backup.

My 2 cents
 
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Old 02-23-06, 06:31 AM
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36v

FYI, our local Lowes had a moving Dewalt trailer/display last week. They are coming out with 36V tools that are lighter than their 18V. I think June is the release date. (I suspect that Rapture is on their waiting list )

Again, for the occasional usage, and because of price, I like my Ryobi.

Don
 
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Old 02-23-06, 09:15 AM
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im seeing peaple unhappy with the 28volt milwaukee

really I guess it depends on usage , ryobi does fine for me

I got almost 6 years out of my ryobi 14 volt battries , the 18 volt died after a little more than two years but then 39 for a two pack replacement didnt hurt much .
 
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Old 02-23-06, 09:43 AM
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Combobination Kit

Hi, I do not know about Ryobi, I have bought a DEwalt combination set of tools from, a DC4KITA, it cost me $499 online, the store was www.cordlessdrillworld.com

I as happy with the DEwalt, everyhing has loads of power and it should last a long time, dont really need the torch but the rest of the stuff is great.

cheers
Simon
 
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Old 02-23-06, 11:56 AM
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Don,

I will have to check out the prices and see if I can "justify" some Dewalts. I will probably do a little wishful thinking. Not sure though. I think I going to get a new digital SLR camera first. My film camera is getting old. That may put tools on hold for a little bit. Those things are pricey.
 
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Old 02-24-06, 06:46 PM
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Battery-powered tools are great! Except for the batteries. They just don't seem to last. I firmly believe that these kits are loss-leaders and the real profit is made selling batteries for them. I've had my Crapsman 19.2V drill for almost 2 years now, and the batteries just don't hold a charge like they should.

In 1994 I bought a nice Makita 12V 1/2-inch drill. Light, handy, powerful. Then a couple years ago neither battery would hold a charge. I pooped my pants when I found that a replacement cost $60. That's when I bought the Sears drill. Drill, 2 batteries, bag, charger, stud-finder, and bit-kit for $69.

I would really like to see an AC adapter that one could plug into 120 VAC so the tool could be used while the batteries are charging. I know I'll not replace my 30-year-old circ saw with a battery-powered one anytime soon.
 
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Old 02-25-06, 04:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Pipsisiwah
... the batteries.... just don't seem to last.
That's the way it is
I figure if I get 2 years out of them I'm doing OK
3 I'm ahead of the game
The larger the V the less time you get put of them
It's part of the price you pay for the convenience
 
 

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