Miter Saw blades


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Old 01-18-06, 12:38 AM
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Miter Saw blades

I don't understand the difference in blades. I get it, that some have less/more teeth than others...but, for some reason, I can't figure why. Is there anyone out there that could shed some light?

thanks
matt
 
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Old 01-18-06, 05:38 AM
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The more teeth = finer cut.

Go here:

http://www.wissen-elektrowerkzeuge.d...aw_blades.html
 
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Old 01-18-06, 11:42 AM
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Duh...

Thanks Tow Guy. That helps me a lot! I felt weird asking. I hope I'm not the only one that didn't fully understand
 
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Old 01-18-06, 02:22 PM
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You also have normal kerf and thin kerf blades which allow different type cuts. Thin kerf blades are, well, thinner, and give finer cuts, while the normal kerf blades are great for building decks, cutting dimension lumber, etc. However, the drawback to thin kerf blades, is they tend to buckle under heavy load. It does no harm, it just doesn't make a happy cut. Just more to muddy up the water. Basically, the more teeth and the thinner the blade, the smoother the cut.
 
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Old 01-18-06, 04:12 PM
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I got 4 fancy blade catalogs the other day from a friend who is a blade sharpener/ blade dealer. I had no idea there were so many blade types. They have blades that are specifically made for almost every type of product... it's unbelievable. The thickness of the blade, the WIDTH of the teeth, the TYPE of teeth (grind), the KERF of the teeth, the COMBINATION of teeth used on each blade, the HOOK or rake angle of the teeth, plus other blade features such as the depth of the gullet (area between teeth) and expansion slots, anti-vibration qualities, and other factors that aren't as easily seen- quality of steel used, heat treatment, hardness of carbide used, flattening tensioning, honing... its unbelievable.

I don't look at blades the same way anymore since I got my Everlast blade. And it's not even top-of-the-line!
 
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Old 01-19-06, 05:20 PM
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Blades for every product? Hmmmm. I have a upcoming job to cut 3x6 thin plexiglass. I have done this before with a fine blade, but always with some intrepidation, lol. Is there a 'recommended' blade for plexiglass?
 
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Old 01-19-06, 06:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Lugnut
Blades for every product? Hmmmm. I have a upcoming job to cut 3x6 thin plexiglass. I have done this before with a fine blade, but always with some intrepidation, lol. Is there a 'recommended' blade for plexiglass?

Yes, its called a WaterJet
 
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Old 01-19-06, 09:07 PM
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My Everlast catalog recommends the PC860, PC1080, PC1280. It's a TC45 (Modified triple chip blade), .072 plate, .106 kerf, 5 degree hook (rake). The 10 and 12" blades are 80 tooth.

It says "Ideally suited for cutting plastics where melting is a problem- such as acrylic, plexiglass, lucite, ABS, lexan, and PVC."

The Systematic catalog also recommends a triple chip grind blade, but theirs has a 10 degree hook (rake).

The Tenryu catalog varies from the above- they recommend an ATAF or ATAFR (alternate tooth alternate face or alternate tooth alternate face w/ raker) with 5 degree hook (rake) or a 0 degree hook for ultra clean cuts in thin plastic.

The greater the rake the more aggressive the cut, while 0 degree or negative rake will produce smoother cuts.

I normally cut acrylic with whatever blade happens to be on my table saw. (unless it's my finish blade!) YIKES!
 
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Old 01-20-06, 03:43 AM
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Lugnut: I think the trick for cutting plexiglas on a table saw is using a thin kerf blade, many teeth, and only make your cut through half the plexiglas, flip it end for end, and run it again. That way, you aren't likely to shatter the glas or heat it up too much. It has been my experience, and have had good luck with it.
 
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Old 01-20-06, 05:17 AM
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seems to me bandsaw with fine tooth blade was better for plastic as there was less hot blade in contact with the material .

I would go to the manufactures website and look for cutting tips
 
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Old 01-20-06, 01:05 PM
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Thanks for the info you guys. Now you got me really thinking since most plexi I cut is small or is not for finish work. But this one is both big and for finish work.

Bandsaw is better for sure, but too small for sheet goods.
 
 

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