DeWalt tools


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Old 02-06-06, 11:17 AM
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DeWalt tools

I've been talking to some of my friends and they feel that Dewalt tools are garbadge ever since they bought out Black and decker. Do you feel the same way?
 
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Old 02-06-06, 12:13 PM
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It depends on which yellow tool you are referencing. DeWalt CMS and SCMS are very competitive. The air compressors which were formerly Emglo, still work fairly well and are still used by professionals. I have an electric decking screw driver which works quite well. That's a very broad brush to apply to any tool vendor.

From whose point of view and by what criteria does a tool qualify as garbage? A simple yes/no opinion without qualification is not very helpful for avoiding the duds and finding the deals.
 
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Old 02-06-06, 03:01 PM
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Its my understanding that B&D bought DeWalt, not the other way around. Seems they also bought Porter Cable and Delta, maybe others too. A change in ownership of a company rarely changes their production methods or parts suppliers.

I have several DeWalt tools, several Porter Cables, even a B&D or two, all work quite well. I wouldn't call any of them garbage. Some folks I've talked to are even of the opinion that the quality of B&D tools has gone up since they acquired the others, possibly due to new R&D info that was previously secret from them.

What do your friends feel are still decent tools?
 
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Old 02-06-06, 05:18 PM
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Basicly, the only dewalt tools that we find are crap are the new angle grinders. The paddle switches break easily. But we run the grinders all day so they really get a workout. I have a dewalt 18volt hammerdrill that i bought a few years back and it works great. I just bought another dewalt 18volt hammerdrill last month, but i didn't get a chance to use it yet so i don't know how it works.

My buddies and other welders are now using Metabo grinders and hands down they are the best.
 
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Old 02-06-06, 08:08 PM
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My Favorite tool to use happens to be a porter cable door mortiser, bought second hand, and new bearings installed. As a locksmith, I sometimes have to mortise doors for Baldwin, Kaba Ilco, and locks of this type. What a time saver it is. Expensive? Yes. Worth all the effort to get one? Yes.

cuedude
 
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Old 02-07-06, 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by richcharles
Basicly, the only dewalt tools that we find are crap are the new angle grinders. The paddle switches break easily. But we run the grinders all day so they really get a workout. I have a dewalt 18volt hammerdrill that i bought a few years back and it works great. I just bought another dewalt 18volt hammerdrill last month, but i didn't get a chance to use it yet so i don't know how it works.

My buddies and other welders are now using Metabo grinders and hands down they are the best.
I've heard that about the DeWalt grinder switches too. My grinder is a Ryobi, its a cheapie but does the trick as I don't need it often.

My cordless hammer-drill is actually a Black & Decker, one of the newer 24 volt "Firestorm" models. I've had it quite a while and use the heck out of it, never had the first problem.

I also have a B&D 18 volt cordless recip saw that has given excellent service. For bigger jobs I have a DeWalt corded recip but the B&D is fantastic for knocking limbs off trees and such. After Wilma we had no power and I was able to clear a tremendous amount of tree (and back porch) debris with the 2 batteries I keep charged. Both these B&D tools were money well spent for me.
 

Last edited by wreckwriter; 02-07-06 at 04:41 PM. Reason: duh, my grinder isn't Bosch, its Ryobi....
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Old 02-08-06, 02:29 AM
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Junk?

Your friend has his wires crossed. Dewalt performs well for home use as well as for the professional. I see guys on the job sites, dog the heck out of thier Dewalts, and they stand up to it.

I own alot of dewalt tools, and the only problem I have encountered is on my palm sander. The swich went bad.

Dewalt tools that I own:

706 model compound miter saw
palm sander
3/8" drill
Drywall screw gun (2)
jig saw
reciprocating saw


Other good brands to consider are Makita, and Milwaukee............they make some very nice tools
 
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Old 02-08-06, 05:40 AM
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Originally Posted by richcharles
I've been talking to some of my friends and they feel that Dewalt tools are garbadge ever since they bought out Black and decker. Do you feel the same way?
Hi. I'm pretty much a typical amateur home owner, but I've had very good luck with Dewalt tools. I own the 4 piece, 18V combo kit (drill, circ saw, recip saw and light), and a DW703 miter saw (which I just purchased).

The only downsides are that the DW703 doesn't com with more attachments and Dewalt does not not make a laser for it (I bought an add-on Irwin laser). And the tools in general are a little pricey compared to their competition. That's all.

The upsides are that they are all solid and well made. I've owned the combo kit for two years with zero problems! The miter saw was perfectly aligned and the pretty much completely assembled when I took it out of the box.

I purchased each of these after buying other brands and taking them back. The Dewalt combo kit was purchased after first trying a Porter Cable cordless drill (uncomfortable and caused a blister in my hand after a couple of minutes use) and then Ridgid combo kit (drill chuck wobbled). I bought the Dewalt miter saw after buying and returning a Ryobi (saw head wobbled!) and a Ridgid (out of alignment and could NOT be aligned because of a manufacturing defect).

Are there better tools out there than Dewalt? I don't know. Maybe. I've used several Makita tools, and have had good luck with Porter Cable (except for the cordless drill) and Craftsman. Overall, I'm very happy with Dewalt; they are FAR from junk.

Regards,

Dan.
 
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Old 02-08-06, 05:59 AM
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Send to marketing department

"All DeWalt tools are garbage" amounts to no more than "new angle grinders whose paddle switches don't last". That sure is a leap of conclusion. This thread needs to go to the DeWalt marketing department as each poster tells about the great performance they have gotten out of their yellow tools.
 
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Old 02-08-06, 12:59 PM
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I've been using DeWALT tools for many years myself and have had excellent results with them. But, i'm not happy with the proformance of the 4 1/2 inch angle grinders. We (welders) do run the piss out of them, grinding all day, and of course the envrionment they are in (dust, sparks, etc.) I'm not saying all dewalt tools are bad, just their grinders.
 
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Old 03-29-06, 08:22 AM
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Being as Black and Decker bought Dewalt in 1960 and they didn't launch portable power tools under the Dewalt label until 1992, I'm not sure that anyone could have used a Dewalt tool that wasn't designed and manufactured by Black and Decker. So the suggestion that B&D cheapened up a great brand isn’t correct, IMHO.

The re-launch of the Black & Decker Portable Professional Power Tools in 1992 under the Dewalt brand name was nothing more than a Marketing coo. Their previous attempt at a Professional range under the “Black & Decker Professional” label failed miserably because they tried to beef up their DIY product, rather than start with a Pro-line.

I only know this as I worked in R&D at B&D from 1988-1996.

My own opinion is the Dewalt of today isn’t as robust as the Dewalt of the early ‘90’s because of the direction the industry has gone. People want cheaper more accessible tools and manufacturing methods only go so far in delivering that, eventually component quality has to be compromised. You can buy a Dewalt tool today for the price of a B&D tool in 1990.

I also worked for Makita from 1996-1998 and I would rate the component quality in the Makita product at that time to be far more superior to the Dewalt. The problem with the Makita product was it was just too expensive and they also cheapened their product lines to compete with Black & Decker/Dewalt.
 
  #12  
Old 03-29-06, 04:58 PM
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I have a DC980 drill that i absolutely swear by, im not a contractor but ive beat on that thing doing some heavy jobs, battery after battery it runs like a champ and never lets me down. I just got a DW716 double bevel 12" miter, although i havent had it long, im really happy with it. I think no manufacture can be a jack of all trades, but DW does a great job. although i donít use DW exclusively, im really satisfied with the equipment i do have from them.
 
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Old 03-30-06, 08:30 AM
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DeWalt power tools are not junk and I have been having good luck with them.I have a random orbitital sander,7.2 volt cordless screwdriver,3/8'' corded drill and an 18 volt cordless drill model no. dw987 that have been very good without any problems.Only thing I had done to my cordless drill is have the batteries rebuilt.Yes,cordless powertool batteries are rebuildable and here is a website: www.voltmanbatteries.com They rebuild power tool batteries and put updated cells.They have a high sucsess rate and rebuilding is cheaper than buying a new battery.You send the battery in with a payment of a check, money order,crdeit card(by calling in).You get the battery or batteries back in two weeks and all you do is stick them in the charger.There is a myth out out there on cordless tools and DO NOT do this:tape the trigger down to drain the battery down.It is a huge no no,It could cause the individual cells within the battery pack to reverse polarity,rendering the battery incapable to accept another charge.You will notice a drop in performance and the battery will not accept a recharge.If you want to prolong the life of cordless tool batteries,remove from the tool if not being used for a long time.They last longer that way.I am a life member of the Handyman Club of America and I read this from a magazine I get through them,Handy (I believe January/Feb. 2005).
 
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Old 03-30-06, 10:17 AM
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This is an easy one. The Dewalt tool line is pretty much an industry standard and for good reason. Almost all of my power tools are Dewalt and I swear by them. The designs are inovative and durable. I have in my arsenal

18v cordless pack: saws all, hammer drill, skill saw, trouble light,
12" sliding miter saw with the stand (love that stand bye bye rollers)
10" on site table saw
7 1/4" skill saw
planer

Like the table saw for example. It has rails that will extend way past the table on either side allowing for much wider rips. If I set that saw with just the dial and the gauge on the table to cut at 6 5/16" it cuts just that dead on. No more measuring with a tape from fence to blade.(putting credit where it's due I will note that the throat plate is a little junky and loose but not really a problem) The mitre saw I use most of all. Set square it stays that way and easy to adjust, both cut and bevel. The new ones will cut 18" and have bevel locks. The drill is awsome. I use it to mix thinset in a 5 gallon bucket. A job usually done with a big 1/2" corded. They are coming out with a 36V line but I am happy with my 18's. I have about used all makes of tools over the years. I remember when Milwaukee used to the biggest choice. Now you go to any job site you are going to see a lot of yellow. Just great products
 
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Old 04-13-06, 10:11 AM
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See The History of DeWalt for the complete story. No mention of B&D anywhere. In 1960 DeWalt Acquires United States and Canadian patent rights to Bennett Two-way Panel Saw from Richard C. Bennett Manufacturing Company, Laceyville, Pennsylvania.

From the B&D site The History of B&D in 1960 Alonzo G. Decker, Jr., son of the co-founder and a Black & Decker employee since 1930, succeeded Robert D. Black as president. Mr. Black continued as chairman of the board and chief executive officer. Black & Decker acquired DeWalt, Inc. of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, a manufacturer of radial arm saws and other stationary woodworking equipment in the U.S. and Canada.

*******************

Anyway, good reading info for anyone confused, or wanting something concrete to read.

As for DeWalt tools, I love them. I have a DeWalt random orbital sander, best dang sander Iíve ever used, and the dust collector really works. I also have a keyless chuck 3/8 drill, a Jig saw (A dream to use), and a reciprocating saw. All great tools.

Last year I decided to upgrade my 25 year or so old belt sander so I could have one that catches dust. I got a DeWalt DW432 belt Sander. Well, what a disappointment. The only improvement over my old Sears belt sander was that it is much quieter. So much so, that I donít need hearing protection, and thatís a plus. Itís a little heavier, but that doesnít bother me. My nit pick on this sander is that the dust collector does not collect one grain of dust at all. If I take it off, turn the sander on and look inside, I can see the fins turning, but for some reason not a single grain of dust ever makes it to the dust collector. This sander seems to create more of a mess on the working area than my old Sears belt sander did. I should have returned the sander, but I didnít.

Other than the non dust collecting of my belt sander, I am very happy with my DeWalt tools, and only buy DeWalt tools for now.
 
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Old 04-13-06, 10:46 AM
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well naturally there will be no mention of B&D from the Dewalt site. They are not going to want to seem affiliated with an inferior line of tools. B&D tools are garbage it always amazed me that they come from the same company. I don't own the dewalt belt sander. I almost got one but I ended up getting a makita as it was cheaper and lighter. Sometimes with the dust collection there is a switch to channel dust to the bag or away from you when your not using the bag. I have a jig saw that does that. Might want to check(probably not but can't hurt to look) Truthfully whenever I get a tool that has dust collection it is never used. I live in dust lol so it doesn't really bother me. Those bags just get in my way but I understand, it should work if it's there
 
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Old 04-13-06, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by BuiLDPro68
Sometimes with the dust collection there is a switch to channel dust to the bag or away from you when your not using the bag.
There is a switch to channel dust to the bag or away from you on the belt sander, but it doesnít make any difference which position the switch is in. Nothing goes to the bag.

On my DeWalt random orbital sander, that dust collector collects an absolutely amazing amount of dust. It will fill up in just a few minutes. Guess I got a lemon with the belt sander. It was the display sander, and the last one they had in the store. I should have waited till they got the next shipment in, or even taken it back for an exchange. The dust collector was the main reason for purchasing the sander. As far as actual use goes, the only improvement over my 25 year old Sears belt sander is that it is quieter. As for getting closer to walls or corners, there is no difference.
 
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Old 04-13-06, 03:34 PM
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DeWalt STILL not junk, but...

Hi. In a previous post above, I posted an opinion that DeWalt is not junk. I still have that opinion. I think they make decent products in general. However...

In the intervening two months since I last posted in this thread, my opinion has changed somewhat. I purchased the DW703 miter saw. I still think the saw is pretty good, but I realized that that it was the wrong size. I decided I needed a 10-12" sliding miter saw to handle larger lumber.

After much thrashing, I decided to buy the DW718. I read lots of reviews about the DeWalt 12 inch double-bevel sliding miter saws. I got mixed feedback, but in general many people thought that they were great saws. However...

The night before I bought the saw, I realized something was subtly wrong. After carefully rereading the reviews I noticed that the POSITIVE reviews were for the DW708 (718's predecessor) and the NEGATIVE reviews were for the DW718!!!

It appears that, while the DW718 has some very nice, new features, DeWalt cheapened the saw in the process. Overall the quality of construction is down slightly and the head is now soft. I.e., the DW718 head is not as good as the DW708!

At Western Tool in Woodenville, WA, I tested the DW718 head stiffness against the Bosch 4410L and Makita 10" sliding miter saws. The were side by side. The Bosch and Makita were very solid, with very little vertical and horizontal movement. The DW718 was noticably softer. With the slides completely extended, the Bosch and Makita barely moved even with a lot of pressure. OTOH, it was easy to move the DW718 head over 1/8" with just modest pressure.

I finally ended up with the a Bosch 4410L 10" miter saw. I've had it for a month and am quite happy with it. It is MUCH higher quality versus the DW718.

Also, in the last month, I started buying Festool Tools. They are amazing (but pricey). Using a car metaphor, the Dewalt would be at the Volkswagon level (pretty good quality and gets the job done). The Bosch and Makita tools (especially the Miter saws) are at the Mercedes/BMW level (excellent quality). The Festool tools are at the Rolls Royce level (truely amazing quality).

So, are Dewalt tools junk? No. But now I position them in the middle of the pack rather than at the high end.

Regards,

Dan.
 
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Old 04-13-06, 04:24 PM
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I had to take a look at the festool site. Didn't appear to be a big selection but I looked at that plunge cut skill saw they have with the rip fence. I'm sorry all that would just get in my way. For $420 I would expect to stay home while my saw went to work. $280 is pretty steep for a jigsaw too. $510 for the top of thier line cordless drill wow! Must be nice quality at those prices yikes!
I have looked at the new dewalt mitre saw at home depot but never used one I still have the DW708. I liked the bevel locks on the new one and the extra cut length but I can't speak to quaility since I haven't tried it. I looked at a bosch table saw but it didn't have the rip fence extensions and it was $100 more than the dewalt which works beautiful. So I don't know whatever works I guess
 
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Old 04-13-06, 05:01 PM
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Festools and DW708

Hi. I did say Festool tools were pricey! ;-)

The Festool circular saws are aimed more for cutting sheet goods than carpentry. The combination of the guide system and the circular saw makes ripping a 4X8 sheet of plywood quite easy.

Regarding their C12 drill, I thought the price was way too high before I purchased mine. But, the $500 price tag includes the drill and their chuck kit. The chuck kit includes a right-angle chuck and an offset chuck.

I bought mine because I needed a drill with a very short head to fit between sistered joists. Getting a specialized right angle drill (e.g., from DW and Milwaukee) would have cost over $200 and has limited usefulness to me. The Festool C12 was the only drill that I could find that met my needs. Now that I have it, I feel like it's easily worth the price.

Regarding the DW708... If DW had kept the quality when it came out with the DW716, I would have bought it.

If you doubt this, just perform this simple test. Take your 708 and extend the are all the way out. Push sideways and watch how much it flexes (probably not much). Now perform the same test on the 716. Big difference! Way more flex.

Now do the same with a Mikita or Bosch saw. Almost no flex.

To each his/her own, but I'm happy with my new tools.

Regards,

Dan.
 
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Old 04-13-06, 05:24 PM
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I guess if it flexed a little and I couldn't see it in my cuts I wouldn't worry about it but I expect a cut to be dead on which is has to be in a lot of the trim work I do. LIke I said I can't speak for it since I never used it. makes me happier with the one I have though thanks. That is one funny looking drill that festool. Looks like a Romulan disruptor lol. I would like to see one though don't think I will be buying
 
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Old 04-13-06, 06:01 PM
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Originally Posted by BuiLDPro68
I guess if it flexed a little and I couldn't see it in my cuts I wouldn't worry about it but I expect a cut to be dead on which is has to be in a lot of the trim work I do. LIke I said I can't speak for it since I never used it. makes me happier with the one I have though thanks. That is one funny looking drill that festool. Looks like a Romulan disruptor lol. I would like to see one though don't think I will be buying
Well, if you want to see a "Romulan disruptor" in person, Woodcraft is a stocking dealer. I visited the one in Seattle for the first time last Saturday. Overall, I was impressed with Woodcraft. And, they had a good supply of Festool tools and accessories (much better than the place where I bought mine).

If you're interested, they have a store in West Springfield, MA:

http://www.woodcraft.com/stores/store.aspx?id=559

Regards,

Dan.

p.s., I used to live in Framingham and Ashland, MA, and Nashua, NH.
 
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Old 04-13-06, 06:09 PM
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one thing I was surprised to see was it was only 12V Does it have the power of an 18V dewalt? Does it have a standard 1/2" chuck? Or does it only chuck the fast change bits? Also didn't seem to come with a removeable handle. I can stir concrete with the dewalt not to mention the hammer which I actually use for small masonry jobs more often then I thought I would. Does it have a hammer?
 
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Old 04-13-06, 07:28 PM
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Originally Posted by BuiLDPro68
one thing I was surprised to see was it was only 12V Does it have the power of an 18V dewalt? Does it have a standard 1/2" chuck? Or does it only chuck the fast change bits? Also didn't seem to come with a removeable handle. I can stir concrete with the dewalt not to mention the hammer which I actually use for small masonry jobs more often then I thought I would. Does it have a hammer?
-- Does it have the power of an 18V dewalt?
Yes and no. For a 12V drill, the C12 torque is amazing. But it's the control that is key. Torque is constant regardless of speed. No speed bursts. It is MORE controllable than my Dewalt.

-- Does it have a standard 1/2" chuck? Or does it only chuck the fast change bits? It can use either.

The C12's focus is woodworking, not carpentry. Its not a hammer drill. No hammering. No handle. For that, the Dewalt is probably better. That said, the Dewalt isn't a roto-hammer drill either. For drilling concrete, there are other choices that are better than the Dewalt too.

For woodworking activities, the C12 will be better most of the time. It weighs 3 lbs 13 oz, while the Dewalt weighs 6 pounds. I never noticed the Dewalt weight until I got the C12. NOW the Dewalt feels very heavy.

With it's quick disconnect chuck system, it offers much more flexibility than the Dewalt.

By quick disconnect, I'm referring to the chuck, not the bits in the chuck. Most drills have quick disconnects which are nothing more than accessories that let you change bits quickly. You get that with the C12, but the chucks themselves are quick disconnect.

You can change from the Centrotec (small, light) chuck to the BF-FX 13 FastFix (standard traditional chuck) in about 10 seconds. Or to the DD-AS right-angle chuck in 10 seconds. Or to the DD-ES eccentric chuck in 10 seconds. (I looked up the part numbers.) Or you can yank off all of the chucks and the center chuck connector is a bit holder itself. It takes a standard 1/4" screw bit.

It's not that I don't like my Dewalt 18V. It's that I like the C12 so much more.

Regards,

Dan.
 
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Old 04-13-06, 07:38 PM
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looks like it might be better for detail work but I need something a little more versatile. I want something that can go from stirring mud to driving finish screws. If I could afford it it would be nice for finish work I'm sure. The constant torqe would be real nice. Since you already have both drills seems like you got it covered. I know what the hammer on the Dewalt is capable of. Not much more than 3/16 or so but handy for small anchors.
 
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Old 04-20-06, 09:43 AM
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Garbage? I wouldn't say garbage..I would say there is nothing special about Dewalt tools. There are definately better brands of power tools like: Metabo, Festool & Panasonic Cordless. Depending upon what your looking for would depend upon which brand to go with.
 
 

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