Long hose on framing nailer


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Old 02-23-06, 08:02 PM
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Long hose on framing nailer

Is there a limit on how long a hose I can use with an air framing nailer? Will I lose power with say 150-200 feet of hose?
 
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Old 02-24-06, 04:34 AM
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The hose length will probably not be significant if it is larger diameter for the first 150 feet. Start with 3/8" or larger air hose and use couplings rather than quick-disconnects to reduce restrictions in the line if it's not a single piece of hose.
This technique is frequently used to keep the power cord for the air compressor as short as possible out at the temporary power pole on the site. The hose attached to the nailer can be the same or a smaller diameter which will reduce the weight you are dragging along. Set the compressor pressure close to the pressure limit for the nailers to be used.
 
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Old 02-24-06, 05:29 AM
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Absolutely. Like IBM5081 says, don't move the compressor -- add hose. The pressure at the end of 1000 feet of hose will be the same as at the end of a 50 hose for nailing purposes. For constant velocity, there will be a loss, but you will burn up your compressor if you add extension cords, especially one too small to handle the load.
 
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Old 02-24-06, 05:36 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler
but you will burn up your compressor if you add extension cords, especially one too small to handle the load.
Can you expand on this a bit Larry? Why is this a problem if one uses the proper sized cord (12 gauge for example)? My compressor has a sticker that says "do not use extension cord" but I have no easy power access on my back porch so I've been using a 50' 12 gauge cord. The cord is larger than the compressor's plug cord. How much risk am I taking?
 
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Old 02-24-06, 06:20 AM
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The longer the electrical cord, the more drop you see in voltage at the tool. Lower voltage means the compressor has to draw more amperage to get the job done, generating more heat, shortening the life of the motor. Almost an absolute rule with air compressors: add more hose, not more electrical cord if you have trouble spanning the distance between outlet and job.
 
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Old 02-24-06, 06:23 AM
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Tom: In your instance you won't have a problem. I use one, also, when the temporary pole is off the edge of a mountain. It is a 12 gauge "stranded" cord with a gfci in a quad box, so I don't have any voltage drop to speak of. That is the killer of compressors. Voltage drop with too small a cord. That is what most people do, rather than what you did, and it burns up their compressors, or melts their extension cords.
 
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Old 02-24-06, 06:29 AM
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OK, thanks guys. I think I'll get an extra length of hose just to be safe.
 
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Old 02-24-06, 08:18 AM
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I recently bought a 10-guage 50' cord for air compressor use.

Here is something to consider as well: Plug that heavy extension cord into the washing machine outlet in the house. It will be a dedicated circuit. Do not plug it into a wall outlet in the living room, bedroom or kitchen. Those circuits will have other loads on them such as TV's, toasters, PC's and lighting.

Most houses are NOT set up to run heavy inductive loads (compressor motors and welders) off the lighting circuits. The only places where you get a dedicated circuit back to the breaker box are washer, freezer and refrigerator circuits, normally.
 
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Old 02-28-06, 12:38 PM
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hey guys, on a related note, maybe in anticipation of next hurricane season, is it safe to run a compressor off a generator (5K)?
 
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Old 02-28-06, 05:32 PM
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Generator power for a compressor - IT DEPENDS.
I have an 8KW generator that has no problem starting and running a small 110V 4-gallon 2hp compressor used for pneumatic nailers

So. How big is your compressor? If it's just a small 2hp unit, powering it BY ITSELF should not be a problem. What else do you intend to plug in? A refrigerator perhaps? A television? Some lighting or a computer?
Better add up the loads. A refrigerator has a compressor to start.
 
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Old 02-28-06, 06:07 PM
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Tom: if all you run off the generator is the compressor, you would be ok, but add in all the other stuff, you may overload it. I remember when Ivan came through the north Georgia mountains we were without power for 3 days, and we used our 6500 Kubota off propane without a hitch, except when my mother in law's oxygen generator and the well pump came on at the same time. Wow, what a reality check.
 
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Old 02-28-06, 06:40 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler
except when my mother in law's oxygen generator and the well pump came on at the same time. Wow, what a reality check.
I'd like to hear the rest of the reality check story. What happened exactly?
 
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Old 02-28-06, 06:51 PM
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Oh, the generator went into a "I don't like this job" mode. It was really overloaded and sounded like it was ready to go airborne. Once I figured out what the loads were that were causing it, I called Lincare and had them bring some large oxygen bottles to sustain her. After that, all ran well. I divided up the circuits so we have the necessities; refrigerator, freezer, television equipment, dsl, router, laptops, etc, so we didn't really have to do without. We have a full kitchen downstairs that is gas, so we adapted, improvised and overcame.
 
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Old 03-01-06, 05:41 AM
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Originally Posted by IBM5081
Generator power for a compressor - IT DEPENDS.
I have an 8KW generator that has no problem starting and running a small 110V 4-gallon 2hp compressor used for pneumatic nailers

So. How big is your compressor? If it's just a small 2hp unit, powering it BY ITSELF should not be a problem. What else do you intend to plug in? A refrigerator perhaps? A television? Some lighting or a computer?
Better add up the loads. A refrigerator has a compressor to start.
Its a Husky 17 gal, 5 peak, 1.7 running HP.

Last season we ran the fridge, TV, pond pump, and a good amount of lights with no problems. Perhaps I could run the compressor occasionaly if I unplug the fridge?

With a bit of luck I won't need to do this, just nervous after Wilma I guess.....
 
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Old 03-02-06, 06:06 PM
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Just to add my 2 cents to these threads.

I have hooked up over 300 feet of hose (1/4" hoses, 1 100' and 4 50's all using quick connects) to my compressor to power Halloween displays/actuators and seen no pressure drop whatsoever. I wouldnt say the length is limitless, but (as Chandler noted) I think you could go 1000 or more feet with no problems. However the air volume contained in the hose itself becomes quite significant at these lengths. It can take 10 seconds or so to bleed the air out when you disconnect a pressurized hose at this length. It's almost like adding a small tank. My Grandpappy was the one who told me to always add hose, not extension cords to the compressor or your risk motor burnout from the voltage drop in the cord. But I always wondered, if my compressor has a 12 foot power cord plugged into an outlet on a 14 guage Romex circuit that is on a wiring run 100 feet from the breaker box, don't I already have a 100 foot extension on it? Isnt that the same as plugging it into a 14 guage 100 foot extension cord located next to the breaker box?

On the generator/motor thread, they always recommend 3 times the nameplate rating for motors. I.e. if the motor rating is 3 amps, use 9 amps when sizing the generator. Or, since 1 HP is (roughly) 725 watts, 2000 watts per HP you want to run...
 
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Old 03-02-06, 07:50 PM
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You are correct about the 14-guage wiring. Doesn't matter whether that wiring is in the walls or coiled up on the ground. It's still 100' of 14-guage.

The best situation is a dedicated circuit of 12-guage or better. Even if it's 12-guage but has other loads on it, that's not good either.
 
 

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