can a compressor be kepted in an unheated garage?


  #1  
Old 03-03-06, 12:45 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: ottawa
Posts: 113
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
can a compressor be kepted in an unheated garage?

the garage is insulated but at this time we are not heating it, it is attached to the house.
if we do choose to heat it we might keep the temp around 0, or just above freezing.

my question is, can we keep a compressor running in an unheated garage?

its attached to a pressure tank and needs to keep presure in there all night long.

pls advise.
 
  #2  
Old 03-03-06, 02:02 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 7 Votes on 6 Posts
Just a few clarification questions and advice. The compressor itself shouldn't suffer any ill effects as long as the oil is clean. The water residue in the tank will freeze, so it should be evacuated regularly to keep the water out of the tank. Why do you need to keep pressure on the tank all night long? If is for some emergency reason, you could always leave a light bulb close to the compressor to give some radiant heat.
 
  #3  
Old 03-03-06, 02:42 PM
IBM5081's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 655
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
May want to put a bit of automotive antifreeze in the air tank as well to reduce the chance of freezing.
 
  #4  
Old 03-04-06, 06:36 PM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,198
Received 54 Votes on 50 Posts
TinaBanana,

There is little chance you will get enough moisture in freezing weather to really need to worry about frozen lines.
You will usually only have problems during the first freeze from water that has accumulated during warmer weather.

As far as operating the compressor during cold weather what you do will depend on what type of compressor you have.
If an oil less type the motor will start fairly easily but if too cold the diaphram can wear out more quickly.
If an oil type you should warm the compressor as was suggested.
A light bulb is sometimes difficult to use because it would have to be right against the compressor to do any good and would likely burn out prematurely from the vibration of the compressor.
What I have found works best is an automotive type magnet heater that you can stick to the compressor side.
If you have an aluminum body compressor there are a few things you can do to make it stick but we'll leave it at this for now.

Any questions please ask.
 
  #5  
Old 03-08-06, 06:56 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: ottawa
Posts: 113
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the replies guys, i didnt think i had gotten any since i subscribed to the thread but got no emails.

it is an oiless compressor, its a sears compressor.

antifreeze in the tank....this is interesting, can i get more info on that. has anyone ever done that?

we work with some material that needs to be kepted under pressure for 6-10 hours. the pressure has a small slow leak so the compressor sometimes needs to kick on 2-3 times during that period to keep the pressure.

thx again for the replies
 
  #6  
Old 03-08-06, 02:21 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 7 Votes on 6 Posts
Unless you get a personal message, you probably won't know we have answered your post, so keep checking back and read the other posts. You will be amazed what you can learn from these pros.
To further Greg's post, you can use one of the engine heaters on the bottom of your tank and that should eliminate the need for antifreeze in it, but check to see if the compressor head is magnetic, or if there is a way to attach a steel plate directly to it so the heater will stick. The oilless compressor won't be adversely affected by cold with the exception of the diaphragm, and you may never have a problem.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: