cleaning tools + lead


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Old 04-21-06, 04:54 PM
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cleaning tools + lead

How would you clean a whole toolbox full of tools? And the toolbox, too.
I mean totaly strip the grease/oil off them, and out of all the cracks, then re-oil them after. I bet some of the plastic/rubber parts would get attacked by gasoline. Is there some kind of cleaner I can just dump them all in and let them soak?



The problem is, I have recently found out about some of the dangers that lead poses to kids, and because I've had a lot of lead batteries, and done lots of soldering in the house(the whole house, I might add, living room, bedroom, anywhere goes :-)), I've gone around testing things in my house just to make sure it's all safe(ish). Now I've tested some of my tools, and it looks like I've got a brush for cleaning battery terminals that's just covered in lead dust and grease in one of my toolboxes. Apparently it would be hazardous for any of my kids to handle any of my tools now, and they use them regularly for all manner of things.
I'm thinking the oil will have mixed with the lead dust, so a typical anti-lead detergent won't do it, but would it?
I have used "GUNK", but I'm looking for something that will totally remove all traces of oil, not just get gunk off for cosmetic reasons.(AKA so I can tell what the heck I am looking at.)
 
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Old 04-21-06, 06:27 PM
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I use Purple Power. It seems to clean pretty good and doesn't leave a residue. I have even taken off old rusted gas tanks, inserted a small length of chain and Purple Power, shook it around pretty good, and the inside of the tank shines like a new penny. Aside from your battery designated tools and brushes, your kids would probably have to suck on the tools (all of them) to get lead poisioning. But being safe is a good idea. The Purple Power rinses clean.
 
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Old 04-21-06, 11:54 PM
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Strip It

I'm not sure if you want to go this far but, since lead is like mercury. toxic and you keep accumulating it.
[xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]

You just spread the stuff on............................................

Just so you know, I have used their products for years and I hold around $2,000 in their stock
 

Last edited by GregH; 04-22-06 at 05:01 AM. Reason: Remove link. Advertising not permitted
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Old 04-22-06, 05:18 AM
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If you first clean the surface of the tools and tool box with hot soapy water you will take a good portion of the lead off.
By drying then soaking tools in a product like WD-40 you will penetrate crevices to clean and help lubricate.

Not sure if you are using it but there is a lead test kit available in many bulding centers.
It is used for testing for lead paint but would also check for lead on any other surface you wish to check.
 
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Old 04-22-06, 03:59 PM
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It depends on what, how much, and how bad, but I'll use dish soap and water and/or Simple Green depending upon the app.
Sometimes I'll just use WD-40 and steel wool

I like to top off tools with a layer of Boe-Shield
Depending on the tool I'll wipe it down after the Boe-Shield (leaves a WD-40 like layer) or leave it to dry (leaves a more waxy finish over the WD-40 layer)
 
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Old 04-22-06, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by wilkindw
I'm not sure if you want to go this far but, since lead is like mercury. toxic and you keep accumulating it.
[xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]

You just spread the stuff on............................................

Just so you know, I have used their products for years and I hold around $2,000 in their stock
Thanks wilkindw, is it called "strip it", or what's the stuff called? I want to get rid of as much lead as I can. I wouldn't put it past my kids to hold a wrench or screwdriver in their teeth to free a hand....(point of pride to some extent ) I know nobody's going to get "lead poisoning" per se, but I'll do the best I can within reason, less lead is better. To the moderator: What are you doing? Why did you take the name of the product off?! that's exactly what I am looking for. The post was entirely appropriate.

This brush thing was just grey with lead dust. I used the "lead check" testing swabs.
 
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Old 04-23-06, 05:25 AM
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Almost sounds like you're gonna spend more to clean them than they're worth.

Buy the kids there own tools and instruct them to not touch yours.
 
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Old 04-23-06, 05:46 AM
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yfgcrldhtn,

We have a strict no advertising policy here and when somebody says "I hold around $2,000 in their stock", you have to question their motives in recommending a product.

You might be overthinking the hazzard to your children.
With the exception of the brushes which should be discarded, the lead that is on your tools will be only a component of the dust that coats them.
Simple dish soap and a wipe down with WD-40 is more than enough to properly clean them.
Do a lead test after cleaning and you will see this to be so.
 
 

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