Pneumatic vs electric


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Old 04-23-06, 12:54 PM
J
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Pneumatic vs electric

I'm new to this site. It's time to replace my 1/2" electric drill. However, I own a good compressor and I'm trying to decide if I should buy a pneumatic drill instead. The lighter weight of the drill isn't much of an issue. I'm mainly concerned with the power differential between the two. Can anyone help?

Thanks,
Jim
 
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Old 04-23-06, 01:17 PM
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Do you intend to drag your compressor everywhere you might use your drill? That would be the limitation for me. If you are replacing a corded drill you might give serious consideration to an 18v battery operated drill driver.
 
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Old 04-23-06, 01:51 PM
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An air powered drill is only an advantage IMO if you are working in a shop environment with a constant supply of air.

I'll second the suggestion that a quality battery powered drill is a better alternative.
 
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Old 04-23-06, 01:52 PM
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Most people are opting for more convenient tools, like cordless drills. What you're proposing is less convenient, as you will not only need an electric outlet like a regular corded drill, but have to drag your compressor around as well. Something like this that stays in the shop might be ok, but buy at least an electric or a cordless drill for use anywhere else.
 
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Old 04-23-06, 05:43 PM
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Also with air driven drills, you lose alot of the ability to control speed without turning down the air supply. It is either slow, or wao, which will heat up your bits too fast. They are great for auto work, but not for woodworking applications. I would opt for a good battery power, or if you just use in the shop, a good electric to replace it.
 
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Old 04-23-06, 06:22 PM
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I didn't give you all enough information. Sorry about that. I've got a corded 3/8" drill and two cordless drills. But on occassion I need the power and the chuck size of the 1/2" drill. For example, yesterday I had to drill through the block foundation of my house to install a garden hose spigot. The 3/8" drill was not big enough to fit the size masonry bit I needed. But the 1/2" size with the power would have worked great, if the drill was not on its last legs. Now dead.

This is a drill I'd only use around the house. And I've got enough air line to reach any part of the house exterior I need to get to. No need to drag the compressor anywhere.

So my biggest question is how much torque the air drill produces versus a good electric drill. When I look at stores on line, they all show torque in a wide variety of units, from amps to pound feet, to horsepower. It's hard to compare.

Someone also mentioned the difficulty in controlling drill speed. That's good info too.

Still would like to know about the torque figures.
Thanks,
Jim
 
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Old 04-23-06, 06:45 PM
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You can't beat the versatility of an electric drill as compared to an air powered one.
For drilling a block wall a hammer drill would be the thing to have.
 
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Old 04-24-06, 06:14 AM
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Yup
jimg, it sounds like you need a 1/2" hammer drill to round out your collection
It'll get the jobs done that your present drills can't cover
 
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Old 04-26-06, 06:15 PM
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Thanks everyone.
 
 

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