Table saw motor needed

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  #1  
Old 04-27-06, 12:52 PM
Bobstat
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Table saw motor needed

I have a Craftsmann table saw, model number 137.248880. The motor is shot and I need a replacement. The motor model number is RM871, 15 Amp, 5000 RPM.

Thanks in advance for your help. Bob
 
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Old 04-27-06, 09:23 PM
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Hello Bob,

What would you like to know?
 
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Old 04-28-06, 05:48 AM
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Parts are available from Sears for that saw. Go to Sears.com and search the model # in "Parts". The parts listing does not show a complete motor, but has a breakdown for all the individual parts. I would call them and see if the complete motor is available.
 
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Old 04-28-06, 11:41 AM
Bobstat
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table saw motor needed

I went to and called Sears.com and they have the entire motor ($95 with shipping, Ouch, the entire saw runs $169) or you can purchase bushings, shafts, bearings, etc. at a reasonable price. I would like to find a used or replacement motor but could rebuild it if necessary.

Anyone know of other vendors that might sell a simular motor?

Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 04-28-06, 08:13 PM
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Belt drive or direct drive, 'stat?
 
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Old 04-29-06, 04:23 AM
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Take your old motor to a motor repair shop, they're often funky hole in the wall type places, and they'll either fix it or sell you a new (or used) equivalent for a lot less than $95. Or get the exact specs(including size) from your motor and find an industrial surplus store where used motors are a dime a dozen.

jc
 
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Old 06-11-08, 08:05 PM
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If you have a sears craftsman table saw 137.248880 and the motor burns out, most likely the armature bearing is burnt and Sears does"nt offer it. Al you need to do is purchase a Timken bearing number "P200PP" and do it yourself. I had to chisel the old one out . It costs $8.00 verses $95 for a new motor!!
 
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Old 06-12-08, 05:29 AM
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DTamm, welcome to the forums. In two years, hopefully the OP found his motor or fix. Good idea though on the bearing. Keep an eye on the dates, and you will be current with us. Hope we can help you, and you can help us on problems.
 
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Old 07-23-08, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by DTamm View Post
If you have a sears craftsman table saw 137.248880 and the motor burns out, most likely the armature bearing is burnt and Sears does"nt offer it. Al you need to do is purchase a Timken bearing number "P200PP" and do it yourself. I had to chisel the old one out . It costs $8.00 verses $95 for a new motor!!
DTamm - This is exactly what I need to fix my motor. I did a search, but I can't find that Timken bearing. Where did you find it at?
 
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Old 07-26-08, 11:52 PM
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Hi DarkCity,

You don't actually have to have a "Timken" bearing. You just need to match your bad bearing, so take it out if you can without destroying it and usually there is a number series on the side of the outer race. It may not have the name of the manufacturer, but the number series usually will indicate the manufacturer to anyone who is familiar with them. You can take the number and cross reference it to whatever manufacturer (bearing) is available. Either a motor shop or a bearing shop can help you with this, they'll have parts books for bearings with numbers for equivalent bearings from the different manufacturers.

The other way is would be to measure the bearing, the diameter of the outer race, the diameter of the center hole, the thickness, see what kind of bearing it is (ball bearing or roller bearing, etc) and find a vendor of bearings. www.grainger.com is a good starting point, they have warehouses all around the country.

jc
 
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Old 07-27-08, 12:27 PM
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Grainger is a good source; only problem is that they are STRICTLY a wholesaler. They will verify that you are a business before they will ship you a part. I managed to get replacement bearings for my pool pump motor, but only by signing up with my business. They will not sell to retail individuals.
 
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Old 07-27-08, 06:09 PM
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Sorry, I didn't think about that Grainger requirement. I guess I always owned a business when I went to one. But I don't remember them being very strict about that rule. I just looked at the registration page on their web site there are no real requirements unless you want to avoid paying sales tax (then you need a resale certificate). It looks to me that you could have a part time lemonade business on the front lawn and you could still qualify to purchase there.
 
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Old 07-27-08, 06:16 PM
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I just called Grainger and confirmed that any business, any size, any kind, will qualify you to purchase from them. Also, if you don't have a business, they have something called an "accomodation account" that allows you to purchase anything shown in their catalog at the catalog price. So they've made it real easy...
 
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Old 07-28-08, 05:17 AM
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Must have discovered all the $$$ they were losing.

I took a quick browse and didn't see that on the website, so it must be an insider work-around that you would have to know. On the registration page the "Full company name" is a required block.
 
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Old 08-01-08, 11:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Bobstat View Post
I have a Craftsmann table saw, model number 137.248880. The motor is shot and I need a replacement. The motor model number is RM871, 15 Amp, 5000 RPM.

Thanks in advance for your help. Bob
Hello, what do you need for help? A used motor OK?
 
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Old 07-24-09, 01:42 PM
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rm871 rear bearing for armature assembly, part number help

Hi, I cannot locate a cross reference for the Timken P200PP mentioned in this thread. The rear bearing on my rm871 armature assembly needs to be replaced but I can't see the number on the side of the bearing. It is too worn out to read. Does anyone have the bearing number and/or a store where I can purchase this bearing? Also, how do I remove it? It's really stuck on the shaft. I'm afraid to chisel it out because I'll probably damage the surrounding parts. Will a bearing splitter work?

Thanks!
 
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Old 07-24-09, 01:59 PM
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Is this how to read P200PP?

From the web site, Timken® Products Catalog, I downloaded the ballbearings.pdf file. The code for P200PP looks to mean:

P = loose fit
200 = single row, light
PP = two seals

Is that correct? It doesn't mention outside and inside bore diameters. Does anyone know what those are? I dont' think I have the proper tools to accurately measure this. Is it metric or in inches for the rm871 bearing?

Thanks again.
 
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Old 07-24-09, 04:26 PM
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Hmm,

It seems this very old thread is attracting a lot of traffic with folks having the same problem with their Craftsman table saw motor.

That Timken number relates to a bearing type and not a specific model.
To match that bearing you would need to locate the number, either on the bearing cover or on the side of the outer ring. (Often need a magnifying glass and a flashlight.)
If there is no number you would need a good caliper to measure the shaft diameter, outer race diameter and thickness.
You should be able to find a caliper that would work at an import tool store for under twenty bucks.

If is a 5/8" shaft many actually use a metric bearing number 6203 and if a rubber seal will be a 6203RS.
6203 refers to the size, the rest is window dressing.
You should be able to get the size of that number online, it is one of the most common small bearings out there.

A bearing splitter sounds like it would be a great tool but for some reason what is commonly called a bearing splitter is actually a backing plate that "splits" apart and fits in behind a bearing so a puller has something to grab on to.

Removing bearings is as much an art as anything and requires some creative thinking and tools.
In many cases they are just not removable without damage and this is mostly found on disposable assemblies.

If you were able to provide a clear close up picture we may be able to offer something more specific.
You can post pictures on a free host like Photo Bucket and provide a link.
 
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Old 07-24-09, 05:39 PM
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Another way to remove a frozen bearing is to use a high speed grinder (or even a die grinder) with a grinding tip or a cutting disk. You could also buy a cutting disk adapter that will work with a regular drill. I've bought them (and 2" or 3" cutting disks) at Home Depot and used them to cut off padlocks. Bearing metal is real tough, I've actually only used a die grinder on a frozen bearing, but it's worth trying a cutting disk if you have a drill, it won't cost much and it's easier to control than a grinding tip. When you get to the inner bearing race, grind almost all the way through and then use a chisel to knock off the race. If it's melted onto the shaft you'll have to smooth/sand the shaft so the new bearing will fit well.
 
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Old 08-05-09, 01:29 PM
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Rear Bearing for RM871 Found: Enduro 6200 z c3

I took my old bearing to ABI Industries in Oakland, CA. They found a replacemnt bearing: Enduro 6200 z c3. I believe they measured the old bearing at 10mm inside dia, 30mm outside diam, 9mm wide. It cost me $1.50 for the replacement.

I purchased a bearing puller on ebay for $25 so I still think I came out ahead. Sure beats buying a new motor when the old one is still usable.

Beer 4U2
 
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Old 08-06-09, 01:09 PM
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Sorry, the part number is Enduro 6200 zz c3. It took me less than 15 minutes to tap in the new bearing and slap the motor back together and remount. I powered it up and it seems to be running fine.
 
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Old 09-01-09, 07:03 PM
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got the bearing - now what

So I have the same problem everyone else did here. I have a 6200zz bearing ordered, have the old bearing off, but have never done this before. Any tips for getting the new bearing on the armature assembly? Thanks.
 
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Old 09-02-09, 05:09 PM
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Here are some general suggestions for installing the bearing since I don't know what this motor looks like.

If you have to install the bearing onto a shaft, find a short hollow pipe that's just a little larger than the shaft and will fit over it, put the bearing on the shaft (first make sure the shaft is smooth) as far as you can by hand...and then use the pipe as a drift, tapping it with a hammer. The important thing is to be pushing the pipe/drift on the inner bearing land (ring), not the outer one. If you have a pipe that's a good fit then you can tap the bearing straight down. Expect some resistance, but some medium hammer blows should do it. You shouldn't have to hit it as hard as you can, or use a giant sledge hammer. If your pipe/drift is larger than the inner bearing land(ring), then rest an edge(of the pipe) on part of the inner bearing land and tap once, then move the pipe edge around the circle of the inner bearing land tapping as you go. You don't want to c...k the bearing so try many light taps, always moving around the circle. If you don't have a pipe, use a drift or a punch, but it's just that much harder to keep the bearing from cocking.

If the bearing goes into a round slot matching the outer bearing land (ring)...and the shaft comes later...you can fit the old bearing on top of the new bearing and tap on the old bearing to push the new bearing down into the round slot. This time you can emphasize tapping on the outer bearing land (ring) since that's where the interference is.

Sorry about the "c...k" but this silly forum won't let me use the four letter word "c..k" even though it's a regular word used in the English language. To all the perverts reading this, sorry about that, you'll have to find your trills elsewhere. Try the washing machine forums.
 
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Old 09-03-09, 10:58 AM
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installed and ready to go

Thanks JBCLEM. I got the bearing on with no problems. As an FYI to anyone reading this forum, I ordered my bearing from drillspot.com. It just came via UPS today and I ordered it on Tuesday night (2 days ago!). Funny thing is that the package came and when I looked over the packing slip, it came from a company several have mentioned here - Grainger. So...if you do not own a business and cannot register as a buyer at Grainger.com, just order from drillspot.com because Grainger must handle that website.

Thanks for all the help. I just saved $65 buying the bearing versus a new armature assembly from Sears.

Now I just have to put the motor back together and put it back in the table saw (fingers crossed).
 
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Old 09-23-09, 08:48 PM
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The information in this thread was right on. I ordered the bearing on faith from Drillspot.com and had it in 2 days. My rear motor bearing was seized and would not pull off the shaft even with a bearing puller. I had to grind it off. The new bearing required only light tapping to get on the shaft. Table saw works like new. Sears must have bought a lot of motors with bad bearings.
 
  #26  
Old 12-01-09, 11:00 PM
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Thumbs up Another successful bearing change

Hello all...

Interesting thread, and it's nice to see I'm not alone. My saw (Tradesman BT2502W with RM871 motor) died last night because the rear bearing seized. Today I found a local bearing supply that had both front and rear bearings in stock for about $5 each. They pointed me to the welding shop across the street where I was able to have the old bearings pulled and new ones pressed on; I gave the guy $5 (the high end of his suggested fee). Now the motor is reassembled, reinstalled, and singing!

The bearings I purchased were ORS (a Turkish company), and were sealed, not just shielded. The part numbers were 62002RS and 62012RS.

Cheers!
 

Last edited by the_tow_guy; 02-08-10 at 08:53 AM.
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Old 12-25-09, 08:32 PM
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Replacing Bearings

Heres the deal on bearings. Always always buy domestic equivalent bearing. Avoid Chinese bearings like the plague. If you can't read the number just give the bearing house the OD, ID, width & number of seals on your failed bearing. You always want a dual sealed bearing or a sealed for life bearing. If you can't get the bearing off, the OD of the shaft will work for the ID of the bearing. Dake makes a great manual press for removing bearings. Quite useful for other projects as well. Do not buy shielded bearings. They are like a screen door in a submarine. "Sealed" bearing are usually rubber, neoprene or silicone and will keep contaminates out and prevent lock ups. Shielded bearing have a metal shield on both sides and are liken to a leaky faucet in reverse in other words allowing contaminates into the bearing. Its always a good idea to use an air compressor if you have one to blow all the saw dust out of the motors anyway when done with a project. Its just a good practice to lengthen the life of any power tool motor. Just be sure to bleed off the water from the tank that accumulates first. If you don't have a compressor a can of compressed air works too or use the blower setting on your shop vac. Just allow a few seconds in the blower position to remove contaminates from the hose. Some of the bad press about the Bosch 4100-9 is due to the bearing failing on the fan end of the motor. The fan pulls air in to keep the motor cool. It not only pull in air but contaminates. They still use shielded bearings. One retailer in Omaha replaces the shielded bearings on their new saws because they know they will fail eventually. Haven't gotten my Bosch but will do so in the spring. I have looked for reviews or even some place that stocks the Makita 2705X1 but they are scarce as hens teeth. The Bosch offers other nice features like the TS1002 & TS1003. Rear out feed table & left side extension. Hope this is helpful. An once of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
 
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Old 02-07-10, 08:08 PM
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Thanks for everyones postings. My saw puked out this weekend and I was very close to bidding on a replacement motor on e-bay this morning. I stumbled on to your sight by luck and not having a lot of experience with motors or repairing anything myself . . . I'm pretty confident that once the bearing arrives, I shouldn't have a problem putting it in. If I do, I'll be back! It is good to know that there is resource like this available. Kudos to all of you willing to share! Thanks again!
 
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Old 06-24-10, 08:41 AM
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Craftsman Table Saw 137.248880

Thanks guys.. I know this is an old thread.. but good information.. I picked up my bearing from Purvis Bearing Industries.. Part number 6200 2RSJEM SKF (Brand) about $10. I purchased the 2RS bearing.. (2 Rubber sealed bearing.. instead of the shielded bearing...) This only the outside bearing.. (Bearing at the brush end of the motor.)
This is an easy job, but getting the old bearing off the shaft is fun.. I didn't have my bearing spliter, so I ended up cutting the bearing with a die grinder, and spliting it with a chisel..
Only hint.. is to mark the inner shield around the fan portion of the motor.. (if installed incorrectly it will cover the passageway for the fan.)
Thanks again,
Bryan
 
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Old 05-05-11, 10:56 AM
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Bad armature want to fix the cheepest way possible.

Hey, I have the same sutuation Model 137.218010 Serial RHV15 is the table saw numbers the motor Model number is Model RM872 and its a craftsman as well 10" table saw. I did have the motor tested and they say is the armature bad would need to get it rewond. Will this method work for what I have
 
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Old 05-06-11, 08:40 PM
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I have a sears craftsman table saw (137-248100) with motor RM871. Am I mistaking or isn't the Bearing/Bushing needed a #8 87840081 oQRO?
 
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Old 05-07-11, 07:13 AM
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Got my motor torn apart. Number on brg. is 62004, don't know brand. Local auto store has brg. and the number is 200cc like for $4.50 or a BCA 200cc for $14.00. My measurements were 9.95 mm or .3915 in. inside. Outside was 29.96 mm or 1.1795 in.. And the width was 9.0 mm or .3540 in..
 
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Old 05-09-11, 07:00 PM
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Got motor put back together. Must of had a piece of the bearing shield caught in the winding some where. Burnt winding and armature. Bought new table saw at Sears for $169. They wanted $140 for new motor for old saw.
 
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Old 08-24-11, 03:51 PM
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My kingdom (table saw) for a horse (bearing).

Craftsman table saw and RM871 motor.
I thought my motor had burned out, so I started looking at new table saws. I couldn't believe how cheap they are. The table extending clamps are cheap plastic, and the saw blade up/down, slant mechanism looks really chintzy. I figured the table saw I have now is of better quality than the new ones.

I started researching the RM871 motor and found this forum. I than realized that my problem might just be a bearing.

I got a Nachi-Fujikoshi sealed bearing (6200-2NE/RS/2RS) from E-bay for 6 bucks. I went to a local electric shop and payed $15 ($10 plus $5 tip) to pull the old bearing and install the new. When you pull the motor apart, use the blowups in the owner's manual, or take pictures with a digital camera to insure correct reassembly. Digital pictures of the on/off switch wiring and reset switch wiring also helps.

My table saw is now running like it used to, and I am out only $21.

I know this is an old thread, but please keep it open. I'm sure there are lots of RM871 motors ready to destroy their bearings.
 
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Old 08-24-11, 07:31 PM
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The brg was bad. I could have replaced it but the armature had melted some. JUNK
 
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Old 09-20-11, 04:26 PM
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Craftsman 10" table saw

On the RM 871 motor, I've got a new bearing on the brush end OK, but the rubber mounting (basically a cup formed piece of rubber) is unusable. It seems specific to this unit. I would welcome any source, even a scrap unit where the windings, armature, or bearings are shot, but the mounting is OK. Thanks.
 
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Old 09-23-11, 09:26 PM
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got bearing from dillspot

Had same bearing problem. Got it through drillspot / grainger. arrived in 1 day.
using dremel to cutoff old bearing. tapped new one on using wood block and hammer. Saw works fine. Thanks everyone for advice and for keeping thread open
 
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Old 09-24-11, 11:05 AM
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To follow up on the RM871 motor bearing problem, Sears has parts for the RM872, including the brush end rubber bushing ("mounting" in my initial post). I ordered the 872 bushing and it fits the 871. Saw is running fine. Thanks for comments.
 
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Old 10-09-11, 05:04 PM
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Craftsman 10" table saw electric motor needed

I need to purchase a new or used electric motor model 113.12172 or the newer motor 113.12202 115 volt, single phase. 1 or more HP.

If necessary I could modify a motor so that it would fit physically. Let me hear from ya.

Thanx
 
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Old 10-09-11, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by rickluc View Post
Got motor put back together. Must of had a piece of the bearing shield caught in the winding some where. Burnt winding and armature. Bought new table saw at Sears for $169. They wanted $140 for new motor for old saw.
I bought the same? table saw on sale for $100 from Sears.
 
 

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