Can a compressor be used as a DE-compressor

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Old 07-24-06, 06:58 PM
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Can a compressor be used as a DE-compressor

Is it possible to use an air compressor to suck air out of something? I have a couple of inflatable kid pools that need to be deflated occasionally. They each have multiple chambers and it takes forever to squeeze the air out.

Can an air compressor be used to deflate them?

The compressor sucks air in from somewhere, is it a place a fitting can be used? cant a fitting be attached to it so it pulls from a concentrated line?
 
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Old 07-24-06, 08:02 PM
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When I worked for the Airlines, the guys in the shop made me a small bagged vacuum out of stainless tubing. Without the bag it would do what you wanted. The straight 1" tube has a bag attached to the back with a worm gear clamp. They fitted a 1/4" line, bending it in a loop to within 6" of the front pointed backwards, cutting a hole and welding it to the 1" pipe and welding a male compressor fitting on the other end. Difficult to describe in words, but it creates a vacuum from the pressure side of the compressor and would suck out the air.
 
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Old 07-24-06, 08:23 PM
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Have you tried a shop-vac?
 
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Old 07-24-06, 08:34 PM
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I see what you are saying.

Its similar to how my pool vacuum works. The water connects to the end of the vacuum and so does a bag. The water flows through the hose, across the vauum head and into the bag - bringing with it water from behind.

In my case, I guess the top of the 1' tube would be open, the bottom would have a fitting that fit into the inflatable toy, and the fitting for the air flow would be in-line, pointed to the top (open end).

I can probably use copper with some Ys and put something like that together.

Is it possible, though, to connect a hose to where the air compressor takes air IN? Seems more direct that way.
 
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Old 07-24-06, 09:07 PM
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No, that area is a filtered space, and the air must remain cool to keep it from overheating. The shop vac thing is also a good idea.
 
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Old 07-24-06, 10:24 PM
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A small shopvac would be ideal. An actual vacuum pump would not, due to the volume of air being removed. You're not actually trying to establish a vacuum, just remove the air.
The design would work better if it included a small tube to insert in the valve to open the flap on the inside that works to keep air from escaping.
 
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Old 07-25-06, 07:57 AM
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shop vac seems perfect. Im sure I can find the fittings to reduce the hose down to a thin tube size (1/4) and then come up with something that can be inserted to keep the flap open.

Any ideas?
 
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Old 07-25-06, 10:52 AM
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We have a small elecrtic pump for a king size camping air matress...Look in the camping section of a store that sells camping supplies.

This works great for filling and removing the air.
 
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Old 07-25-06, 02:20 PM
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Thats no fun.

The site is doityourself.com

not BUYityourself.com
 
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Old 07-25-06, 06:59 PM
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For the nozzle, consider PVC, clear plastic tubing and solvent glue (for the PVC) as well as clear all-purpose adhesive (for the plastic tubing).

Start with the tubing and successively build to a coupling that the shopvac hose will fit into. The whole thing may end up being 6-8" long depending on how rapidly the diameter grows and the length of each section.
 
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