what type of air framing nailer do you reccomend

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  #1  
Old 07-28-06, 02:16 PM
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what type of air framing nailer do you reccomend

I am in the market for my first framing gun. I just basically tinker around home, building sheds, decks, adding on to the garage and some shelving stuff I got a new Compressor for fathers day and thought it woudl be nice to buy a nailer I notice that there is 21, 28, 31, 35 degree guns, clipped head, round head and I am sure there is others. What is a good all around air framing naielr for the home owner? I also see the Central Pneumatic makes a 6 n 1, does 21, 28, and 35 with both clipped and full head


thanks
 
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Old 08-01-06, 05:40 AM
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ronrippey,

I recently bought a framing nailer and was faced with the same questions as yours.
I considered an inexpensive import but eliminated that when the store that sold them admitted they did not stock any repair parts.
The choice of which brand name to choose was fairly simple.
I had some choice in brand selection in my rural area but found that the local preference was Bostitch with every dealer in my area stocking nails and even a few simple repair parts.
The clipped head model that I bought is working out very well. It is super light and hasn't once malfunctioned in the several boxes of nails I have already put through it.
Check out what is common in your area and then search for reviews of whatever looks good to you.

Yours is a failry common question.
Here is a link to other posts on the subject.

Let us know what you eventually get.
 
  #3  
Old 08-01-06, 04:48 PM
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There are three basic collation angles - 20, 28 and 31 (or a few degrees either side of those figures). Find out which nails are available. You are looking for a stick nailer rather than a coil nailer.

Nails come plastic-collated, wire-collated and paper-collated. If you go with paper collation, always unload the nailer after a day's use. Otherwise jams are likely due to magazine spring pressure over time. Plastic collation will tend to throw plastic chips around, maybe into your face.

Now look at the brand-name nailers that will drive those nails. Consider refurbished nailers and Ebay which also can provide bargains. Get something that you can get parts for. Otherwise you will have to throw it away when it breaks.

Ask a local framing contractor which brand of nailers he buys and uses. That should tell you something.
 
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Old 08-01-06, 05:38 PM
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As the others said, look for a name brand. If it breaks, you want to be able to fix it. Look through the Recon section of the big boxes, or refurbished ones, or even pawn shops. Get one that shoots wire collation to keep down on flying objects in your face. Make sure you have the option of changing triggers from the contact trigger to an impulse trigger. It impresses people to see you shoot 10 nails into the first 3" of a 2x4 in 3 seconds, but just like going to the firing range, it is expensive.
Unless you are doing framing in Florida, you can get by with a clipped head nailer. I have never had a nail fail with a pulled head, so the round head hype is just that (IMO).
Now, go shopping!! And if you have any money left over, look at the finish nailers and brad nailers, and staplers....OK, I'm outta here.
 
  #5  
Old 08-02-06, 06:41 AM
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Triggers - I recommend either a single-shot or a convertible set for single shot mode. Just because you are comfortable bounce-firing the nailer does not mean anyone else on the job knows how to do it correctly. For most jobs, you don't have time to teach them how.
If you are the ONLY person on the site who will be using the nailer, then leave the contact-trip trigger in place.
 
  #6  
Old 08-02-06, 10:41 AM
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There is abundant discussion on this topic:

Google for "framing nailer" and wait for the search results to appear. Switch over from Web to Groups and you will see all of the newsgroup discussion threads on framing nailers. Happy reading.
 
  #7  
Old 08-02-06, 12:03 PM
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thanks

I took all of the advice and purchased a Botisch refurbished I built a new shed and took about 1/2 the time of manually nailing or screwing it togehter I can use it where it shots real fast, or you have to pull the trigger. I pull the trigger! It took a little bit of getting used to it and I had to adjust the air pressure in order to get the right depth. Thanks again for the advice
 
  #8  
Old 08-02-06, 01:39 PM
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Some nailers come with adjustable depth control, so you just set the compressor between 90-120 psi and every nail is uniformly driven. Others are set to toenail by default (drive as deep as possible) for framing. Good for you finding the refurb of a name brand.
 
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