Front end loader


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Old 10-11-06, 06:07 PM
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Front end loader

Hi, Don,t know if this is the right place for this question,but it is a power tool. I have a loader on my garden tractor and have replaced all of the hydraulic lines. Can any one tell me how i go about bleeding the air out? Thanks, Don
 
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Old 10-11-06, 06:30 PM
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Operating the lift up and down should purge the air.

I have a manure bucket on the front of my tractor with one way hydraulics. I've replaced the lines one at a time [as needed] but don't ever remember any problems with air bubbles.
 
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Old 10-11-06, 07:13 PM
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Marksr is correct. All you should have to do is cycle the cylinders through their entire travel a couple times.

Are you having a problem?
 
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Old 10-12-06, 03:50 AM
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Keep the resevoir full while you are going through these cycles, or you will suck more air should it fall below the pick up. Not sure how large a resevoir you have, but for the most part they are relatively small. If you have a check dip stick it will only read accurately with all the hydraulics at rest.
 
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Old 10-12-06, 05:25 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler
If you have a check dip stick it will only read accurately with all the hydraulics at rest.

I don't know about garden tractors but it has always been my understanding that you check the hydraulic fluid level with all lifts fully extended
 
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Old 10-12-06, 04:25 PM
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I'll throw in my .02 CDN by saying that most hydraulic machinery uses two way cylinders where the volume of oil in the cylinders would be constant regardless of their position.
The only exception would be if you had a bucket that used gravity to lower and power to raise but I have never seen one.
 
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Old 10-12-06, 05:46 PM
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Marksr: you are right, I may have used the term incorrectly. By saying "at rest", I was referring to being extended. All mine are extended when they reach the ground, and I was using that as a criteria. I believe Greg is correct on double cylinders, too, in that they are never "at rest", as one is always extended and one is sucked up.
 
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Old 10-12-06, 07:22 PM
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Not trying to start an argument,but all the heavy eqpt I've worked w/ for a lot of years always had the hyd oil checked w/ engine stopped and all attachments on the ground.
As for volume of oil in cyl being constant,the diameter and length of the rod inside the cyl on a double action cyl makes a difference between fully extended and fully retracted in regard to how much oil is in the hyd tank.
JMHO,
Mike
 
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Old 10-13-06, 05:44 AM
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Originally Posted by GregH
The only exception would be if you had a bucket that used gravity to lower and power to raise but I have never seen one.

Maybe you are too young My tractor [53 ford] like all the old tractors raises the lifts hydraulicly and lowers them with gravity. I don't know about the newer tractors. I woud prefer to have a tractor with 2 way hydraulics and 4x4 but then that prices me out of a tractor
 
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Old 10-14-06, 05:57 PM
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This whole thread brings to mind a situation when I was working.. The oiler had filled the tank on a 90 ton press when the ram was down..
The plant manager and a supervisor in our Tool and Die building were inspecting the press, and asked the operator to start it up and cycle it..
Well, when the ram lifted, the excess oil blew out of the fill port on the tank, created a high pressure stream that went straight up to the roof, and rained down for 50 ft in all directions..
The plant manager and supervisor called it a day, and went home..
 
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Old 10-15-06, 06:48 AM
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Marksr: got me by two years. Mine is a '55 640, but it does what I want it to, and like you, I sure can't afford to even look at the new stuff. On my cattle farm, I used a '42 9n. Talk about tricky, clutch driven hydraulics, right brake on right side, left on left. No brakes, it is a wonder it didn't get me killed.
 
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Old 10-15-06, 11:26 AM
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Chandler

I always thought that the best brake on my jubilee is the 6' scraper blade Of course there are other implements that help to stop if the ground isn't too hard

Besides tractor brakes are only for turning, aren't they?
 
 

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