Corded Drill

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Old 10-30-06, 10:08 PM
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Corded Drill

Hi:
Before coming winter, we, the family needs a good working Drill on semi-heavy outdoor projects.

The Cordless Drill we used indoor project is not impressive, this time in regard to 'power.' Then, we purchased a corded Black & Decker 3/8 drill at a local hardware store. This drill certainly giving us a better result, however it still does not give an enough power on semi-heavy-duty lumber project.

Wonder which/what brand of Drill is good for semi-heavy outdoor-projects?

Thanks for your help in advance.
 
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Old 10-31-06, 04:37 AM
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Cordless drills do not yet match corded drills for power, but they are getting close. But you will have to lay out some $$$$. B&D basically are toys, you need at least an 18V drill which will likely be a contractor grade tool(Porter-Cable, Dewalt, Hilti, Metabo, etc.). Look at the newer lithium-ion battery tools, they have more power and less weight than the same nicad bat.
 
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Old 10-31-06, 04:52 AM
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For a corded drill, look for handle configuration, variable speed, reversibility, 1/2" keyless chuck. By getting a 1/2" chuck, you will almost automatically be getting a beefier drill with a greater power output. I have a Hilti with all the above attributes, except the handle is angled backwards away from the chuck, and it gets very tiring drilling for a long period of time.
Another thing to consider is speed versus torque, and the job you intend to do with it. I also have a low rpm, high torque drill for doing the heavier work, like drilling tough woods. Be aware, however, they will pick you up off the floor or break your wrist if you don't maintain good control. It rarely stalls.
Cordless drills are getting better each day, but I have found for everyday use, going above 14.4 volts makes the drill a little heavier and unwieldy. I use a belt hook when I am using mine, and found the 18, 19.2, 24 and 32 volt drills are a little too large to be comfortable hanging all day, and the 14.4 is a good, average drill size, for daily work.
Good luck with your choices, now go shopping!!
 
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Old 10-31-06, 06:51 AM
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It is also a good idea to look at the amps on any electrical tool, usually the higher the amps the stronger the motor.
 
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Old 10-31-06, 09:23 AM
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Question

Hi:
Thanks for the quick responses. I truly appreciate the knowledgeable and helpful imputs.

Seeing the problem with the drill, my elder sister's husband let us borrow his Drill which is quite old as saying he bought it in his early '30. However, we got to like this drill, except 'more' power, if possible. Our projects are in mid. to semi-heavy, mostly Garden and light-duty fence around the house.

A name of the Drill is follow;
Skill 6355
120 V 50-60 Hz 4.0 A
1/2 (13 mm)

How am I able to find a similar to a bit more 'power' drill?
In both stores, Home Depot and Lowe's, there is NO drill comparable to his Drill. Where should I go to find a similar Drill, above?

Thanks again, ...
 
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Old 10-31-06, 02:28 PM
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Go to your choice of home center (Home Depot, Lowe's, etc.).

You are looking for a 1/2" chuck drill rather than a 3/8" chuck drill.
I recommend a keyed chuck rather than a keyless, since you don't want it to slip.

There are several brands (Milwaukee, DeWalt, Hitachi, etc.) that offer these drills. Typically they will be rated at 7-8 amps power and 800-900 rpm. They will all be fairly heavy due to the gearbox and chuck size. If they come with a side handle, that's a plus.
Pick the one that fits your hand well. If the bit hangs up, expect some reaction torque coming back at you. That's the reason for the side handle.
 
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Old 10-31-06, 02:33 PM
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These half-inch drills will weigh about 5-6 pounds and cost over $100 new. Your grandchildren will still be using it after you and I are long gone.
 
 

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