So which is the best Pancake Compressor/Nailer Combo??


  #1  
Old 11-27-06, 02:09 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
So which is the best Pancake Compressor/Nailer Combo??

Ok, I'm in the market for an electric 5 or 6 gallon pancake compressor/nailer combo package like they carry at Lowe's, Home Depot, etc... Of course they each seem to carry different "combo" packages. Home Depot seems to push the Porter Cable/3 gun package with the 2 sizes of brad nailer's & stapler, all for like $299, Lowes is pushing the equivalent Bostich package. DeWalt seems to have similar packages at about the same price in both stores, Hitachi has one, Rigid, etc...... I'm doing alot of renovations here at home & am tired of hand-nailing moldings & trim.

So what's the best package? any features I should look for that one package may have but another doesn't? Any bad experiences with any of them, reliability issues, breakage, etc???

Also, if I buy one of these packages, can I eventually use a larger framing nailer or gun with these compressor's (like for building decks or something like that) or do I need to move up to higher horsepower/bigger tank style compressors to accomplish this? Would I be better off getting a larger Cambell/Hausfield or Craftsman tank/horsepower unit to begin with & buy the guns separately? (I'm being tempted by the 3 free guns & other accessories you get with the "package deals")

Any feedback would be most appreciated... Thanks folks!
 
  #2  
Old 12-15-06, 04:10 AM
I
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 61
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The compressors will run any size nail gun. The cheap ones aren't meant for contractors with continuous use, but you'll probably not have a problem as a DIY'er.

I actually have a cheap 2 gallon "hotdog" compressor that works fine for all my nail guns - including a framing nailer. It's pretty noisy, but I've never had a problem nailing with it.

I can't recommend any specific models, but I've seen the same ones. I also noticed that our local Menard's seemed to have some similar models at better prices than the other stores.

Make sure you don't compare the horsepower ratings - they all rate them differently - look at the CFM delivery at a specific PSI - use the higher PSI number for comparison - for example it might say 4.5 CFM at 40 psi and 3.0 CFM at 90 psi. You'll be using it at the 90 psi level - so make your comparison there.

I'd also consider how difficult it is to lug the thing around. You have to carry it to wherever you're going to use it, and those cheap packages don't have much hose with them. Good luck. After you've used a nail gun for awhile you'll wonder how you ever got along without it.
 
  #3  
Old 12-15-06, 06:33 AM
G
gsr
gsr is offline
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: SE Minnesota
Posts: 170
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Nailers...

I've got the Porter Cable 3 gun combo from HD and my dad has a Craftsman 2 gun combo. Both seem to work the same and came with a air hose that will reach all around the room 25'(?). Can't tell you wich is better or which will last longer but they both have worked without trouble for us on DIY projects such as building end tables, installing baseboard, crown molding, etc.
 
  #4  
Old 12-15-06, 07:36 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,630
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
I have the Porter-Cable kit and the guns are fine, but the compressor was so loud I couldn't stand it, so I sold it. My boss has the Bostich kit and the compressor is a little smaller (and easier to carry), though it's still enough to run a framing nailer, but makes a lot less noise.
 
  #5  
Old 12-15-06, 07:42 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,769
Received 32 Votes on 29 Posts
Compressor

I have the Porter Cable with 16 and 18 gauge nailers. It works fine. No problems with operation. I would advise that you buy extra hose so you can place the compressor well away from the work area, as it is very noisy.

I also use a Paslode cordless 16 gauge nailer for trim work. No hose or compressor needed.
 
  #6  
Old 12-15-06, 03:31 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
The three gun PC deal was on this past weekend at the orange big box for $259. Not a bad deal. I do agree that this type compressor is awfully loud, but I always leave mine outside and run the hoses to the point of use. Having any compressor inside makes for a deafening situation.
 
  #7  
Old 12-16-06, 05:41 AM
IBM5081's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 655
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Most of the pancake-type compressors are oil-free which makes them a bit louder but no problem if they sit tilted at an angle.
I have the twin-tank style unit that is oil-lubricated. It's not QUITE as loud, but it's still fairly noisy when it runs. I have found that both pancakes and twin-tanks weigh about the same (50-60 pounds) and have a similar foot print.

The main item is to get a 2 h.p. motor on the unit so that the recovery time will be shorter once the compressor starts. That factor will hardly be an issue with brad nailers, finish nailers and narrow guage staplers. When using a framing nailer or coil nailer, the period of reduced pressure can leave fasteners standing tall when bounce firing into tough lumber.
 
  #8  
Old 12-19-06, 10:34 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Las Cruces, NM -Zone 8
Posts: 289
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sorry to hijack here but when you talk of recovery time for the smaller nailers - brads, pins, staple type - would one be able to fill a 5 gal air tank for basic, quick use like 2 or 3 pieces of baseboard or door casings?
 
  #9  
Old 12-20-06, 03:32 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
I keep a tall (probably 3 gallon) CO2 tank filled with compressed air for just that purpose. I can get a dozen hits off it with a finish nailer. Just right for a small repair job. Since it has a female connector on the tank, and the hose from my compressor has a female on the end, I made up a male to male hose about a foot long to transfer air between the two. Just make sure you turn the valve off on the aux tank prior to unhooking it, and make your disconnect from the compressor side.
 
  #10  
Old 12-20-06, 05:21 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Las Cruces, NM -Zone 8
Posts: 289
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks chandler - just what I hoped. A few hits here and there without a long tether to a noisy compressor would be just right.
 
  #11  
Old 12-21-06, 03:41 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Just one more thing I forgot, the tank has an overpressure valve on it, too. I have seen where people have converted freon tanks to air tanks without an overpressure valve, and that is not acceptable, especially when you are filling from a compressor.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: