Question regarding saws

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-11-07, 03:21 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2001
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question regarding saws

I'm getting ramped up for this spring to remove and rebuild a new deck onto my house and my wife wants to get me a new saw as a gift for use on the deck , but i'm not sure what saw i should get that i would get the most use out of during the building of the deck and for future projects that might come up in the future.

Would you suggest a table saw , or a mitre/chop saw??

I can see the use for both on the deck in varying degrees , but was wondering what you "pros" would suggest.

Thanks Gord
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-11-07, 04:57 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,424
Received 156 Votes on 138 Posts
I"d start with a good circular saw if you don't already have one.

You would get more use out of a mitre saw building the deck although a table saw would be handy if you plan to rip your own balasters out of 2x4s. If both are not a possibility, figure out what your future projects and needs will be.
 
  #3  
Old 01-11-07, 06:36 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2001
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
already have a circ saw , and a ricipricating (sp) saw ,, i was leaning towards the mitre saw , but there are a few projects in the future that i could use the table saw for as well , but they won't be until late in the year or off into early spring of 08 ,,
 
  #4  
Old 01-11-07, 07:48 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,393
Received 59 Votes on 55 Posts
Generically speaking, the table saw is probably the best choice for your next saw. However, it's best to look down the road and see what projects are on the horizon and buy whatever's going to work best for them.
 
  #5  
Old 01-20-07, 02:01 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,210
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
A tablesaw is more versatile than a mitre saw.

For deck building, even a well coordinated crew w/ mitresaw can't beat a few guys working efficiently with skillsaws. Rarely is a mitresaw worthwhile for the lone worker.

When you grow so familiar with your skillsaw you're looking for excuses to plunge-cut a mortise, the clunky mitresaw will seem a waste of garage space.

Another saw to consider, especially for rough construction joinery, is a *set* of *quality* handsaws, toothed for softwood. A straight blade can do things no circular blade can, and it's most expedient with small stuff anyway. A *set* because you'll want both crosscut and rip tooth configurations. Ripping with a combo is torture when you know better. I think a lot of people have bad experiences using inappropriate or dull old saws and conclude power is the only way to go. I like the Japanese (pull-cut) type, personally.
 
  #6  
Old 01-20-07, 06:05 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,424
Received 156 Votes on 138 Posts
I agree that you need a few good hand saws but given a choice I prefer to never use mine
 
  #7  
Old 01-20-07, 08:24 AM
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,188
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
For building a deck neither saw is a must. IMO a good circular saw is all you need. A crosscut saw is nice for finishing cutouts in stair stringers although a reciprocating saw will do. I have a hand rip saw that I inherited. It hasn't been used in years. I just can't see ripping manually when there are so many neat power tools available.

However, if there are more projects in your future you can use the deck as an excuse to justify buying a miter saw. I don't see much use for a table saw when building a deck. If you are looking at getting a shop started though a table saw should be your first stationary tool purchase.
 
  #8  
Old 01-20-07, 09:32 AM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 3,140
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If you are serious in investing in a good saw that will last for years with no problems, get a mitre saw. The Miketa 10" or 12" double mitre sliding saw is the Cats Meow. The saw runs around $600, but worth every cent. On our construction jobs it is the first saw to be set up, and the last to be put away.
I have two of them. Many times I will go to a job and have all the lumber cut
before my guys ever get there. One man job. In addition to being a good straight cut say, it can turn 45 degrees in both directions on the horizontal and also 45 degrees on the vertical. The sliding rails allow you to cut 13" material with the 10" blade and let you cut 4x4's in one cut. Circular saws are good, and we also use them everyday, but you do not always get a good straight cut. I have two table saws, one stationary and one portable and I very seldom use them. I have not used my set of new hand saws in over 10 years. Just my thoughts. What ever you do, do not buy a cheap saw. The bearings in cheap saws are nylon. They burn out fast. Good Luck
 
  #9  
Old 01-20-07, 12:07 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2001
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for all the suggestions ,, it looks like the mitre saw might be my best bet as it will do everything that i want for the deck and would come in useful for my other projects in the future ,, that being said , there are other birthdays , father days etc to get my table saw ,,, but for this year ,, the mitre saw will be what i eventually get.

As for hand saws , i do need new ones as most of mine are hand me downs from over the years and it's time to upgrade them , so i'll be keeping my eyes open for those coming on sale in the future as well.

Thanks again everyone
Gord
 
  #10  
Old 01-20-07, 03:10 PM
mango man's Avatar
Member
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Sw FL
Posts: 2,122
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
if your handsaws are decent quilty send them out to be set and sharpened .no need to "upgrade"
 
  #11  
Old 01-20-07, 04:36 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,424
Received 156 Votes on 138 Posts
I agree with mm, sharpened old saws are probably better than what you can readily find new.
 
  #12  
Old 01-21-07, 10:19 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2001
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Unfortuneatly , my old saws are really crap ,, all the good old saws that were my grandfathers and greatgrandfathers (who was a carpenter) disappeared after my dad died ,, i think my sisters husbands grabbed them , one who has probably sold them by now , that and about 100 old drill bits that dated back to the turn of the century ,,and not 2000! also went missing. But thats another story ,basically mine are crap , cheap things.

Gord
 
  #13  
Old 01-21-07, 12:45 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,593
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Saw

I have jig saw, radial arm saw, hand saw, circular saw, mitre saw, key hole saw(drywall saw), but no see-saw.

Seriously, in my mind, the best tool for building a deck is the circular saw used with a triangle square as a guide. With a little practice you can get precision cuts every time. Just my two cents.

I really enjoy this forum. Thanks, guys.
 
  #14  
Old 01-21-07, 01:53 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,424
Received 156 Votes on 138 Posts
Originally Posted by Wirepuller38 View Post
the best tool for building a deck is the circular saw used with a triangle square as a guide.

While a mitre saw can be handy, using a skil saw and a speed square [as a fence/guide] will allow a 'poor boy' to do just as good of a job.
 
  #15  
Old 01-21-07, 01:58 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by gordow View Post
I'm getting ramped up for this spring to remove and rebuild a new deck onto my house and my wife wants to get me a new saw as a gift for use on the deck , but i'm not sure what saw i should get that i would get the most use out of during the building of the deck and for future projects that might come up in the future.

Would you suggest a table saw , or a mitre/chop saw??

I can see the use for both on the deck in varying degrees , but was wondering what you "pros" would suggest.

Thanks Gord
It would depend on what you foresee your future projects will be. If it will more rough carpentry things like building a deck then I would go with a CMS but if you also might be doing some good grade furniture or cabinet work then I would go with a table saw such as Ridgid Model TS3650. The advantage of a CMS is that with an outside project you can move the saw to your work site. However a CMS doesn't do ripping. A tables saw stays pretty much in one place. They can be moved with help but it can be a pain. However, they are much more versatile and accurate than a CMS, (except for cross cutting, which is what they were made for), and they can miter just fine and also rip. Hope this helps. Need more info, just yell.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: