Cutting 2x4's-best saw?? reciprocating or??


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Old 02-19-07, 06:25 AM
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Cutting 2x4's-best saw?? reciprocating or??

Greetings!
I am cutting a pass through in my kitchen to the dining room and used a reciprocating saw. It was difficult getting through those 2x4's and required much babe muscle power that I hadn't anticipated! I now need to cut it wider and need some feedback about the best tool to use. I used a Skil 8.5 reciprocating saw with a "wood" blade. The torque was set to 6 (the highest). I also had to replace the blade after only 6 2x4 cuts??!

Any ideas??
 
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Old 02-19-07, 07:00 AM
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I'm not familiar with the Skil reciprocating saw, but it sounds like it may be a bit underpowered. A good reciprocating saw should cut through your 2X4s easily. You shouldn't have to change blades after cutiing just a few 2X4s either.

You might try borrowing a saw from a friend to see if you get better results. If you are an inveterate DIYer, you might want to invest in a different brand.
 
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Old 02-19-07, 07:23 AM
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Wink

Thank you for your feedback. I am going to try a higher grade blade and if that doesn't produce results I'll upgrade my tool.

Inveterate diy'er....absolutely!
 
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Old 02-19-07, 07:33 AM
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I agree with wayne - a good recip saw has plenty of power to get through 2/4's. The good ones also have a long blade stroke, like 1 inch plus, and the cheap ones have a very short stroke. I use a Porter Cable Tiger saw, and have used a Milwaukee Sawsall and neither one had any difficulty cutting - sometimes they can be a handful to hang on to, however.

I wonder if it is somehow your techinique? You should make shure the "head" of the saw is resting against the work and the blade is moving in and out. Sometimes the blade gets pinched and the entire saw vibrates in and out and the blade stays fixed that ruins blades and doesn't cut very well.

You do have to purchase good blades - I like the bimetal ones that will cut through wood and nails.
 
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Old 02-19-07, 07:48 AM
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I'm sure my technique or lack of did have something to do with it. I did make sure that the base plate was held firmly against the work but I was a bit jumpy with my cuts.
I'll be at it again in a few hours and will pay very close attention to that as well as using a better blade.

wanna see pictures??
 
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Old 02-19-07, 08:08 AM
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Sure, pictures are always great. ... of the project, of course.
 
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Old 02-19-07, 08:16 AM
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Is it a battery powered saw? I was cutting a 7" hole through sheathing and "log" wood siding yesterday and it nearly sapped the energy from my saw, making the end of the hole cutting much harder than the beginning. Luckilly it's my only anticipated reciprocating saw work for this project, so I didn't need to take yet another trip down the tool aisle at HD...

Here's to babe muscle power! (I shocked the sacker at the grocery store when I told her *I* was the construction worker for our remodel. "You don't hear many women say that!" HAHAHA!!)
 
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Old 02-19-07, 01:44 PM
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Buy quality aggressive blades. I found some on ebay once that look like an old cross cut saw. They make butter out of framing. I do this for a living, so I never leave home without my recip. If you are encountering nails, Milwaukee makes a destruction blade which is a little wider and is made for this activity. When you use the recip, don't move the saw back and forward. That is why it has a motor. Let is do the work for you with moderate pressure, and you should be able to make the second cut. Good luck.
 
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Old 02-19-07, 02:24 PM
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Wink

I hope this is not a bearing wall and the studs come down on the saw blade.
 
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Old 02-19-07, 02:45 PM
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Ed sure has a good point.
Could the blade be piched by pressure from the stud?

If you try an agressive blade like a 12 tpi or a demolition blade as chandler suggested it should cut fairly easily, even with a lower quality saw
 
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Old 02-20-07, 06:50 AM
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Here are a few pictures of the kitchen/dining room prior and during the pass through installation.....

http://www.villagephotos.com/pubbrow...der_id=1828318

it seems that linking is turned off in this forum so please cut and paste the above URL.


The last picture shows where I am at right now. I was going to move/reroute the 220 wire myself but have since decided to have a pro do it. He'll be here today so hopefully the project can continue and be finished soon.

Comments and constructive criticism encouraged.
 
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Old 02-20-07, 03:33 PM
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Looks good. It'll definitely open up the Dining room and kitchen a bit.

A couple of suggestions

First, did you think of putting an arch in at the top? It doesn't look like it would be all that hard, and might add a bit to the look. Hard to tell from the pictures.

Second, I would consider putting a piece of granite or man-made quartz in as the base of the pass through - maybe even extend it to 8 inches wide or so, just to add some additional surface to set things on. In my house, that would make a nice place to collect stuff - mail, dirty dishes, etc..

Just my 2 cents.
 
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Old 02-28-07, 10:48 AM
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Definitely a reciprocating saw. These saws can handle what you want without any problem,UNLESS,the blade is dull,wrong blade,undersized saw.
I took out one side of a garage with a porter-cable tiger saw in no time.
The saw cut through everything, including nails.
 
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Old 03-02-07, 06:11 AM
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Sorry for the delay in my reply. My house is undergoing numerous major (poorly timed!) diy projects and I am up to my eyeballs in every kind of building material and power tool on the planet! Not to mention 3 children and 2 very large dogs running about, occasionally getting tangled in the extension cords, tossing random objects through the pass through and generally driving me crazy. Shall I even mention the husband who crushed the whole end of the house (roof, trusses, ceilings) with a 5,000lb. tree while trying to cut it down? Oh, it has been abject pandemonium for sure.


It's all good or will be and I expect the next week will be productive and hopefully full of completed projects. Our spirits are high, we keep laughing hard and going with the flow.


Anyway, thank you to all who replied to my saw query. I purchased new blades and the reciprocating saw worked like a charm. I still find it a bit much to manage, as it jumps about, when desiring a good clean cut. I expect that more experience will remedy that issue.

As far as adding an arch... I love the idea and think that it would add much to the lines of the kitchen. However, I'm kind of forced to put cabinets above the pass through as I need the space. I will be installing a new counter top that will have a generous overhang into the dining room as indy-diy mentioned. I'll have to be formica at this point which has always served me well. But the next phase of the kitchen remodel, 5 or so years down the road, will allow me to install granite or something else decedent. I can't wait!!
 
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Old 03-02-07, 02:52 PM
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Glad it is working out.

The reason the saw is bouncing around is because you are not applying pressure against the foot.
When you cut you of course need to apply pressure in the diraction of the cut but you alo have to press the foot against the piece you are cutting.
You can cut freehand where the foot is off the work but it takes a stiff arm to keep it steady.
 
 

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