Converting Sears Compressor from 110-220


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Old 03-14-07, 09:52 PM
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Converting Sears Compressor from 110-220

I have an Oil lubed Sears Craftsman Professional compressor Model# 19551, the manual state it can be run at 110 or 220. In my garage I have a 110 and 220 outlet right next to each other. When I look up the parts for this compressor at Sears website they list a cord but it is the 110, what do I need to do for 220.
Thanks
Gregory
 
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Old 03-15-07, 04:17 AM
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Is the amperage of the 220 volt circuit correct for the compressor?

To convert to 220 volt you normally reconfigure the connectors inside the motor and then cut off the 120 volt plug and replace it with the correct one.
You should be able to purchase the right one at a major hardware store.

Make sure that the motor is capable of running at 220 by checking its nameplate.

Why do you want to do this?
 
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Old 03-15-07, 04:52 AM
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Originally Posted by GregH View Post
Why do you want to do this?
Why? I would if I could.. Less current draw=less money to run it..
 
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Old 03-15-07, 05:00 AM
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The cost of running any electrical device is based on wattage not current or amperage.
Regardless of the voltage the running wattage will be the same.

Watts = Amps X Volts

One advantage to the higher voltage is you could get away with a smaller conductor so if you needed a long wire run or long extension cord you could do it with a smaller guage wire.
 
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Old 03-15-07, 05:03 AM
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Perhaps you just answered your own question..
 
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Old 03-15-07, 08:31 AM
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Yes, on the motor it list's 110 or 220 voltage. I had a 220 voltage compressor, before this one but it took up too much space. The 220 never seemed to be straining and took less time to get 150PSI. The one I have now, has the same horsepower 5 and tank size 30, but seems to take longer to get to 150 PSI.
Greg
 
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Old 03-15-07, 08:48 AM
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The compressor is made by FLORIDA PNEUMATIC, I was wondering if this a decent brand or just cheap crap I bought it 3 years ago from a friend, it was still crated.
Greg
 
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Old 03-15-07, 03:39 PM
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I run all my shop big boys on 240 volts, not to save money, as GregH says, it is based on wattage, not voltage or amperage (although there is some savings on the power curve, but not much). I did it for spool up. Table, radial and all the bigger motors spool up much faster and don't tend to bog on the higher voltage.
 
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Old 03-15-07, 03:44 PM
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In order for the capacity to increase the motor would have to turn faster.
The rpm of the motor would be the same regardless of the voltage.
If you had a correctly sized breaker with the proper guage wire you would not see much difference in performance.
You might find that if there were a fairly long wire run the motor might pick up speed a bit more quickly because of voltage drop on the line.
It also sometimes causes less light dimming on start up because of the same reason.
I personally prefer to run motors at the higher voltage for the reasons stated but if you are doing this for more capacity it won't help.

One thing that you might find is that if you were able to change the pressure setting to 100 psi your unit will run way less and shut off sooner.
The only reason mfrs have that high of a setting is to give you the illusion of having more air.
You will indeed have a tiny bit more air capacity when the tank is filled to this pressure but once the compressor starts this advantage is lost.
This higher pressure causes the pump and motor to work harder, makes the unit more prone to generating moisture within the tank and burns up electricity for not much advantage.

The 5 hp rating you say the unit has is grossly overstated.
In a normal motor the highest hp rating that will normally operate on a 15 amp 120 volt cct is 1 1/2 hp.

I found their website but the manual section was down.
Post the model of the unit and see if you can find it at their site.
http://www.florida-pneumatic.com/

There is some air compressor information in the sticky a the top of this forum.
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=131654
 
 

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