What is the correct way of using a Nail Gun??


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Old 04-30-07, 06:41 AM
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Question What is the correct way of using a Nail Gun??

OK, I've been reading about the dangers of a nail gun. hitting knots and having the nail get re-directed ( into your hand!) or the nail splitting the wood and keep on going ( into your foot or other parts of the body)

So, sound like, if you stand behind the nail gun, you are safe? The nail can't come back at you with force (Can it?) And sounds like you should look the wood over carefully for knots.

Question 2: I have a brad nailer and it did wonders on doing trim. So Wife got me a framing nailer, (so I can build her her deck!) It drives full head nails. I made sure I bought the correct ones 3". (21 Deg.)

I noticed that when I fire it, there is a recoil, So I took my other hand and held the top of the gun to brace it against the wood. But sometimes the gun would 'hop' when fired and the nails ended up bent, and not driven all the way in. what is the correct way of holding this thing? Should I let it 'bounce back' or try and hold it firmly against the wood? (with 2 hands) I assume the bent nail was because it 'hopped' when I fired it in?

Also, how often should you put oil in the thing? I will only be using it on weekends, not heavy use.

With all the accidents with tools, it would be nice if there was some videos on the correct way of using power tools!

Thanks,

Chris
 
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Old 04-30-07, 08:15 AM
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I don't own a framing nailer but the basics are the same as with a finish nailer.

You should be able to operate the gun with one hand. Occasionally a nail won't 'set' all the way, that's why you don't throw away your hammer Usually if nail hits a knot it will bend/curve and possibly come out on the side which is why you never want to have your free hand too close to the area getting nailed.

You should always oil a nail gun prior to using it for the 1st time [each day] and every several hours thereafter.
 
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Old 04-30-07, 08:24 AM
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I don't own a framing nailer either but I'm wondering if you have a enough air pressure ,

seems like that could be why the nails don't set
 
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Old 04-30-07, 02:11 PM
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Your nailer was probably shipped with an additional trigger. If so, it is a "sequential" trigger, and the one that is attached to the gun is a "contact" trigger. Until you get really comfortable with it, take the contact trigger off and install the sequential trigger. A double strike on top of the preceding nail does not make for a happy day. In addition, you see all those guys hitting their nailers and driving 25 nails in one joint.....dumb! It wastes nails, wastes air pressure, and is dangerous. One shot, one kill.
As mango man indicated, your bouncing is probably due to too low outlet pressure. You may have 100 lbs of pressure in the tank, but you need 90 psi to drive the nailer. So "dead end" the hose and set the pressure properly.
Keep your fingers out of the line of fire (or possible direction of fire). Grain, knots, moisture, other nails, all play a part as to where the nail will drive.
My daughter is a Doctor of Optometry in Denver, and has told me of total horror stories of misdirected nails and people not wearing safety glasses. Wear them, period. Not cute little yellow grocery store glasses, but bona fide certified safety glasses.
Be careful, and anticipate.
 
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Old 05-04-07, 08:44 AM
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thanks for the replies:

I got a replacement gun from where I got it, so I will try the new one out.

It has a feature were you cant just hold the trigger and hit it to shoot the next nail. It expects you to release the trigger each time. (That's fine by me - sounds too dangerous the other way!)

As for the pressure, that may be the issue. I looked at the 90psi before connecting the line, so I will adjust it after the lines and gun are connected. The instructions say between 80-100PSI.

I assume that you first align the gun, press against the wood, then press the trigger. Should I hold the gun with my other hand or let it 'bounce away'?

Thanks

Chris
 
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Old 05-04-07, 09:07 AM
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It shouldn't bound when you hold it firmly. Hold it as if it was a loaded Glock. Don't aim at anyone other than the wood you are about to nail. Safety glasses are a big part of the nail gun, use them always. Keep kids away from your tools especially that gun and un-plug it when not in use..like when you go get something to drink..

3 to 5 drops of neumatic oil should be applied every time you are going to use it and every several hours of continuous use. You need only one hand to use the nailer and grab it firmly against the wood before you pull the trigger. Adjust your line pressure on a couple of boards till the head of the nail is just below the surface of the wood. Too little pressure and the gun will misfire or will bounce on every shot. too much pressure and it will nail too dip and will cause splinters and in ply-wood the nails will go through and could possibly hit someone or a pet.

Enjoy your nail gun and be safe...
 
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Old 05-06-07, 06:54 AM
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One other often overlooked safety device. If you're going to be doing a lot of nailing wear ear protection. The loud, short duration noise from a nailer is very damaging to hearing.
 
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Old 05-06-07, 08:28 AM
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90-100 psi seems low to drive 3" nails. My little framing gun's compressor is set at 90'ish psi to drive up to 2" brads ..(tho I usually use 1 5/8" brads...)
I would think one would need more that 90psi for framing...! You are going through thicker material.
 
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Old 05-06-07, 11:24 AM
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Mine runs fine at 90 psi. I think the larger piston and driver on the framers takes into consideration the outlet pressure.
 
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Old 05-06-07, 12:08 PM
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Probably so.. Ive only used a framer once in a while and never checked the settings...as it was set to go already.
 
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Old 05-06-07, 12:17 PM
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I'm wondering if the compressor is able to deliver 90 psi continually pop a few nails and its only delivering 65 psi , now they don't set until it recovers
 
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Old 05-06-07, 01:05 PM
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A compressor with a small tank won't keep up with a contact trigger framer. I have my pressures set at 75-125, on a double hot dog Ridgid, so I have some sibilance of pressure all the time. I definitely don't use a contact trigger on my framer, for safety reasons and for the pressure problems it causes.
 
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Old 05-06-07, 07:54 PM
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Using a sequential-fire trigger (rather than the bounce-fire trigger) won't slow you down much and will avoid driving 2 nails where you only wanted to put one.

In soft wood with smooth nails, 90 psi should work fine. In treated wood or engineered lumber or with ring-shank nails, there is more resistance and fasteners may not be fully seated. Run the pressure up to 115-120 psi in this situation.

I use hot-dipped galvanized, ring-shank nails in PT lumber for decking and fencing. Pressure is set at 120 psi and the depth is set for toenailing rather than flush-nailing.
 
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Old 05-07-07, 04:19 AM
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" I'm wondering if the compressor is able to deliver 90 psi continually "

A nail gun uses cfm in short bursts unlike sanding or painting where you eat up cfm in a hurry. Unless the compressor is really small it shouldn't have a problem keeping up.
 
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Old 05-09-07, 07:40 PM
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Interesting info.. Thanks.
My primary use of a nail gun has been for base/casings/crowns - using mostly 1 5/8" - 2" (max) brads and single shot per, so 'heavy duty' is not usually called for. - But the feedback here, is most informative.
 
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Old 05-10-07, 01:22 PM
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thanks all.

I will check the pressure, add oil before use. and 'give it a shot'. See it the pressure had to do with the bounce back. ( and be more ready for a kick back) I never fired a glock!.
 
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Old 05-10-07, 01:26 PM
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Talking

Oh, and by the way Wayne, did you say something?
 
 

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