Framing Nailer Pros/Cons


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Old 05-02-07, 08:52 AM
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Framing Nailer Pros/Cons

Greetings,

After always borrowing from friends, I'm trying to pick out a framing nailer to buy. I've had good luck with the Bostitch guns and was looking at that brand, but can't decide which features are important.

For instance: What's the difference between paper, plastic, or wire weld collated nails? I don't really have a preference for clipped vs. round as they are both approved here. Benefits or drawbacks of any types?

Also, it would be nice to have the capability of nailing metal brackets, which the Bostitch F21PL and F33PT can do. Any experience with these models?

Thanks!
 
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Old 05-02-07, 10:27 AM
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I am unsure of the model but I chose a Bostitch wire colated clipped head framer after a friend bought one that used paper colated nails.
If he does work outdoors and it's wet or damp his nails don't feed properly.

Don't use mine a lot but the one job I did made it easily pay for itself.

Another thing I noticed is that nailer brands seem to be slightly regional, especially in a small town.
In my area Bostitch is widely supported with all dealers carrying some Bostitch nails.
Another town I occasionally visit many hours away seems to be a Senco town.
Check to see what nails are readily available to you and at what cost.
 
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Old 05-02-07, 03:46 PM
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I am not up on newer nailers, but clipped head nails are being dropped from most building codes. Supossedly, they do not have the same homding power of round head nails. I have several Bostich nailers(differents types) and they are close to indestructable, given proper maintenance.
 
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Old 05-02-07, 06:32 PM
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Likewise I use the Bostitch framer, and have done so for years. It is bullet proof, if properly oiled and maintained. The difference between the clipped head and round head is a bunch of hooey. I have never, never had a joint pull off the head of a clipped head nail. Certain proponent groups, mostly manufacturers, lobby to get restrictions placed and succeed for the most part. Wait, I'm getting political, and you can't do that.
Our local repair guy (for nail guns) has the joist hanger nailer, and has offered it to several contractors, stating if you like it pay me for it, otherwise bring it back. So far no one has brought one back. So apparently they are as advertised. I use my palm nailer and hot dipped galvanized nails for that, as the nailer ain't cheap.
 
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Old 05-03-07, 07:44 AM
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I have a Bostich framer that I've used on several large projects. I use full head nails, for no other reason than the full head nailer was on sale at the time. I liked mine so much that I bought a Bostich finish nailer.
 
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Old 05-04-07, 04:09 PM
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Thanks for all the suggestions! I picked up a Bostitch Wire Weld nailer, which came with a free palm nailer (never used one, but seems like a good deal). Hopefully that'll work well on metal connectors that I can't get to with the old hammer. I could hardly find ANY plastic collated nails around here, where everybody carries lots of wire weld ones- so that was a good suggestion GregH. Hope to use them this weekend if it quits raining...
 
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Old 05-04-07, 04:41 PM
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OOOH, the palm nailer. Ideal for Simpsons on a deck, where you normally hit your hand instead of the nail with a hammer.
 
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Old 05-06-07, 06:47 AM
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My nailer uses plastic collated nails. I haven't had a problem finding them. I buy Grip Rite on Amazon.

The biggest drawback for me is that sometimes I miss pounding nails with a hammer. Every now and then I leave the nailer in it's case and break out my old wood handled framing hammer. Every now and then I hit my thumb with the waffle faced, 26 oz SOB and it goes back into the tool box.
 
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Old 05-06-07, 07:48 PM
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You are describing two separate tasks:
1. Wood framing
2. Metal connector installation

There are some framers that will do both tasks, if there is enough space to get them into the area where the metal connector/hanger is placed. A regular framing nailer (for task 1) and a palm nailer (for task 2) is a better setup.

I have a 31-degree framer that uses clipped-head or Roundrive (full head) nails. I also have a 20-degree framer that uses round-head nails. I also own a palm nailer that gets used now and then. The degree indication is the collation angle of the nails so that they feed properly from the magazine.

Choose a framing nailer that you will be able to get parts for in the future and that you can buy good quality nails for locally.
 
 

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