Q: Air compressor coupling measurements?


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Old 05-13-07, 03:09 PM
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Question Q: Air compressor coupling measurements?

I just bought my first air compressor; Campbell Hausfeld 2 Gallon Mini Twin-Stack Air Compressor with 1 1/4-Inch 2-in-1 Brad Nailer / Stapler Kit. So far I've been able to figure out how to operate the machine, but I'm a little lost on the coupling sizes.

According to my manual (for the stapler / nailer) it says to use a 3/8" air hose (for min air pressure of 150 psi) or a 1/2" air hose (for 50' run or longer). I measured the width of the hose that came with my compressor and it's 1/4". The threaded ends measure 1/2". Now I'm unclear about using the hose because obviously it's neither 3/8" or 1/2" (like the manual recommends). This seems odd because it is the hose they included with the compressor.

Also, the manual for the gun says to use a 3/8" quick plug (1/4" NPT threads) with an inside diameter of .315" (8mm) on the tool and a 3/8" quick coupler on the air hose. I measured the plug that goes into the gun (which has an end that snaps into a quick connect plug) and it is 1/2". The quick connect coupler that came with the compressor is also 1/2" (on both ends).

I am measuring the width of the threads. Maybe I'm not measuring correctly? I'm completely unclear what is what with this thing because the measurements I've taken do not match with those recommended by the manual. So I wondering if you can shed any light on this for me. I would appreciate any help you could offer.

Thank you.
 
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Old 05-14-07, 06:33 PM
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Thumbs up Welcome to our forums desktop!

You can not relate the diameter of the threaded portion directly to its measurement.

Regardless what the manual says for lengths under 100 feet passing less than 6 cfm at 90 psi, a 3/8" diameter hose is all you need.
You most certainly do not need anywhere close to a 1/2" inside diameter hose for what you are doing.
Be assured that you can use whatever hose came with your unit.

You can measure the threads and use the chart ot see what size the fitting is with the link below.
The only way you can tell what the actual inside diameter of the hose is would be to read in in print somewhere or cut it and then measure it.

If it all snaps together and works then "Don't worry, be happy"!

http://www.plumbingstore.com/pipethreadsizing.html
 
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Old 05-14-07, 06:46 PM
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Thanks, Greg.

Another question I have is about moisture. A friend recommended I purchase a moisture filter, since I don't want to risk getting any moisture inside the vacuum or especially my computer (when I blow that out). I was wondering if anyone here could recommend a moisture filter? I looked around online and I think all I need is a simple one with a glass bowl and a desiccant filter.

Also, how should I hook the filter up? Since it's a vertical filter I was thinking of just permanently attaching it right to the tank (with a 3/8" x 3/8" male coupling) and then putting a 1/4 in. male NPT plug on the other end so I could just snap the air hose onto it. Or perhaps I should put a male 1/4" quick connect plug on the one side of the filter itself and the 1/4 in. male NPT plug on the one end of the air hose?

I appreciate any advice. Thanks.
 
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Old 05-14-07, 07:56 PM
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The filter needs to be in an upright position at all times so mounting it on the compressor outlet makes sense.

You should keep in mind that computers and electronics are not usually dusted with air from an air compressor, especially if an oiled type. Common air filter/moisture separators do not do that good of a job especially in humid weather
It is sometimes hard to tell when moisture will show itself because it tends to come out in random spurts.
This is one task best done with air in a can.

If you do try to dust your computer with an air comp make sure you have a regulator and turn down the pressure.
 
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Old 05-14-07, 09:06 PM
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My main purpose for buying this compressor was to save me from having to buy all those cans of air. In another forum someone said, "I'm not sure I would use the compressor for the computer but if you do I would also put one of the plastic disposable filters on right before the blow gun in addition to to filter coming out of the tank."

So I would need two filters then - one mounted near the tank and one of those disposable ones near the blow gun.

Also, I think I may need a straight air hose, as opposed to one that curls. I've found a nice rubber one made by Goodyear, but then there's also some that are PVC? I don't know what that means, but the straight rubber ones look like the best bet.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 05-16-07, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by desktop View Post
I was thinking of just permanently attaching it right to the tank
It'll catch dirt pretty well, but as far as a water trap it won't be very good. You are better off with a disposable filter at the tool. Or both, there's never enough filtration
 
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Old 05-16-07, 03:21 PM
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Really, the cost of equipping yourself with an air compressor to clean computers may not offer much in the way of savings unless you are doing this on a commercial basis cleaning many units a day.

A large repair shop that I once serviced used a refrigerated air dryer on an oilless compressor and had a filter on each hose.

I have several compressors and a refrigerated dryer I haven't hooked up yet but I feel it is safer for me to use air cans rather that spit oil or water into my electronics.
I was able to get a three pack of large cans at Costco for only a couple of bucks each.
 
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Old 05-16-07, 06:07 PM
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Just as an opposing view...

I've used my air compressor (oil less, 170g tank) for years to clean computers.
For filtration, it has a glass bowl water catcher.
Pressure is set at 100 psi.

The most moisture I've seen come out is right when it's first used, and it's just a fine mist, not major water, which will quickly evaporate with the blast of air that follows it.

I do however, disconnect the machine and take it outside to dust it.

I suppose a smaller compressor may be more prone to drawing water from the bottom of the tank if not regularly drained.
 
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Old 05-16-07, 07:39 PM
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In my area when the weather gets very humid, we still get water in the lines. Even with a refrigerated air drier.
 
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Old 05-17-07, 04:53 AM
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Today I discovered something about my compressor - using it to blow air it only lasts about thirty seconds or so, then I have to wait about five minutes for it to fill back up. This is somewhat annoying, but I think I can live with it. It beats spending $6 or more on one can of air (times that by at least two cans per week times 52 weeks....).

I noticed in the bowl of the filter that there was some water. I think I'll pick up some inline filters as well just to be safe. I thank you all for your help. I appreciate it.
 
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Old 05-17-07, 05:03 AM
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Why on earth would you blow out the computer every week, and use two cans of air to do it?
 
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Old 05-17-07, 05:35 AM
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I blow out more than just my computer. I like to keep things clean, which is why most of what I own usually lasts a long time. It can get very dusty in my apartment and I go through a lot of cans of air - maybe not two a week but at least one can a week. And as I said canned air is expensive. So I believe I've made a wise decision replacing them with the compressor.
 
 

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